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Updated: 1 hour 22 min ago

Phoronix: Intel's i965 Mesa Driver Finishes Off Another OpenGL 4.5 Extension (ARB_cull_distance)

Sunday 15th of May 2016 12:43:22 PM
While the Intel i965 Mesa driver is currently at OpenGL 3.3 while waiting for the FP64 support to land for hitting OpenGL 4.2, various other OpenGL 4.3/4.4/4.5 extensions continue to move along for this open-source graphics driver...

Phoronix: Gallium3D Nine Gets Numerous Improvements Ahead Of Next Mesa Release

Sunday 15th of May 2016 12:32:07 PM
Axel Davy who has been one of the prolific developers involved on the "Nine" Gallium3D state tracker for providing a basic Direct3D 9 implementation under Linux has sent in a set of 39 patches that he hopes to land in time for next month's Mesa release...

LXer: Automotive Linux, 8-bit social, deep learning with Amazon, and more news

Sunday 15th of May 2016 11:37:31 AM
In this week's edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at Automotive Linux, Social 8-Bit, Deep Learning with neural networks, and more! Open source news roundup for May 7 - 14, 2016.

LXer: Bodhi 3.2.1 Screenshot Tour

Sunday 15th of May 2016 09:43:09 AM
This is an unscheduled bug fix release. The 3.2.0 release contained the wrong kernel headers by default on the non-Legacy ISO images and the default elementary theme was improperly configured. This release also addresses a bug with multi-monitor support in Moksha. These fixes are already present on installed Bodhi systems for those who are keeping their systems up to date.

TuxMachines: Kernel Space/Linux

Sunday 15th of May 2016 08:52:59 AM
  • Keynote: Linus Torvalds in Conversation with Dirk Hohndel
  • ZFS On Linux 0.6.5.7 Brings Linux 4.6 Support, Bug Fixes

    ZFS On Linux 0.6.5.7 was released this week as the newest version of the ZFS file-system code for Linux.

  • Touch on Linux is a little Touchy

    Before you come bashing at me saying “East or West, Keyboard is the best” or “Command Line! Command Line! Command Line!”, I just want to interate here – YES, keyboard is very important for productive tasks. But what about when you just want to use your hybrid device (which are slowly starting to dominate the market) to read a book? Or watch a movie? Or do some GUI based task – like even editing a video (which is a fairly heavy task but can be an excellent use case for touch based interaction)? Yes, Linux is, in my humble opinon, much more flexible than Windows when it comes to doing non-touch tasks like coding, or writing documents (which is exactly why inspite of all that Windows-praising, I am typing this on LibreOffice in Ubuntu), but let us not forget, touch is slowly but steadily becoming the future of interacting with our personal devices. Maybe it will never be the most productive way of doing so, but it sure is the most natural way of doing that. I think Linux should not find itself late to the party of touch-based interaction.

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TuxMachines: Leftovers: Software

Sunday 15th of May 2016 08:52:06 AM
  • Discover Ring, a Secure Cross-Platform Alternative to Skype

    If you’re on Linux, you’ll be well aware that the Skype client sucks hard as it never packs as many features like the version of the app on other operating systems and hasn’t been updated since 2014.

    [...]

    The application is available on desktops via the main platforms (Linux, Windows, and OSX) — other systems require compiling from source — while on mobile, it’s accessible through Android and Windows Mobile and supports voice, video, and conferencing calls.

  • Caravel data visualization

    One aspect of the heavily hyped Internet of Things (IoT) that can easily get overlooked is that each of the Things one hooks up to the Internet invariably spews out a near non-stop stream of data. While commercial IoT users—such as utility companies—generally have a well-established grasp of what data interests them and how to process it, the DIY crowd is better served by flexible tools that make exploring and transforming data easy. Airbnb maintains an open-source Python utility called Caravel that provides such tools. There are many alternatives, of course, but Caravel does a good job at ingesting data and smoothly molding it into nice-looking interactive graphs—with a few exceptions.

  • SSH Is For Dummies Too!

    If you’ve been hanging around the Linux ecosystem for any length of time, you’ve most likely heard about SSH. For those who may not already know, SSH is a secure shell that allows you to log into any computer, anywhere in the world, that is running an SSH server. You might think that it’s just for system administrators and serious Linux nerds, though. Wrong! SSH is actually super easy to get setup and it can be a very powerful tool, even if you only have two computers running on a small home network. Once you get the hang of using it, you may find yourself wondering how you ever got along without it.

  • Parental Control App Timekpr (Fork) 0.3.6 Released With Ubuntu 16.04 Support

    The Timekpr development stopped a while back, but it was later continued with a fork, called Timekpr-Revived, which works with recent Ubuntu versions.

  • [Older] Treat regular expressions as code, not magic
  • How to Install the Beautiful Arc GTK Theme on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
  • Transposing rows and columns: 3 methods
  • How to set up system locale on CentOS 7

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TuxMachines: Leftovers: Gaming

Sunday 15th of May 2016 08:51:24 AM

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TuxMachines: Distributions News

Sunday 15th of May 2016 08:51:07 AM

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TuxMachines: Hardware/Linux

Sunday 15th of May 2016 08:49:24 AM

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TuxMachines: Leftovers: OSS

Sunday 15th of May 2016 08:47:56 AM
  • Follow Up: Linksys WRT Routers Won't Block Open Source Firmware, Despite FCC Rules

    Is the suggestion that the Doppler weather radar in use at airports is less important than getting cat pictures from the comfort of your couch and not having to run an extra Ethernet cable? Because Delta Flight 191 is why these airport Doppler weather radar systems exist at all. Do we punish before or after the crash? As well I don't think there is an appreciation for just how hard it is to find malfunctioning transmitters: it can be done but with significant amounts of work. The FCC is not funded for this level of enforcement right now. Everyone must share the very finite electromagnetic spectrum. I don't have a problem giving life and safety critical systems priority over cat videos.

    As a quick experiment locate your WiFi router and check the verbiage. I'm sure everyone has seen the part 15 text but probably never paid attention to it. You will find This device may not cause harmful interference as well as this device must accept any interference received. That's because the weather radar, by design, gets to break you but you don't get to break it.

  • Reflections: The ecosystem is moving

    At Open Whisper Systems, we've been developing open source "consumer-facing" software for the past four years. We want to share some of the things we've learned while doing it.

  • The Evolution of Open Source

    For those who entered the IT industry in the late 2000s, open source software is part of the norm. For them, there isn’t a time when open source software was not free and available to everyone, and permeating through almost every facet of technology.

    But those who have been with open source from the beginning know that such was not always the case. As open source stands at the brink of technological breakthroughs, we remember its past and look forward to its promising future.

    [...]

    By the 1990s to 2000s a new kind of movement emerged. Linus Torvalds created the Linux kernel and because of it, more people were able to use open source operating systems and improve them to a level that was competitive with proprietary platforms.

    Unlike the programmers of Stallman’s time, Torvalds and his peers’ primary motivations for moving open source forward were not moral but functional. They viewed it as the more efficient way to code, and way less expensive than its proprietary counterparts. Despite this industry-aligned motivation and the developments that arose from it, open sourcing was still a much debated issue. Many a programmer had to battle with giants like Microsoft for using open source software.

  • PixelSynth — JavaScript-based Chrome Experiment Converts Your Images Into Music

    Ever imagined how your picture will “sound” if converted into music?

  • In search of a home for Thunderbird

    For fans of Thunderbird, the repeated back-and-forth from Mozilla leadership can be a source of frustration on its own, but it probably does not help that Mozilla has started multiple other non-browser projects (such as ChatZilla, Raindrop, Grendel, and Firefox Hello) over the years while insisting that Thunderbird was a distraction from Firefox. Although it might seem like Mozilla management displays an inconsistent attitude toward messaging and other non-web application projects, each call for Mozilla to rid itself of Thunderbird has also highlighted the difficulty of maintaining Thunderbird and Firefox in the same engineering and release infrastructure.

  • Enterprise NoSQL Database for the IoT Becomes Open Source

    Riak TS, an enterprise-grade NoSQL database optimized for Internet of Things (IoT), recently upgraded to version 1.3. The Riak TS now has a free open source version for IoT developers, in addition to a more robust Riak TS Enterprise version.

  • Why OpenBSD Is Important To Me

    The US government has chosen to attack everyone's privacy, US citizen and world citizen alike, in the name of attacking the privacy of terrorists. The government view is that privacy is an impediment to keeping us safe from physical harm. Tragically, they've thrown the baby out with the bathwater--we want to be safe from physical harm so that we can engage with society as free citizens with the maximum possible liberty...putting us in a digital prison, where all of our communication is subject to the whim of government review is the opposite of keeping us safe, its a devastating attack on our freedom.

  • Physicists ≠ Software Developers

    Nevertheless, I really think that being a physicist is not an excuse for not following good programming style and practise when working with others, especially given the large number of learning resources currently available online. I am especially fond of two non-profit projects that focus on providing resources and organizing events to improve computing skills in scientific research. One is lead by Software Carpentry and the other is lead by Mozilla Science Lab. There you can find some nicely curated lessons on basic software development practices.

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TuxMachines: FSF/GNU

Sunday 15th of May 2016 08:46:31 AM
  • GCC 6.1 Compiler Optimization Level Benchmarks: -O0 To -Ofast + FLTO

    Here are some extra GCC 6.1 compiler benchmarks to share this weekend, complementing the recent GCC 4.9 vs. GCC 5 vs. GCC 6 comparison and the GCC 6.1 vs. Clang 3.9 compiler comparison.

  • LinuxFest Northwest 2016: From TPP to saving WiFi, the FSF fights for you
  • Savannah suffering networking problems

    Last Friday May 6th Savannah was moved to new hosting in the same datacenter with many various assorted related and unrelated changes. Since that time there have been wide spread reports of networking problems. The FSF admins are aware of the problem and are trying to resolve it.

  • Enforcement and compliance for the GPL and similar licenses

    The Free Software Legal & Licensing Workshop (LLW) is a three-day event held every year for legal professionals (and aficionados) who work in the realm of free and open-source software (FOSS). It is organized by the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) and, this year, the event was held in Barcelona (Spain), April 13-15. The topics covered during the event ranged from determining what constitutes authorship, how to attribute it, and what is copyrightable, to the complexity of licenses and how to make them more accessible for potential licensees lacking in legal background. In addition, license enforcement and compliance were discussed, with a particular focus on how the GPL and related licenses have done in court.

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TuxMachines: Security Leftovers

Sunday 15th of May 2016 08:44:44 AM
  • Replacing /dev/urandom

    The kernel's random-number generator (RNG) has seen a great deal of attention over the years; that is appropriate, given that its proper functioning is vital to the security of the system as a whole. During that time, it has acquitted itself well. That said, there are some concerns about the RNG going forward that have led to various patches aimed at improving both randomness and performance. Now there are two patch sets that significantly change the RNG's operation to consider.

  • Mozilla asks the FBI for details of Tor vulnerability that could also affect Firefox

    Mozilla is fighting to force the FBI to disclose details of a vulnerability in the Tor web browser. The company fears that the same vulnerability could affect Firefox, and wants to have a chance to patch it before details are made public.

    The vulnerability was exploited by FBI agents to home in on a teacher who was accessing child pornography. Using a "network investigative technique", the FBI was able to identify the man from Vancouver, but Mozilla is concerned that it could also be used by bad actors.

    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the government says that it should be under no obligation to disclose details of the vulnerability to Mozilla ahead of anyone else. But the company has filed a brief with a view to forcing the FBI's hand. The argument is that users should be kept protected from known flaws by allowing software companies to patch them.

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LXer: Ubuntu-Based Exton|OS Linux Distribution Now Ships with MATE 1.14, VLC 2.2.3

Sunday 15th of May 2016 07:48:47 AM
Earlier this week, we reported on the release of a new build of the Ubuntu-based Exton|OS Linux distribution, version 160512, which has been rebased on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

LXer: Top programmer describes Android’s nuts and bolts in Oracle v. Google

Sunday 15th of May 2016 05:54:25 AM
In the late morning, Simon Phipps took the stand. Phipps, who worked at Sun for 10 years before it was purchased, was the company's Chief Open Source Officer. He testified that no one at Sun ever took action to stop other projects that used Java APIs, including GNU Classpath and Apache Harmony.

LXer: Civilization VI for Linux, Dungeons & Robots release, and more gaming news

Sunday 15th of May 2016 04:00:03 AM
Hello, open gaming fans! In this week's edition, we take a look at Civilization VI for Linux, Dungeons & Robots release, and new games out for Linux.Open gaming roundup for May 7 - 13, 2016read more

Reddit: Help - How do I Get Started With Linux?

Sunday 15th of May 2016 03:23:31 AM

So I have VirtualBox installed, I am somewhat sure that I have Ubuntu at least downloaded on my machine (mac - El Captian) but I have no idea what to do from here.

Honestly TMLI5 and help me out here.

submitted by /u/elephantovercoat
[link] [comments]

LXer: AryaLinux 2016.04 Screencast and Screenshots

Sunday 15th of May 2016 02:05:41 AM
This version of AryaLinux primarily focuses on creating a stable from-scratch system and eliminating as many small nuances as possible that sum up to a not-so happy build experience: Updated all packages to the latest development of LFS and the current development version of BLFS systemd. Upgraded MATE to 1.12.0. Fixed a lot of broken features with alps like selfupdate, clean and updatescripts.

More in Tux Machines

Rust 1.9

  • Announcing Rust 1.9
    The Rust team is happy to announce the latest version of Rust, 1.9. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.
  • Rust 1.9 Released
    Rust 1.9 brings controlled unwinding support, support for deprecation warnings, new targets (MIPS Linux Musl C library and i586 Windows MSVC), compile-time improvements, more library stabilization work, and new Cargo features.

Announcing the Open Source License API

Over the last 19 years, the Open Source Initiative (OSI) has been the steward of the Open Source Definition (or OSD), establishing a common language when discussing what it means to be an Open Source license, and a list of licenses which are known to be compatible with the OSD. This is taken to its logic next step this year, with the OSI providing a machine readable publication of OSI approved licenses at api.opensource.org. This will allow third parties to become license-aware, and give organizations the ability to clearly determine if a license is, in fact, an Open Source license, from the authoritative source regarding Open Source licenses, the OSI. Read more

Leftovers: Gaming

Win for APIs and FOSS (Android Case)

  • Google beats Oracle at trial: Jury finds Android is “fair use”
    Following a two-week trial, a federal jury concluded Thursday that Google's Android operating system does not infringe Oracle-owned copyrights because its re-implementation of 37 Java APIs is protected by "fair use." The verdict was reached after three days of deliberations. "Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, listen to your verdict as it will stand recorded," said the court clerk, before polling each of the ten men and women on the jury. There was only one question on the special verdict form, asking if Google's use of the Java APIs was a "fair use" under copyright law. The jury unanimously answered "yes," in Google's favor. The verdict ends the trial, which began earlier this month. If Oracle had won, the same jury would have gone into a "damages phase" to determine how much Google should pay. Because Google won, the trial is over. "I salute you for your extreme hard work in this case," said US District Judge William Alsup, who has overseen the litigation since 2010. "With the thanks of your United States District Court, you are now discharged. I would like to come in the jury room and shake each of your hands individually." Four of the ten jurors declined to comment to reporters gathered in the hallway. The other six went out through a back exit. "We're grateful for the jury's verdict," said Google lead lawyer Robert Van Nest before getting into the elevator with Google's in-house lawyers. "That's it." Oracle attorneys had no comment.
  • Google wins Oracle copyright fight over Android code
    Today, a jury in California's Northern District federal court declared that Google's use of copyright-protected code in Android was fair use, freeing it of any liability. Oracle, which controls the copyright on the code, had been seeking $9 billion for the use of the code. The case centers around an API developed by Java and owned by Oracle, which allows outside programs to easily interact with Java programs. Android uses the same API, and in 2014 a federal appeals court ruled that Oracle has a valid copyright claim on the API code, potentially putting Google on the hook for billions of dollars in damages. (The Supreme Court declined to hear the appeal.) In the latest round, Google argued that Android's reimplementation of the API constituted fair use, which would allow use of the code without invalidating Oracle's copyright. Ultimately, the jury found that case convincing.