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Updated: 1 hour 11 min ago

TuxMachines: Development News

Sunday 9th of October 2016 07:17:45 AM
  • The most important coding languages for IoT developers

    We have seen a changing of the guard in the past few years as software takes center stage and once-beloved hardware simply becomes a canvas for developers. The ability to code is an important skill for the production of any modern technology, especially a product that falls within the “internet of things.” If IoT developers are to create the next big thing in tech, they will need to know the most important and popular IoT coding languages. Here is a list of top coding languages providing the backbone of IoT software:

  • French programmers haul Apple into court over developer rules

    Nexedi, an open source software company based in France, has filed a lawsuit against Apple in Paris alleging that Apple's App Store contract is unfair.

    In a blog post, founder and CEO Jean-Paul Smets and UI designer Sven Franck said that the company has undertaken the lawsuit to force Apple to improve its support for the latest web technology in iOS.

    Smets and Franck point to technical shortcomings in mobile Safari such as lack of support for HTML5 service workers, webRTC, and WebM – web technologies necessary for running applications like the OfficeJS spreadsheet and online conferencing.

  • Why we are suing Apple for better HTML5 support in iOS?

    The primary reason for starting this lawsuit is because we hope that it will help Apple to sooner support the latest Web and HTML5 standards on its iOS platform - the operating system used by all iPhones.

    Anyone running html5test ( on his iPhone will find out that current iOS support of HTML5 Web technologies is lagging behind other platforms.

  • Vulkan 1.0.30 Released With Minor Changes

    With "Vulkan Next" likely not debuting until 2017, the Vulkan 1.0.x point releases continue with minor fixes to the Vulkan documentation.

read more

TuxMachines: Leftovers: OSS

Sunday 9th of October 2016 07:17:04 AM
  • The legacy of Pieter Hintjens

    When I watched Chad Fowler’s GOTO Amsterdam 2014 Keynote it got me thinking about what our aims should be in life.

    He mentions Joel Spolsky’s post from 2001: Good Software Takes Ten Years. Get Used To It, and says software typically only lasts five years so rarely gets to be very good.

    He asks, what does it take create legacy software with a positive meaning, that is software so good that you are fondly remembered for it for many years to come.

    How many very famous developers, or ex-developers are there in the world. You may disagree, but I would argue that Bill Gates is the only living person with worldwide fame partly associated with writing code.

    Only big company CEOs have any chance of becoming a household name. Even Sir Tim Berners Lee has only about half as many Twitter followers as Grumpy Cat.

  • AT&T Will Launch ECOMP Into Open Source in 2017

    A top AT&T executive said the company will launch its Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management, and Policy (ECOMP) platform into open source by the first quarter of 2017. And the Linux Foundation will be the host of the open source project.

    In a blog post, Chris Rice, SVP of AT&T Labs Domain 2.0 Architecture and Design, said that after the company developed ECOMP, it received a tremendous amount of feedback from service providers and virtual network function (VNF) providers that wanted more details about the platform. He also said the companies wanted AT&T to publicly state that it was going to open source the project.

  • What to Expect from OSCON London 2016

    It’s autumn/fall technology conference season… but you already knew that, so what’s coming next? O’Reilly’s OSCON event is just around the corner and the conference itself has seen the launch of many new projects from to OpenStack.

  • 8 Years Later: Saeed Malekpour Is Still In An Iranian Prison Simply For Writing Open Source Software

    We talk a great deal on Techdirt about the importance of free speech alongside the importance of not damning technological tools for the way third parties choose to use them. These matters can delve into minutiae in the American and Western forms of this conversation, with discussions about Section 230 protections and the like. But in other parts of the world, the conversation is much different.

    Back in 2008 in Iran, for instance, the government there elected to imprison a Canadian resident of Iranian lineage, initially under a death sentence, but later commuting that sentence to mere life imprisonment. His crime? Saeed Malekpour created some open source code for sharing photos on the internet that others within Iran used for pornography.

  • Why Implanted Medical Devices Should Have Open Source Code

    As medical implants become more common, sophisticated and versatile, understanding the code that runs them is vital. A pacemaker or insulin-releasing implant can be lifesaving, but they are also vulnerable not just to malicious attacks, but also to faulty code. For commercial reasons, companies have been reluctant to open up their code to researchers. But with lives at stake, we need to be allowed to take a peek under the hood.

    Over the past few years several researchers have revealed lethal vulnerabilities in the code that runs some medical implants. The late Barnaby Jack, for example, showed that pacemakers could be “hacked” to deliver lethal electric shocks. Jay Radcliffe demonstrated a way of wirelessly making an implanted insulin pump deliver a lethal dose of insulin.

    But “bugs” in the code are also an issue. Researcher Marie Moe recently discovered this first-hand, when her Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) unexpectedly went into “safe mode”. This caused her heart rate to drop by half, with drastic consequences.

    It took months for Moe to figure out what went wrong with her implant, and this was made harder because the code running in the ICD was proprietary, or closed-source. The reason? Reverse-engineering closed-source code is a crime under various laws, including the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act 1998. It is a violation of copyright, theft of intellectual property, and may be an infringement of patent law.

  • Google releases open-source Cartographer 3D mapping library

    Google has released open-sourced Cartographer, a real-time simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) library in 2D and 3D with ROS (Robot Operating System) support. This technology which works with the open source ROS can be used by developers for many things, such as robots, drones and self-driving cars.

  • Reverse lookups in GNS

    DNS allows to resolve the name of an IP address. This is sometimes called "reverse lookup". In fact, it is actually "normal" resolution of a PTR record. The name of such a record would be, for example, The .arpa TLD is managed by IANA.

    This blogpost is meant to spread ideas that have been exchanged via private email and might be interesting for a broader audience. If you feel like you have useful comments, don't hesitate to do so.

  • California launches nation's first state data portal built on open source

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TuxMachines: Linux Kernel News

Sunday 9th of October 2016 06:51:41 AM

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TuxMachines: Wine and Games

Sunday 9th of October 2016 06:41:14 AM
  • The Wine Stable Release 1.8.5 Is Now Available

    The Wine team released yesterday sixth stable release of 1.8 branch of Wine. Version 1.8.5 has many small changes including 58 bugfixes.

    This stable release contains bugfixes, new features are included in development releases from 1.9 branch.

  • 'Enclave', the 2003 action RPG now has a Linux beta that uses Wine

    'Enclave' [Steam] is another Wine-port from Topware Interactive who promised to bring their older published titles to Linux. I'm totally okay with this, and it's currently in Beta.

    Wine enables us to play a great many things we otherwise wouldn't be able to, so for developers to actually test it and release their old games with a build of Wine that works well, can only be good for us in the long run.

  • Just a heads up, PAYDAY 2 is currently broken again on Linux

    For the second time in only a few months, Overkill has managed to push out an update for PAYDAY 2 [Steam] that has completely broken the Linux version.

    The developers have noted they are aware of it, but no solution has been offered as of right now.

  • 'Noob Squad' is a perfect example of why Valve need to pay more attention to their own store [Ed: Mono.]
  • Linux-Friendly X-Plane 11 Flight Simulator Shipping Later This Year

    X-Plane, one of the most realistic flight simulators that continues to be cross-platform, will be released "this holiday season" and it offers more flying improvements and much better visuals.

    The X-Plane crew announced today, "X-Plane 11 is the detailed, realistic, and modern simulator you’ve been waiting for. And it’s coming this holiday season."

    X-Plane 11 is slated to have a completely redesigned UI, improved 3D high-definition cockpits, new effects, realistic avionics, "living" airports, and a variety of new buildings, roads, and other scenery.

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Reddit: Dance - Sugar 0.110 release video

Sunday 9th of October 2016 05:15:39 AM

Reddit: Anyone else stuck on llvmpipe after upgrading to 4.8 (AMD)?

Sunday 9th of October 2016 05:06:38 AM

Everything works fine on 4.6/4.7 but the second i upgrade to 4.8 my PC is stuck on llvmpipe. Ubuntu 16.04 with padooka PPA r7 370. Tried purging ppa, trying multiple 4.8 kernels, nothing.

submitted by /u/StoleMahShiz
[link] [comments]

LXer: How to use rsync on a Linux VPS

Sunday 9th of October 2016 04:15:48 AM
Rsync is a file-copying tool which allows you to copy or synchronize files and directories on a local or remote system.


Sunday 9th of October 2016 03:19:25 AM

Reddit: Hello /r/Linux, what laptops are you guys using?

Sunday 9th of October 2016 03:17:52 AM

How well does Linux run on your guys' daily driver? What are the specs on those beauties too?!

submitted by /u/The_Great_Danish
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Reddit: Thoughts on Debian Stable Vs. *buntu LTS?

Sunday 9th of October 2016 03:07:22 AM

I used to be hardcore into Debian Stable, but I find I'm more satisfied with *buntu LTS because that's where most of the community support is. I just want to have my stuff up and running in 15 minutes.

I know most of the support is transferable, but some odd reason, I come back to *buntu LTS. Usually the LTS is so stable, I upgrade at the final beta and if I really want something more up to date, I would install backports.

What about you?

submitted by /u/Commodore256
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Reddit: Slides from Linuxcon Europe 2016

Sunday 9th of October 2016 03:06:37 AM

LXer: Some Myths About Linux That Cause New Users To Run Away From Linux

Sunday 9th of October 2016 02:21:26 AM
Yes! You read right. While the world is realizing the power of Linux, on the other hand there are also people who are often found debating in the communities like, Reddit about how bad Linux is due to several problems. Several issues that are raised are actually myths about Linux. So here is a try from LinuxAndUbuntu to cover and clear some of the most talked Linux myths.

LXer: KDE Frameworks 5.27 Released for Plasma 5.8 with New MIME Types Icons, Bug Fixes

Sunday 9th of October 2016 12:27:04 AM
KDE announced today the monthly release of the KDE Frameworks project, a collection of over 70 add-on libraries to the Qt5 GUI (Graphical User Interface) toolkit.

Reddit: Why another CPU option is necessary

Saturday 8th of October 2016 11:05:02 PM

The freedom we get with Linux requires free hardware as well.

Now that even AMD decided to embrace spying technologies similar to vPro, we need an alternative.

Most tasks require the equivalent of an A4 model, or even a modern Celeron, not some state of the art monster CPU.

It shouldn't be that hard for a hardware firm to come up with such a CPU dedicated to privacy minded people. Especially if they put it in a semidecent laptop, lots of people would go for it.

Even attempts like Purism or the old flashed thinkpads have people paying serious money for them, so the market is there!

Let's spread the message that we need such a product!

submitted by /u/Fridaso
[link] [comments]

Reddit: Running Android apps on a x86 Linux OS?

Saturday 8th of October 2016 10:51:24 PM

I am completely new to Linux, having recently installed and played around with Debian.

Since Android runs on the Linux kernel its apps should be able to run on any Linux distribution right? Being able to run Android apps natively would be awesome as there are tons of software. I searched the web and there seems to be a package called Shashlink (and another one) that can do it. But, for a Linux beginner, can anyone tell me how good compatibility is? Which one provides the best experience? Any other important stuff I need to know about running them?

Also, is a distro like Android x86 or Remix OS better to use for this purpose?

submitted by /u/Undertaker17
[link] [comments]

More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.8.4

I'm announcing the release of the 4.8.4 kernel. And yeah, sorry about the quicker releases, I'll be away tomorrow and as they seem to have passed all of the normal testing, I figured it would be better to get them out earlier instead of later. And I like releasing stuff on this date every year... All users of the 4.8 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.8.y git tree can be found at: git:// linux-4.8.y and can be browsed at the normal git web browser: Read more Also: Linux 4.7.10 Linux 4.4.27

New Releases: Budgie, Solus, SalentOS, and Slackel

  • Open-Source Budgie Desktop Sees New Release
    The pet parakeet of the Linux world, Budgie has a new release available for download. in this post we lookout what's new and tell you how you can get it.
  • Solus Linux Making Performance Gains With Its BLAS Configuration
    - Those making use of the promising Solus Linux distribution will soon find their BLAS-based workloads are faster. Solus developer Peter O'Connor tweeted this week that he's found some issues with the BLAS linking on the distribution and he's made fixes for Solus. He also mentioned that he uncovered these BLAS issues by using our Phoronix Test Suite benchmarking software.
  • SalentOS “Luppìu” 1.0 released!
    With great pleasure the team announces the release of SalentOS “Luppìu” 1.0.
  • Slackel "Live kde" 4.14.21
    This release is available in both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, while the 64-bit iso supports booting on UEFI systems. The 64-bit iso images support booting on UEFI systems. The 32-bit iso images support both i686 PAE SMP and i486, non-PAE capable systems. Iso images are isohybrid.

Security News

  • Free tool protects PCs from master boot record attacks [Ed: UEFI has repeatedly been found to be both a detriment to security and enabler of Microsoft lock-in]
    Cisco's Talos team has developed an open-source tool that can protect the master boot record of Windows computers from modification by ransomware and other malicious attacks. The tool, called MBRFilter, functions as a signed system driver and puts the disk's sector 0 into a read-only state. It is available for both 32-bit and 64-bit Windows versions and its source code has been published on GitHub. The master boot record (MBR) consists of executable code that's stored in the first sector (sector 0) of a hard disk drive and launches the operating system's boot loader. The MBR also contains information about the disk's partitions and their file systems. Since the MBR code is executed before the OS itself, it can be abused by malware programs to increase their persistence and gain a head start before antivirus programs. Malware programs that infect the MBR to hide from antivirus programs have historically been known as bootkits -- boot-level rootkits. Microsoft attempted to solve the bootkit problem by implementing cryptographic verification of the bootloader in Windows 8 and later. This feature is known as Secure Boot and is based on the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) -- the modern BIOS.
  • DDOS Attack On Internet Infrastructure
    I hope somebody's paying attention. There's been another big DDOS attack, this time against the infrastructure of the Internet. It began at 7:10 a.m. EDT today against Dyn, a major DNS host, and was brought under control at 9:36 a.m. According to Gizmodo, which was the first to report the story, at least 40 sites were made unreachable to users on the US East Coast. Many of the sites affected are among the most trafficed on the web, and included CNN, Twitter, PayPal, Pinterest and Reddit to name a few. The developer community was also touched, as GitHub was also made unreachable. This event comes on the heels of a record breaking 620 Gbps DDOS attack about a month ago that brought down security expert Brian Krebs' website, KrebsonSecurity. In that attack, Krebs determined the attack had been launched by botnets that primarily utilized compromised IoT devices, and was seen by some as ushering in a new era of Internet security woes.
  • This Is Why Half the Internet Shut Down Today [Update: It’s Getting Worse]
    Twitter, Spotify and Reddit, and a huge swath of other websites were down or screwed up this morning. This was happening as hackers unleashed a large distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on the servers of Dyn, a major DNS host. It’s probably safe to assume that the two situations are related.
  • Major DNS provider Dyn hit with DDoS attack
    Attacks against DNS provider Dyn continued into Friday afternoon. Shortly before noon, the company said it began "monitoring and mitigating a DDoS attack" against its Dyn Managed DNS infrastructure. The attack may also have impacted Managed DNS advanced service "with possible delays in monitoring."
  • What We Know About Friday’s Massive East Coast Internet Outage
    Friday morning is prime time for some casual news reading, tweeting, and general Internet browsing, but you may have had some trouble accessing your usual sites and services this morning and throughout the day, from Spotify and Reddit to the New York Times and even good ol’ For that, you can thank a distributed denial of service attack (DDoS) that took down a big chunk of the Internet for most of the Eastern seaboard. This morning’s attack started around 7 am ET and was aimed at Dyn, an Internet infrastructure company headquartered in New Hampshire. That first bout was resolved after about two hours; a second attack began just before noon. Dyn reported a third wave of attacks a little after 4 pm ET. In all cases, traffic to Dyn’s Internet directory servers throughout the US—primarily on the East Coast but later on the opposite end of the country as well—was stopped by a flood of malicious requests from tens of millions of IP addresses disrupting the system. Late in the day, Dyn described the events as a “very sophisticated and complex attack.” Still ongoing, the situation is a definite reminder of the fragility of the web, and the power of the forces that aim to disrupt it.
  • Either IoT will be secure or the internet will be crippled forever
    First things first a disclaimer. I neither like nor trust the National Security Agency (NSA). I believe them to be mainly engaged in economic spying for the corporate American empire. Glenn Greenwald has clearly proven that in his book No Place to Hide. At the NSA, profit and power come first and I have no fucking clue as to how high they prioritize national security. Having said that, the NSA should hack the Internet of (insecure) Things (IoT) to death. I know Homeland Security and the FBI are investigating where the DDoS of doomsday proportions is coming from and the commentariat is already screaming RUSSIA! But it is really no secret what is enabling this clusterfuck. It’s the Mirai botnet. If you buy a “smart camera” from the Chinese company Hangzhou XiongMai Technologies and do not change the default password, it will be part of a botnet five minutes after you connect it to the internet. We were promised a future where we would have flying cars but we’re living in a future where camera’s, light-bulbs, doorbells and fridges can get you in serious trouble because your home appliances are breaking the law.
  • IoT at the Network Edge
    Fog computing, also known as fog networking, is a decentralized computing infrastructure. Computing resources and application services are distributed in logical, efficient places at any points along the connection from the data source (endpoint) to the cloud. The concept is to process data locally and then use the network for communicating with other resources for further processing and analysis. Data could be sent to a data center or a cloud service. A worthwhile reference published by Cisco is the white paper, "Fog Computing and the Internet of Things: Extend the Cloud to Where the Things Are."
  • Canonical now offers live kernel patching for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users
    Canonical has announced its ‘Livepatch Service’ which any user can enable on their current installations to eliminate the need for rebooting their machine after installing an update for the Linux kernel. With the release of Linux 4.0, users have been able to update their kernel packages without rebooting, however, Ubuntu will be the first distribution to offer this feature for free.
  • ​The Dirty Cow Linux bug: A silly name for a serious problem
    Dirty Cow is a silly name, but it's a serious Linux kernel problem. According to the Red Hat bug report, "a race condition was found in the way the Linux kernel's memory subsystem handled the copy-on-write (COW) breakage of private read-only memory mappings. An unprivileged local user could use this flaw to gain write access to otherwise read-only memory mappings and thus increase their privileges on the system."
  • Ancient Privilege Escalation Bug Haunts Linux
  • October 21, 2016 Is Dirty COW a serious concern for Linux?
  • There is a Dirty Cow in Linux
  • Red Hat Discovers Dirty COW Archaic Linux Kernel Flaw Exploited In The Wild
  • Linux kernel bug being exploited in the wild
  • Update Linux now: Critical privilege escalation security flaw gives hackers full root access
  • Linux kernel bug: DirtyCOW “easyroot” hole and what you need to know
  • 'Most serious' Linux privilege-escalation bug ever discovered
  • New 'Dirty Cow' vulnerability threatens Linux systems
  • Serious Dirty Cow Linux Vulnerability Under Attack
  • Easy-to-exploit rooting flaw puts Linux PCs at risk
  • Linux just patched a vulnerability it's had for 9 years
  • Dirty COW Linux vulnerability has existed for nine years
  • 'Dirty Cow' Linux Vulnerability Found
  • 'Dirty Cow' Linux Vulnerability Found After Nine Years
  • FakeFile Trojan Opens Backdoors on Linux Computers, Except openSUSE
    Malware authors are taking aim at Linux computers, more precisely desktops and not servers, with a new trojan named FakeFile, currently distributed in live attacks. Russian antivirus vendor Dr.Web discovered this new trojan in October. The company's malware analysts say the trojan is spread in the form of an archived PDF, Microsoft Office, or OpenOffice file.

today's howtos