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Updated: 1 hour 57 min ago

LXer: Red Hat and Integration Take Center Stage at OpenStack Summit

Saturday 11th of November 2017 03:52:17 AM
The release brings a few things to the table that should help make the platform, which has a reputation for being difficult to deploy, more agile and easier to use. Based on "Pike," the latest upstream plain vanilla release, the fedora company's new version notably allows OpenStack services to run on containers.

Reddit: Dummy output! (just a discussion)

Saturday 11th of November 2017 03:26:19 AM

This problem seems to be more common in linux distributions or so I think. I've searched many forums and there are many cases like this too, yet many are still unresolved. But sometimes, it corrects automatically overtime (or a Kernel update). Why is this more common in linux? Have you come across this?

submitted by /u/marcel_the_m0nkey
[link] [comments]

LXer: Red Hat CTO Discusses What's Next for IT Innovation

Saturday 11th of November 2017 01:57:55 AM
VIDEO: Chris Wright, VP and CTO at Red Hat talks about the future direction Red Hat Enterprise Linux and the next exciting areas of IT innovation.

Reddit: Need help playing dvds on Ubuntu 17.10

Saturday 11th of November 2017 01:44:53 AM

I have ubuntu restricted extras, libdvdcss4, ms ttf. Possible not recognizing dvd drive getting this sudo /usr/share/doc/libdvdread4/install-css.sh sudo: /usr/share/doc/libdvdread4/install-css.sh: command not found im all ears thanks

submitted by /u/speakhyroglyphically
[link] [comments]

Reddit: Linux Action News 26 | Jupiter Broadcasting

Saturday 11th of November 2017 12:13:45 AM

LXer: Getting started with Kubernetes

Saturday 11th of November 2017 12:03:33 AM
One of today's most promising emerging technologies is paring containers with cluster management software such as Docker Swarm, Apache Mesos, and the popular Kubernetes. Kubernetes allows you to create a portable and scalable application deployment that can be scheduled, managed, and maintained easily.read more

Reddit: Inspired by the package "TheFuck" I wrote a simple function that will (sometimes) fix the command entered.

Friday 10th of November 2017 11:55:01 PM

I'm fairly new too Linux and wanted too practice creating a function. What do you guys think?

Placed in my .bashrc so any time I type out fuck it will correct the command:

export PROMPT_COMMAND="history -a; history -c; history -r; $PROMPT_COMMAND" fuck(){ SHIT=$(tail -1 ~/.bash_history) $SHIT 2> text.txt FUCK=$(awk 'FNR == 2 { print $2 }' text.txt | cut -d\' -f2) BITCH=$(cut -d ' ' -f 2-99 ~/.bash_history | tail -1) $FUCK $BITCH rm text.txt } submitted by /u/Neathh
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TuxMachines: Software: GNU Time, Lizard, NetworkManager, Notes Up, SReview

Friday 10th of November 2017 11:01:14 PM

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Reddit: Font Finder: Implementation of TypeCatcher in Rust + GTK3

Friday 10th of November 2017 10:57:04 PM

Here's a new application I've created for all the desktop Linux users out there: Font Finder[1]. Spent three days on the project. It's a GTK3 application written with Rust[2] for browsing and installing fonts from Google's font archive[3]. Serves as an alternative to TypeCatcher[4], which is implemented in Python. Sorry for not writing it with JavaScript + Electron!

Requires Rust 1.21 for compiling, and as it makes use of GTK and WebKit, it also requires libwebkit3-gtk-devel and libgtk-3-devel as dependencies.

[1] https://github.com/mmstick/fontfinder

[2] https://www.rust-lang.org/en-US/

[3] https://fonts.google.com/

[4] https://github.com/andrewsomething/typecatcher/

submitted by /u/mmstick
[link] [comments]

TuxMachines: Linux. the Linux Foundation, and Graphics

Friday 10th of November 2017 10:55:51 PM
  • SoundWire Subsystem Revised For The Linux Kernel

    SoundWire is being proposed again for being introduced to the Linux kernel as a new soundsystem. 

    Back in October 2016 is when Intel developers originally proposed SoundWire support for Linux. SoundWire is a low-power, two-pin bus that's been around since 2014 for supporting multiple audio streams and embedded control/commands. This specification is developed by MIPI. More details on the SoundWire specification via MIPI.org. 

  • The Linux Foundation Open Source Summit: the importance of a diverse community

    The Linux Foundation Open Source Summit was held recently in Prague. During the Summit the important issue of diversity in the opensource and tech communities was addressed.

    It was inspiring to hear from young expert speakers about the opportunities and challenges they face in these communities. Similarly the topic of gender diversity was also discussed.

  • Hyperledger Goes to School

    Hyperledger , the blockchain reference framework launched by the Linux Foundation , is nearly two years old. It is starting to gain commercial traction, underpinning projects such as Everledger , the blockchain to track the provenance of high-value items like diamonds.

    Now that Hyperledger is getting more popular, developers and businesspeople alike will want to get more acquainted with it. To that end, the Linux Foundation has partnered with edX to launch an online course. Founded by Harvard and MIT, edX is one of the many Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) providers on the web.

  • Most Blockchain Projects Go Bust

    Deloitte analyzed GitHub, the popular open-source code repository and collaboration platform, to examine the state of the blockchain development scene. GitHub boasts 24 million users and over 68 million projects.

  • OpenGL Atomic Counters Land For R600 Gallium3D

    Support for atomic counters have landed within the R600 Gallium3D driver that continues to be used by pre-GCN graphics cards from the Radeon HD 2000 series through the Radeon HD 6000 series.

  • Geometry Shader Support For RadeonSI's NIR Back-End

    AMD this year has been developing a NIR back-end for the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver in part for supporting the ARB_gl_spirv extension in being able to re-use/share some code with the RADV Vulkan driver that obviously already deals with SPIR-V and relies on NIR for its intermediate representation. Now support for geometry shaders is coming to RadeonSI NIR.

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TuxMachines: Programming: Practical Functional Programming,Goodbye to C

Friday 10th of November 2017 10:49:13 PM
  • Practical Functional Programming

    40 years ago, on October 17th, 1977, the Turing Award was presented to John Backus for his contribution to the design of high-level programming systems, most notably the Fortran programming language. All Turing Award winners are given the opportunity to present a lecture on a topic of their choice during the year in which they receive the award. As the creator of the Fortran programming language, one may have expected Backus to lecture on the benefits of Fortran and future developments in the language. Instead, he gave a lecture entitled Can programming be liberated from the Von Neumann style? in which he criticized some of the mainstream languages of the day, including Fortran, for their shortcomings. He also proposed an alternative: a functional style of programming.

  • The long goodbye to C

    I was thinking a couple of days ago about the new wave of systems languages now challenging C for its place at the top of the systems-programming heap – Go and Rust, in particular. I reached a startling realization – I have 35 years of experience in C. I write C code pretty much every week, but I can no longer remember when I last started a new project in C!

  • Ten interesting features from various modern languages
  • 7 Open-Source Test Automation Frameworks

    As we enter the last quarter of 2017, TestProject’s team decided to round up the best open-source test automation frameworks out there, to help you choose the right one for you!

    Here are the pros and cons of 7 different open-source test automation frameworks.

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TuxMachines: Desktop: Galaxy Smartphones and MacBook Pro

Friday 10th of November 2017 10:27:37 PM
  • Linux is coming to Samsung Galaxy smartphones

    The idea of putting Linux on a smartphone is not new but the fact that Samsung is testing the operating system on its smartphones is.

    Samsung made the announcement that it would be possible to run Linux on a Galaxy smartphone at SDC 2017 earlier this year.

  • Linux Distros On Smartphone: The First “Linux On Galaxy” Demo Is Here

    Technology companies involved in desktop and mobile space have been trying hard to achieve a perfect sense of convergence. Microsoft has been doing it with the help of Continuum; Apple has its own approach to make the iPad workflow more PC-like. Along the same lines, Samsung launched the new DeX dock with its flagship Galaxy S8.

  • Apple's Late-2016 MacBook Pro Is Still A Wreck With Linux

    At the end of last year we had a brief encounter with the new at the time MacBook Pro with Touchbar to see how well it would run under Linux. It was a mess with SSD difficulties, non-working touchpad/keyboard, WiFi issues, and more. It's a bit better using the newly-released Ubuntu 17.10, but would still advise against Linux for the Apple MacBook Pro Late-2016 model / Mac-A5C67F76ED83108C / MacBookPro 13,3 model.

read more

TuxMachines: Servers: OpenHPC, Containerd, Prometheus

Friday 10th of November 2017 10:25:59 PM
  • What is OpenHPC?

    High performance computing (HPC)—the aggregation of computers into clusters to increase computing speed and power—relies heavily on the software that connects and manages the various nodes in the cluster. Linux is the dominant HPC operating system, and many HPC sites expand upon the operating system's capabilities with different scientific applications, libraries, and other tools.

    As HPC began developing, that there was considerable duplication and redundancy among the HPC sites compiling HPC software became apparent, and sometimes dependencies between the different software components made installations cumbersome. The OpenHPC project was created in response to these issues. OpenHPC is a community-based effort to solve common tasks in HPC environments by providing documentation and building blocks that can be combined by HPC sites according to their needs. 

  • Containerd Brings More Container Runtime Options for Kubernetes

    A container runtime is software that executes containers and manages container images on a node. Today, the most widely known container runtime is Docker, but there are other container runtimes in the ecosystem, such as rkt, containerd, and lxd. Docker is by far the most common container runtime used in production Kubernetes environments, but Docker’s smaller offspring, containerd, may prove to be a better option. This post describes using containerd with Kubernetes.

  • Prometheus 2.0 Arrives with a Speedy New Local Storage Engine

    Improved local storage is at the heart of the new release of Prometheus 2.0, according to Fabian Reinartz, a CoreOS software engineer and a core developer of the Prometheus monitoring system.

    With distributed system coordination software such as Kubernetes and Mesos, monitored environments have become increasingly more dynamic, Reinartz pointed out in a blog post. The motioning software needed its own dedicated storage to ensure responsiveness in these dynamic environments.

    Though Prometheus 1.6 introduced auto-tuning capabilities, the team has been working on a more performant time-series database. “It’s just way more reliable and faster. Ideally, you don’t want to have to reconfigure all the time, so Prometheus just responds to change in demands, so there are way fewer knobs to turn for the people running it,” Reinartz said in an interview.

  • Mesosphere DC/OS Container Platform Now Available through Azure Marketplace

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LXer: Researchers find almost EVERY computer with an Intel Skylake and above CPU can be owned via USB

Friday 10th of November 2017 10:09:11 PM
The Intel Management Engine (IME) is a component of virtually every Intel CPU released after 2008. Think of it as a CPU on top of a CPU; it does tasks separate from the main operating system while the computer is in use. Intel argues that it can be used to do remote administration tasks, although the likes of the EFF have long argued that having a “black box” that can control networking and hardware, even when the computer is switched off, represents a major security and privacy risk.

TuxMachines: Security: Intel Back Door, Hacking a Fingerprint Biometric, Dashlane, Vault 8, Cryptojacking, MongoDB and More

Friday 10th of November 2017 10:02:44 PM
  • Recent Intel Chipsets Have A Built-In Hidden Computer, Running Minix With A Networking Stack And A Web Server

    The "Ring-3" mentioned there refers to the level of privileges granted to the ME system. As a Google presentation about ME (pdf) explains, operating systems like GNU/Linux run on Intel chips at Ring 0 level; Ring-3 ("minus 3") trumps everything above -- include the operating system -- and has total control over the hardware. Throwing a Web server and a networking stack in there too seems like a really bad idea. Suppose there was some bug in the ME system that allowed an attacker to take control? Funny you should ask; here's what we learned earlier this year...

    [...]

     Those don't seem unreasonable requests given how serious the flaws in the ME system have been, and probably will be again in the future. It also seems only fair that people should be able to control fully a computer that they own -- and that ought to include the Minix-based computer hidden within.

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  • “Game Over!” — Intel’s Hidden, MINIX-powered ME Chip Can Be Hacked Over USB

    Even the creator of MINIX operating system didn’t know that his for-education operating system is on almost every Intel-powered computer.

  • Researchers find almost EVERY computer with an Intel Skylake and above CPU can be owned via USB

     

    Turns out they were right. Security firm Positive Technologies reports being able to execute unsigned code on computers running the IME through USB. The fully fleshed-out details of the attack are yet to be known, but from what we know, it’s bad.

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  • Hacking a Fingerprint Biometric
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  • Dashlane Password Manager Now Supports Linux [Ed: But why would anyone with a clue choose to upload his/her passwords?]

    Dashlane, the popular password manager, now supports Linux (and ChromeOS and Microsoft Edge) thanks to new web extension and web app combination.

  • Source Code For CIA’s Spying Tool Hive Released By Wikileaks: Vault 8

    From November 9, Wikileaks has started a new series named Vault 8. As a part of this series, the first leak contains the source code and analysis for Hive software project. Later, the other leaks of this series are expected to contain the source code for other tools as well.

  • Cryptojacking found on 2496 online stores

    Cryptojacking - running crypto mining software in the browser of unsuspecting visitors - is quickly spreading around the web. And the landgrab extends to online stores. The infamous CoinHive software was detected today on 2496 e-commerce sites.

  • 2,500+ Websites Are Now “Cryptojacking” To Use Your CPU Power And Mine Cryptocurrency
  • MongoDB update plugs security hole and sets sights on the enterprise

    Document database-flinger MongoDB has long positioned itself as the dev's best friend, but after ten years it is now fluffing itself up for the enterprise.

    The firm, which went public just last month and hopes to earn up to $220m, has now launched the latest version of its database, which aims to appeal to these bigger customers.

  • How AV can open you to attacks that otherwise wouldn’t be possible [Ed: Any proprietary software put on top of any other software (FOSS included) is a threat and a possible back door]

    Antivirus programs, in many cases, make us safer on the Internet. Other times, they open us to attacks that otherwise wouldn't be possible. On Friday, a researcher documented an example of the latter—a vulnerability he found in about a dozen name-brand AV programs that allows attackers who already have a toehold on a targeted computer to gain complete system control.

    AVGater, as the researcher is calling the vulnerability, works by relocating malware already put into an AV quarantine folder to a location of the attacker's choosing. Attackers can exploit it by first getting a vulnerable AV program to quarantine a piece of malicious code and then moving it into a sensitive directory such as C:\Windows or C:\Program Files, which normally would be off-limits to the attacker. Six of the affected AV programs have patched the vulnerability after it was privately reported. The remaining brands have yet to fix it, said Florian Bogner, a Vienna, Austria-based security researcher who gets paid to hack businesses so he can help them identify weaknesses in their networks.

  • Estonia arrests suspected FSB agent accused of “computer-related crime”

    Estonian authorities announced this week that they had recently arrested a Russian man suspected of being an agent of the Federal Security Service (FSB) who was allegedly planning "computer-related crime."

    The 20-year-old man, whose identity was not made public, was arrested last weekend in the Estonian border city of Narva as he was trying to return to Russia.

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TuxMachines: today's howtos

Friday 10th of November 2017 09:59:19 PM

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TuxMachines: What Red Hat is, Fedora 27 Release Imminent

Friday 10th of November 2017 09:58:13 PM

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More in Tux Machines

Software: VirtualBox, TeX Live Cockpit, Mailspring, Qt, Projects, and Maintainers

  • VirtualBox 5.2.2 Brings Linux 4.14 Fixes, HiDPI UI Improvements
    The Oracle developers behind VM VirtualBox have released a new maintenance build in the VirtualBox 5.2 series that is a bit more exciting than their usual point releases.
  • TeX Live Cockpit
    I have been working quite some time on a new front end for the TeX Live Manager tlmgr. Early versions have leaked into TeX Live, but the last month or two has seen many changes in tlmgr itself, in particular support for JSON output. These changes were mostly driven by the need (or ease) of the new frontend: TLCockpit.
  • Mailspring – A New Open Source Cross-Platform Email Client
    Mailspring is a fork of the now discontinued Nylas Mail client. It does, however, offer a much better performance, and is built with a native C++ sync engine instead of JavaScript. According to the development team, the company is sunsetting further development of Mailspring. Mailspring offers virtually all the best features housed in Nylas Mail, and thanks to its native C++ sync engine it uses fewer dependencies which results in less lag and a reduction in RAM usage by 50% compared to Nylas Mail.
  • Removing Qt 4 from Debian testing (aka Buster): some statistics
    We started filing bugs around September 9. That means roughly 11 weeks, which gives us around 8 packages fixed a week, aka 1.14 packages per day. Not bad at all!
  • Products Over Projects
    However, projects are not the only way of funding and organizing software development. For instance, many companies that sell software as a product or a service do not fund or organize their core product/platform development in the form of projects. Instead, they run product development and support using near-permanent teams for as long as the product is sold in the market. The budget may vary year on year but it is generally sufficient to fund a durable, core development organization continuously for the life of the product. Teams are funded to work on a particular business problem or offering over a period of time; with the nature work being defined by a business problem to address rather than a set of functions to deliver. We call this way of working as “product-mode” and assert that it is not necessary to be building a software product in order to fund and organize software development like this.
  • Why we never thank open source maintainers

    It is true that some of you guys can build a tool in a hackathon, but maintaining a project is a lot more difficult than building a project. Most of the time they are not writing code, but [...]

today's howtos

Tizen News

Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.