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Updated: 50 min 22 sec ago

TuxMachines: Prpl Foundation demos first open source hypervisor for MIPS IoT

Saturday 16th of July 2016 07:48:35 AM

The Prpl Foundation demoed the “prplHypervisor,” an open source, Linux-ready hypervisor for MIPS-based IoT with multiple secure domains for different OSes.

The prplSecurity framework is one of the chief projects of the Imagination Technologies backed, Linaro-like prpl Foundation, which is developing open source Linux and Android code for MIPS processors. The latest piece is the prplHypervisor, which prpl calls “the industry-first light-weight open source hypervisor specifically designed to provide security through separation for the billions of embedded connected devices that power the Internet of Things.”

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LXer: Windows 10 a failure by Microsoft's own metric -- it won't hit one billion devices by mid-2018

Saturday 16th of July 2016 06:36:25 AM
All that nagware hasn't workedWhen Windows 10 launched, Microsoft claimed it would have the new operating system on a billion devices by mid-2018. That isn't going to happen, however, Redmond has now admitted.…

LXer: SBC, COM, and dev kit tap octa-core, Cortex-A53 Samsung SoC

Saturday 16th of July 2016 04:42:03 AM
sModule’s SBC, COM, and development kit run Ubuntu 12.04 or Android 4.4 on a 1.4GHz octa-core, Cortex-A53 Samsung S5P6818 SoC. Shenzhen-based sModule Technology is a subsidiary of CoreWind that has primarily made wireless modules, but has recently jumped into Linux- and Android-ready computer-on-modules and development kits, as does CoreWind itself. Recently, sModule released several boards […]

LXer: Good News: Carla Hayden Easily Approved As The New Librarian Of Congress

Saturday 16th of July 2016 02:47:41 AM
She's shown in the past a willingness to stand up and fight against government surveillance and for freedom of speech and access to information. Her positions on copyright are less clear, but as she's now in charge of the Copyright Office, hopefully she'll bring some much needed balance to that office, and a greater recognition, as a librarian, of the importance of access to information, rather than locking up all info.

TuxMachines: GNOME News

Saturday 16th of July 2016 02:04:59 AM
  • GNOME Keysign new GUI and updates
  • GSoC Updates: ownCloud music Ampache API

    Continuing from the grilo owncloud plugin last month, I’ve been working towards integrating the source with GNOME Music. In order to minimize the network requests, we’ve decided to cache the results in a local database. This would also improve user experience since cached results would populate relatively faster in the UI. Victor Toso suggested I look into GOM for implementing the cache and querying the data. My initial thought was to use raw SQL queries to query an sqlite database but this abstraction would help indeed.

  • Future of relative window positioning

    With emerging display server technologies, toolkits sometimes need to adapt how they implement the features they provide. One set of features that needs adaptation is how GTK+ positions popup windows such as menus, popovers and tooltips, so that they will be placed within the work area of the monitor.

    In the old days, when GTK+ wanted to position a menu, it would first look up the global position of the parent window of the menu. It would then look up the work areas of all the monitors connected. With the given work areas, the global position of the parent window, and the intended menu position relative to the parent window it wanted to place the menu, GTK+ would use a clever algorithm calculating a reasonable position for the menu to be placed so that it would be visible to the user. For example, if the File menu doesn’t have enough space to popup below the parent menu item, then GTK+ would re-position it above the parent menu item instead.

  • Window/Menu Positioning Improvements For GTK+ On Wayland/Mir

    Red Hat's Jonas Ådahl has shared work being done to the GTK+ toolkit for avoiding global window positions for tooltips/menus/popovers and instead refactor it down to GDK and allow relative positioning.

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TuxMachines: Red Hat News

Saturday 16th of July 2016 02:04:24 AM

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TuxMachines: Fedora: The Latest

Saturday 16th of July 2016 02:03:54 AM

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TuxMachines: Security Leftovers

Saturday 16th of July 2016 02:03:25 AM
  • Friday's security updates
  • Room for Application Security Improvement

    Using open source components is a common software development process; just how common, however, may come as a surprise -- even a shock -- to some. The average organization uses 229,000 open source components a year, found research by Sonatype, a provider of software development lifecycle solutions that manages a Central Repository of these components for the Java development community.

    There were 31 billion requests for downloads from the repository in 2015, up from 17 billion in 2014, according to Sonatype.

    The number "blows people's minds," said Derek Weeks, a VP and DevOps advocate at Sonatype. "The perspective of the application security professional or DevOps security professional or open source governance professional is, 'This really changes the game. If it were 100, I could control that, but if it is 200,000 the world has changed."

  • Ubuntu Forums Suffer Data breach; Credit Goes to SQL Flaw

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TuxMachines: Android Leftovers

Saturday 16th of July 2016 02:02:41 AM

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LXer: PC Shipments Rose in the U.S. During Q2

Saturday 16th of July 2016 12:53:19 AM
In the U.S., PC shipments rose nearly 5 percent.

LXer: Managing a Headless VirtualBox Installation with phpvirtualbox (Ubuntu 16.04 LTS)

Friday 15th of July 2016 10:58:57 PM
Phpvirtualbox is a web-based VirtualBox front-end written in PHP that allows you to access and control remote VirtualBox instances. It tries to resemble the VirtualBox GUI as much as possible to make work with it as easy as possible. It is a nice replacement for the VirtualBox GUI if you run VirtualBox in headless servers (like in the tutorial VBoxHeadless - Running Virtual Machines with VirtualBox 5.1 on a headless Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server). This tutorial explains how to install phpvirtualbox on an Ubuntu 16.04 server to manage a locally installed, headless VirtualBox.

TuxMachines: How To Setup A Web Server And Host Website On Your Own Linux Computer

Friday 15th of July 2016 10:31:30 PM

Welcome to small tutorial series of hosting website on Linux machine. This series of articles will teach how to setup a web server on Linux computer and make it available online. The website we'll host on our personal computer can be accessed from around the globe. In this article(Part 1), we are going to install all the required tools to setup web server. So let's get started and start our own setup web server. ​

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TuxMachines: Linux and Graphics

Friday 15th of July 2016 10:18:11 PM
  • Google Developers Improve Mesa's Android EGL Support
  • Nouveau DRM Code Updated For Linux 4.8

    The Nouveau open-source NVIDIA DRM driver changes have been queued in DRM-Next for the Linux 4.8 kernel.

    Nouveau updates this time around include GK20A/GM20B Tegra K1/X1 voltage and clock improvements as well as initial support for GP100 and GP104 GPUs. The latter provides initial KMS support for the GeForce GTX 1000 series. While NVIDIA did release some Pascal firmware, it ended up being only for the GP100 and not the GP104 or GP106. Thus with Linux 4.8 there isn't any hardware-accelerated support for the consumer GeForce GTX 1060/1070/1080 cards on the open-source driver stack. For those cards it comes down to un-accelerated kernel mode-setting support until NVIDIA releases the rest of the Pascal firmware in the future.

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TuxMachines: Servers News

Friday 15th of July 2016 10:16:35 PM
  • Operators Are Migrating From NFV MANO Trials to Reality

    Some operators are progressing from network functions virtualization (NFV) management and orchestration (MANO) trials to the launching of commercial services, according to a new report from Current Analysis.

    While some of those commercial services are at the virtualized infrastructure manager (VIM) levels of orchestration, some are at the virtual network function manager (VNFM) level and even the NFV orchestrator level, the analyst firm says. This is happening even though ETSI hasn’t released final MANO specifications.

  • The Emerging Containers as a Service Marketplace

    While many developers are enthusiastic about the way containers can speed up deployments, administrators and operators may be a bit more wary, given the considerable amount of retooling that their internal systems may need to go through to support container-based pipelines.

    Which is why the emerging Containers as a Service (CaaS) approach may prove popular to both camps.

  • ​IBM to open blockchain innovation centre in Singapore

    IBM plans to open its first blockchain innovation centre in Singapore, with one of its first projects to focus on developing trade solutions using blockchain technology to improve the efficiency of multi-party trade finance processes and transactions.

    According to IBM, the centre -- to be staffed by Singaporean-based talent and researchers from IBM Research Labs worldwide -- together with the Singapore Economic Development Board (EDB) and the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) will work with government, industries, and academia to develop applications and solutions based on blockchain, cybersecurity, and cognitive computing technologies.

  • What Has the Open Container Initiative Achieved in Its First Year?

    The Open Container Initiative (OCI) was formed in June 2015. Their main goal was to establish common standards for software containers. It was originally named the Open Container Project and later became a Linux Foundation project. Founding members included CoreOS, Amazon Web Services, Apcera, Cisco, EMC, Fujitsu, Goldman Sachs, Google, HP, Huawei, IBM, Intel, Joyent, Mesosphere, Microsoft, Pivotal, Rancher Labs, Red Hat, and VMware Docker.

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TuxMachines: Leftovers: Software

Friday 15th of July 2016 10:15:08 PM
  • GNU Guile 2.0.12 released

    We are delighted to announce the availability of GNU Guile 2.0.12, a maintenance release in the current stable 2.0 series.

  • Update from La Mapería

    La Mapería exists right now as a Python program that downloads raster tiles from Mapbox Studio. This is great in that I don't have to worry about setting up an OpenStreetMap stack, and I can just worry about the map stylesheet itself (this is the important part!) and a little code to render the map's scale and frame with arc-minute markings.

    I would prefer to have a client-side renderer, though. Vector tiles are the hot new thing; in theory I should be able to download vector tiles and render them with Memphis, a Cairo-based renderer. I haven't investigated how to move my Mapbox Studio stylesheet to something that Memphis can use (... or that any other map renderer can use, for that matter).

  • You Can Now Use Netflix on Vivaldi and Other Chromium-Based Web Browsers

    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard managed to create a handy script that would allow you to watch Netflix movies on Vivaldi, as well as any other Chromium-based web browser.

    As you're probably aware of by now, Netflix only supports the Google Chrome and Opera web browsers when we talk about watching movies streamed via their online platform on Linux kernel-based operating systems. On Windows and Mac the there are more browsers supports, including Mozilla Firefox and Safari.

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More in Tux Machines

10 hot Android smartphones that got price cuts recently

With numerous smartphone getting launched each month, brands always adjust prices to give slightly competitive edge to older smartphone models and also to clear inventories. Here are 10 smartphones that got price cuts recently. Read more

Debian and Ubuntu News

  • Debian Project News - July 29th, 2016
    Welcome to this year's third issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.
  • SteamOS Brewmaster 2.87 Released With NVIDIA Pascal Support
  • Snap interfaces for sandboxed applications
    Last week, we took a look at the initial release of the "portal" framework developed for Flatpak, the application-packaging format currently being developed in GNOME. For comparison, we will also explore the corresponding resource-control framework available in the Snap format developed in Ubuntu. The two packaging projects have broadly similar end goals, as many have observed, but they tend to vary quite a bit in the implementation details. Naturally, those differences are of particular importance to the intended audience: application developers. There is some common ground between the projects. Both use some combination of techniques (namespaces, control groups, seccomp filters, etc.) to restrict what a packaged application can do. Moreover, both implement a "deny by default" sandbox, then provide a supplemental means for applications to access certain useful system resources on a restricted or mediated basis. As we will see, there is also some overlap in what interfaces are offered, although the implementations differ. Snap has been available since 2014, so its sandboxing and resource-control implementations have already seen real-world usage. That said, the design of Snap originated in the Ubuntu Touch project aimed at smartphones, so some of its assumptions are undergoing revision as Snap comes to desktop systems. In the Snap framework, the interfaces that are defined to provide access to system resources are called, simply, "interfaces." As we will see, they cover similar territory to the recently unveiled "portals" for Flatpak, but there are some key distinctions. Two classes of Snap interfaces are defined: one for the standard resources expected to be of use to end-user applications, and one designed for use by system utilities. Snap packages using the standard interfaces can be installed with the snap command-line tool (which is the equivalent of apt for .deb packages). Packages using the advanced interfaces require a separate management tool.
  • Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) Reaches End Of Life Today (July 28)
  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Yakkety Yak Gets A Unity HUD-Like Searchable Menu
    MATE HUD, a Unity HUD-like tool that allows searching through an application's menu, was recently uploaded to the official Yakkety Yak repositories, and is available (but not enabled) by default in Ubuntu MATE 16.10.

Tablet review: BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition

As employees have become more and more flexible in recent years thanks to the power and performance of mobile devices, the way we work has changed dramatically. We frequently chop and change between smartphones, tablets and laptops for different tasks, which has led to the growth of the hybrid market – devices such as Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 and Apple’s iPad Pro – that provide the power and functionality of a laptop with the mobility and convenience of a tablet. Read more

Leftovers: Software

  • qutebrowser v0.8.1
  • Anonymous publishing with Riffle
    Preserving anonymity online is an understandably hot topic these days. But it can be confused with related concepts like privacy and secure communication. A new protocol called Riffle was recently published [PDF] by researchers at MIT; it offers a different take on anonymity than that implemented by other projects. A Riffle network could be used to implement an anonymous but verifiable blogging or publishing platform: one in which the messages are visible to everyone, but the identity of all users remains hidden. For comparison, the most well-known anonymity project is, no doubt, Tor, which enables users to access Internet services without revealing their physical location on the network. It is possible to use Tor to access publishing services like Twitter and, thus, to broadcast content to the Internet at large without revealing one's identity. But Tor is just as useful at solving other problems, such as accessing remote servers that are blocked by a firewall. While important, that usage of Tor does not necessarily involve anonymity; one could, for instance, use it to log in to Facebook, and Tor alone does not prevent the use of web trackers by sites. Furthermore, Tor is the focus of near-constant attacks (against the network itself and against the algorithms that keep it working), and it may be vulnerable to large-scale traffic analysis—such as a national ISP could perform. One of the stated goals of Riffle is to prevent such traffic analysis, which has led to popular reports and online discussions referring to Riffle as a Tor competitor. But Riffle, in fact, tackles a narrower problem set. In a Riffle network, every message sent or file uploaded is eventually published in plaintext form where everyone can see it. The Riffle protocol offers strong guarantees that the identity of the message's uploader cannot be discovered—even in cases where multiple servers in the network have been compromised.
  • Announcing Serval!
    Serval is launching on Tuesday the 2nd of August, 2016. It will be available under the GPLv2 and is completely free to use.
  • Tangent Animation studio will support the Blender Institute to hire two devs full time to work on Blender 2.8 and a third one for Cycles
  • 5 Best Calendar Apps for Linux Desktop
    Time is money, as goes an old saying, therefore you need to manage it very well. This then calls for proper planning of your daily schedule, future events, appointments and several other daily activities.
  • Pandora Client `Pithos` Sees New Major Release
    Pithos 1.2.0 was released today and it includes a new explicit content filter option, new dialog design, along with other improvements and important bug fixes.
  • Terminix Now Available In PPA For Ubuntu 16.04 And Linux Mint 18 [Quick Update]
    Terminix was uploaded to the Debian Sid repositories recently. To make it easier to install and stay up to date with the latest Terminix versions, I used the official Debian packaging (thanks to the packagers!) and created a Terminix PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 and Linux Mint 18.
  • Geary – A Good Looking Modern Email Client for Linux
    Geary is a free and open source email client. It’s simple to setup and install, in a few minutes your done. No need to add extra features or add ons to install, it just works. The user interface is the easiest and simplest to use.
  • PVS-Studio confesses its love for Linux
    This post is about love. About the love of the static code analyzer PVS-Studio, for the great open source Linux operating system. This love is young, touching and fragile. It needs help and care. You will help greatly if you volunteer to help testing the beta-version of PVS-Studio for Linux.