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Updated: 42 min 15 sec ago

TuxMachines: Graphics: AMDKFD, XWayland, RADV, Radeon Polaris

Friday 9th of February 2018 08:24:34 AM
  • AMDKFD GPUVM Support Updated For Radeon Discrete GPUs

    Many of you have been anxious to get ROCm/OpenCL compute working with the open-source Radeon Linux driver on modern GPUs while using a mainline kernel and that day continues inching closer.

    That long sought after goal should be achieved for Linux 4.17 and there are updated AMDKFD patches now available that work in that direction. But as noted previously, the Linux 4.17 mainline paired with working ROCm/OpenCL will initially be just for select GPUs while hardware like Vega will likely end up needing more time before it's running off a mainline kernel for GPGPU compute.

  • XWayland Gets Initial Support For EGLStreams To Support NVIDIA's Driver

    With the NVIDIA proprietary driver continuing to only support EGLStreams for their Wayland support until the new "Unix device memory allocator" project pans out, one of the big limitations has been no XWayland support for running X11 applications. Fortunately, that's now changing.

    Besides needing a Wayland compositor patched with EGLStreams support in order to work with the NVIDIA proprietary Linux driver, there hasn't been XWayland support with this approach. But Red Hat's Lyude Paul today published initial support for using XWayland with EGLStreams.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Now Exposes VK_EXT_external_memory_host

    RADV, the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver, now has external memory host support via the VK_EXT_external_memory_host extension that was recently introduced in the Vulkan 1.0.66 update.

  • WattMan Support Coming For Radeon Polaris GPUs On Linux

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LXer: RISC-V gains momentum as it moves from MCUs to Linux-friendly SoCs

Friday 9th of February 2018 08:21:22 AM
The open source RISC-V ISA has evolved quickly into silicon, thanks to help from companies like SiFive and Microsemi. SiFive’s HiFive Unleashed board should arrive less than two years before SiFive announced its first Linux-driven Freedom SoCs. It’s been two years since the open source RISC-V architecture emerged from computer labs at UC Berkeley ....

TuxMachines: Red Hat: OpenShift, Mac Asay, and Fedora Project

Friday 9th of February 2018 08:14:09 AM

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TuxMachines: KDE: Slimbook, Decade of Plasma, Kubuntu Bionic and More

Friday 9th of February 2018 08:11:47 AM
  • Who, wha, FOSDEM?

    Underneath the Konqui Pinebook is my KDE Slimbook. Someone was handing out Nopetopus stickers; I wish I had gotten more. My Slimbook is starting to look a little beat-up — which is good, from a Hitch-Hikers-Guide-to-the-Galaxy point of view, since it’s been baked under the suns of Kakrafoon^WAlmeria, shivered in the snows of Allosymanius Syneca^W^WBrussels. At the KDE booth we were also could show a second-generation machine: the KDE Slimbook II (in Spanish, their English site doesn’t mention it yet). A faster, brighter version of the Free-Software friendly laptop with Linux and KDE Plasma pre-installed. This generation is a little more angled / chunky than the previous generation. It might get fewer “why do you guys have Macbooks .. oh, hey” comments. So an aluminum but not-quite-clamshell look might be more distinctive.

  • A Decade of Plasma

    I realised that it’s now a decade of KDE releasing its Plasma desktop.  The KDE 4 release event was in January 2008.  Google were kind enough to give us their office space and smoothies and hot tubs to give some talks and plan a way forward.

    The KDE 4 release has gained something of a poor reputation, at the time we still shipped Kubuntu with KDE 3 and made a separate unsupported release for Plasma, but I remember it being perfectly useable and notable for being the foundation that would keep KDE software alive.  It had been clear for sometime that Kicker and the other elements of the KDE 3 desktop were functional but unlikely to gain much going forward.  When Qt 4 was announced back in (I’m pretty sure) 2004 Akademy in Ludwigsberg it was seen as a chance to bring KDE’s desktop back up to date and leap forward.  It took 4 long years and to keep community momentum going we had to release even if we did say it would eat your babies.

  • Heading out of winter and into Spring

    In KDE, Plasma 5.12 has been released, and it is great! It has been released in time to make it into Kubuntu Bionic, our next big release which will become an LTS. Plasma 5.12 is a great fit there, since it is also an LTS. After living through the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerability early-exposure, it feels great to finally be back on track. We have it available right now in Artful (17.10) as well: https://kubuntu.org/news/plasma-5-12-arrives-in-backport-ppa-for-kubuntu-17-10-artful-aardvark/. I'm using it now.

  • KDE Applications 18.04 Schedule finalized
  • print-manager 0.4.0

    This last month I decided to do some work on print-manager, it’s code dates back to 2010, so it’s 8 years old now, my last commits where on 2014, after that Jan Grulich did the KF5/Qt5 port and last year I tried to do some improvements but only managed to do a single commit.

  • App popularity in Discover

    Currently, Discover sorts apps by popularity. In this case, popularity means “number of ratings”, and ratings come from user reviews. This is why GNOME Tweak Tool shows up first in Discover’s browse list: apparently it’s very popular among GNOME users, and they’ve written lots of reviews about it. We should all follow their lead and write some quality reviews about our favorite software; this helps the best apps bubble up to the top, and users love reading reviews from other users when determining whether or not to install an app.

  • SoK 2018 wrap-up report

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TuxMachines: Software: Audacity, Cryptomator, VLC, Corydalis, RcppEigen, Cockpit, Flowblade

Friday 9th of February 2018 08:09:41 AM
  • Audacity – An Ideal App for Multi-Track Recording & Editing

    Great history is always made whenever the greats rub minds together. In some cases, it is a groundbreaking finding in chemistry or biology. In some others, it is the solution to problems that impeded our technological advancements using computers.

    In this case, it is the release of a free open-source digital audio and recording computer software application for Windows, GNU/Linux, and OS X – Audacity. It was built by Roger Dannenberg and Dominic Mazzoni at Carnie Mellon university, around fall, in the years 1999-2000.

  • Cryptomator - Encrypt your Cloud Data Files on Linux

    Figuring out a good path to security for your cloud data can be quite a challenge. Normally, the cloud is a very safe place for data, despite Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD) from those who might want to access their data everywhere anytime. But the security is a very problem so we need to use some tools or methods in other to prevent the risks. This is why you can use some tools like cryptomator to encrypt your data files.

  • VLC 3.0 Should Be Out By The End Of The Week

    The long sought after VLC 3.0 multimedia player release will be here anytime now.

    VLC 3.0.0 was already tagged in Git and the final preparations are underway in putting out this major update to the open-source, cross-platform media player.

    The VLC project expects to officially announce v3.0 by the end of the week, but considering how long this release cycle has been drawn out, it wouldn't surprise me if it becomes a few extra days.

  • Releasing Corydalis

    So, without further ado, … wait, I already said everything! Corydalis v0.2.0 (a rather arbitrarily chosen version number) is up on GitHub.

  • RcppEigen 0.3.3.4.0

    A new minor release 0.3.3.4.0 of RcppEigen hit CRAN earlier today, and just went to Debian as well. It brings Eigen 3.3.4 to R.

  • Cockpit 161

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 161.

  • Screencasts on Linux, part 2

    Well, no more, it seems. I seem to have missed a beautiful, functional, easy to use, and relatively fast one, called Flowblade.

    I had never heard of it, and I haven’t seen it mentioned on any of the sites I looked for video editing software reviews on. I only ran into it while browsing the available Flatpaks on Flathub. However, it has been in development for a couple of years, and it’s development seems active, though a bit dependent on a single coder.

    Having said that, I tip my hat to that single coder, who goes by the name of jliljebl, because this software is A-MA-ZING!

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Reddit: Why are thinkpads so popular in the linux community ?

Friday 9th of February 2018 08:01:55 AM

I am considering buying a thinkpad. Why should i choose that instead of another laptop ?

submitted by /u/terramorpha
[link] [comments]

TuxMachines: Purism's Updates on Librem and Librem 5

Friday 9th of February 2018 06:16:48 AM
  • Qubes 4.0 fully working on Librem laptops, coreboot added IOMMU and TPM

    It’s easy to take things for granted when your computer runs a non-free proprietary BIOS. While the BIOS that comes with your computer is usually configured to match its features that’s not always the case. You end up with a sort of binary arrangement: if your BIOS supports a feature or allows you to change a setting, great, but if it doesn’t, you are generally out of luck. One example is with some of the new UEFI computers that ship with stripped-down BIOS options. One example we ran across recently had legacy boot disabled, secure boot enabled, and no way to change either setting, which is a terrible restriction for users wanting a free software distribution like PureOS or any another distribution that avoids the misnamed “secure boot” UEFI option.

  • Designing the Mobile Experience with Convergence in Mind

    It is always great to have the opportunity to discuss face to face with community members to get the pulse of what their thoughts are and suggestions they might have for the Librem 5 project. As such, I was happy to spend time discussing at length with people attending FOSDEM this week-end. Comments from the many supporters made me realize that there are some points regarding goals and vision, in terms of design for the entire Librem line, that needed to be expanded upon and clarified. Keep in mind that although the vision for our short and long-term design goals for the Librem 5 is becoming increasingly clearer, it is of course still “work in progress” from a design perspective; things are not set in stone and therefore we are listening (and responding) to the community’s feedback.

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TuxMachines: today's howtos

Friday 9th of February 2018 06:15:03 AM

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LXer: 3 steps to reduce a project's failure rate

Friday 9th of February 2018 05:52:41 AM
It's no secret that clear, concise, and measurable requirements lead to more successful projects. A study about large scale projects by McKinsey & Company in conjunction with the University of Oxford revealed that "on average, large IT projects run 45 percent over budget and 7 percent over time, while delivering 56 percent less value than predicted." The research also showed that some of the causes for this failure were "fuzzy business objectives, out-of-sync stakeholders, and excessive rework."read more

TuxMachines: New Chrome Beta

Friday 9th of February 2018 05:17:16 AM
  • Chrome 65 Beta: CSS Paint API and the ServerTiming API

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, Mac, and Windows.

  • Chrome 65 Now In Beta With The CSS Paint API

    Google released the latest beta of the Chrome/Chromium web-browser today. Chrome 65 Beta isn't as exciting as some past browser updates, but there are still some new additions to note.

  • Chrome Adding Shorter Shortcut For Bookmarks: Windows and Linux Only.

    Improvements to accessibility are always welcome additions to any software and web browsers are no exception. Clearly, we are fans of Chrome and that includes Google’s browser in all its forms across every available platform. So, we celebrate with all the non-Chrome OS users when developers bring refinements to the world’s most popular window to the web.

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TuxMachines: PostgreSQL 10.2 Officially Out

Friday 9th of February 2018 05:05:11 AM
  • Release 10.2

    Release date: 2018-02-08

  • PostgreSQL 10.2 Released With A Ton Of Security & Bug Fixes

    PostgreSQL 10.2 is now available as the latest point release to PostgreSQL 10.

    While PostgreSQL 10.0 brought a ton of new features and improvements when released last October, these point releases are focused on just improving the stability and fixes for this popular database system.

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TuxMachines: Mainframes and Containers

Friday 9th of February 2018 04:52:19 AM
  • Why Mainframes Aren't Going Away Any Time Soon

    IBM's former systems and technology CTO explains when it makes sense to buy a mainframe and what the advantages are.

  • Starling Bank cashes in on open source Kubernetes for flexibility and agility

    UK fintech Starling Bank is building on the evolution of its architecture with plans to move to a cross-cloud approach supported by open source container orchestration platform Kubernetes.

  • Kubernetes for dev infrastructure

    I was initially assigned to solve an easy-sounding problem: make integration tests faster. There were a few hundreds of Selenium-based workflows, which were running sequentially and taking up to 10 hours to complete. The obvious solution was to parallelize them. The problem was that they were not designed to run concurrently and hence we had to either refactor all tests or provide an isolated copy of the ThoughtSpot system (a test backend) for every thread to run on. Redesigning tests might look like a cleaner solution, but it would require a tremendous effort from the whole engineering team and a lot of test-related changes in the product, so it was not feasible. We’ve decided to take the second approach, and that left me with the task, I’ve ended up solving with the help of Docker and Kubernetes: make it possible to quickly (in 2–3 minutes) spin up dozens of test backends with pre-loaded test data, run tests, tear them down, repeat.

  • Kubernetes vs Docker Swarm: A comparison of cloud container tools

    Containers are rising like a hot air balloon in the cloud market. These days, the CIO can hardly move for suggestions of one-shot-wonder tools to lighten the burden of IT infrastructure management. But when it comes to the battle of Kubernetes vs Docker, which programme comes out on top?

    Touted as silver bullet simplifiers of software update administration, both tools are great for transporting applications from one system to another without risking compatibility problems, missing files or unexpected errors. In the first instance, using a container to transport applications is much faster and better value than using a virtual machine, so either product is a good place to start for boosting cloud architecture efficiency.

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TuxMachines: What Is Kali Linux, and Do You Need It?

Friday 9th of February 2018 04:42:50 AM

If you’ve heard a 13-year-old would-be hacker talking about how 1337 they are, chances are, Kali Linux came up. Despite it’s script kiddie reputation, Kali is actually a real tool (or set of tools) for security professionals.

Kali is a Linux distribution based on Debian. Its goal is simple; include as many penetration and security audit tools as possible in one convenient package. Kali delivers, too. Many of the best open-source tools for conducting security tests are collected and ready to use.

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LXer: 3 Ways to Extend the Power of Kubernetes

Friday 9th of February 2018 04:38:21 AM
to build the controllers, you need resources, that is, you need to extend Kubernetes. There are three ways to do that and, from the most flexible (but also more difficult) to the easiest they are...

TuxMachines: Freespire 3.0.6.5 released

Friday 9th of February 2018 04:32:28 AM

Today we are releasing Freespire 3.0.6.5 which is a bug fix and incremental release of the Freespire 3.0 series. We also added some features and applications that users wanted us to include in the distribution. With this release we fixed several issues.

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TuxMachines: 11 Excellent Free Scorewriters – Compose, arrange, print, and publish music

Friday 9th of February 2018 04:26:04 AM

A scorewriter (often known as notation software or music notation processor) is software used with a computer for creating, editing and printing sheet music.

For a musician to be able to read, understand, and play music, a composition needs to be in written form. A system of notation is essential for musicians to be able to play music as intended by the composer.

In the field of music composition, Sibelius and Finale are held in high esteem. These scorewriters are widely used by composers, songwriters, and arrangers for creating sheet music, including the score for an ensemble and parts for individual musicians. Unfortunately, both Sibelius and Finale are proprietary software. They are very expensive applications; the cheapest perpetual license for Sibelius sets you back a princely £500. And neither application is available for Linux.

Fortunately, there is a wide range of open source scorewriters which are supported in Linux. This article recommends cost-effective alternatives to Sibelius and Finale. The software featured here is released under freely distributable licenses, all are available to download at no charge, and generate music scores which are engraved with traditional layout rules.

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TuxMachines: Automation controller debuts Linux-based PLCnext software

Friday 9th of February 2018 03:56:23 AM

Phoenix Contact’s rugged, dual Cortex-A9 based “PLCnext AXC F 2152” controller for its Axioline F I/O field bus is the first field controller designed to run Phoenix’s Linux-based PLCnext control stack, which enables PLC control using high-level languages.

Today’s embedded engineers have a wider breadth of tech knowledge than their parents’ generation, but they are less likely to know the intricacies of the old-school Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) and field bus technologies that still drive much of the industrial automation world. As reported in Design & Control, Phoenix Contacts decided to reach out to younger engineers by providing a Real-Time Linux-based PLCnext Technology field controller stack, which supports multiple high-end programming languages in addition to traditional IEC 61131 PLC programming. A year after announcing PLCnext, Phoenix has launched the first controller based on the technology.

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More in Tux Machines

Why open source could be IBM's key to future success in the cloud

Do those same developers need IBM? Developers certainly benefit from IBM's investments in open source, but it's not as clear that those same developers have much to gain from IBM's cloud. Google, for example, has done a stellar job open sourcing code like TensorFlow and Kubernetes that feeds naturally into running related workloads on Google Cloud Platform. Aside from touting its Java bonafides, however, IBM has yet to demonstrate that developers get significant benefits for modern workloads on its cloud. That's IBM's big challenge: Translating its open source expertise into real, differentiated value for developers on its cloud. Read more

Top 8 Debian-Based Distros

Most people tend to forget that despite Ubuntu's success over the years, it's still just a distro based on another distro - Debian. Debian on its own, however, isn't really well suited for newer users...hence the explosion of distros based on Debian over the recent years. There are lot of great choices for Linux users. Which one is best for you? Read more

Compact, rugged IoT gateway offers dual GbE with PoE

Inforce has launched a $250 “Inforce 6320” IoT gateway that runs Linux on a quad -A53 Snapdragon 410, and offers WiFi, BT, GPS, HDMI, USB, -30 to 85°C support, and dual GbE ports with PoE. Inforce Computing’s $250 Inforce 6320 is a compact (170 x 95 x 42mm) IoT gateway that runs Ubuntu Core (Snappy) and Debian on Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 410E. Inforce promises “periodic upstream kernel based BSP releases [that] include in-depth documentation along with a host of royalty-free software.” The Debian BSP includes LXDE, drivers for all available interfaces, as and access to the Inforce TechWeb tech support services. Read more

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