Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linuxinsight

Syndicate content
LinuxInsight - aggregated feeds
Updated: 1 hour 17 min ago

TuxMachines: today's howtos

Sunday 22nd of March 2015 01:47:32 PM

read more

Phoronix: A Look At BCache vs. LVM Cache For HDD+SSD Linux Systems

Sunday 22nd of March 2015 01:45:29 PM
For those thinking about potentially running a Linux system with a combination of SSD and HDD so that the solid-state drive would be able to act as a performance cache for commonly used data, BCache and LVM-cache/dmcache are two of the commonly used solutions...

Phoronix: AMD Is Hiring Two More Open-Source Linux GPU Driver Developers

Sunday 22nd of March 2015 01:28:04 PM
AMD issued two job postings this past week for hiring more open-source Linux graphics driver developers...

TuxMachines: Netscape: the web browser that came back to haunt Microsoft

Sunday 22nd of March 2015 01:16:51 PM

But even when Microsoft engineers built a TCP/IP stack into Windows, the pain continued. Andreessen and his colleagues left university to found Netscape, wrote a new browser from scratch and released it as Netscape Navigator. This spread like wildfire and led Netscape’s founders to speculate (hubristically) that the browser would eventually become the only piece of software that computer users really needed – thereby relegating the operating system to a mere life-support system for the browser.

Now that got Microsoft’s attention. It was an operating-system company, after all. On May 26, 1995 Gates wrote an internal memo (entitled “The Internet Tidal Wave”) which ordered his subordinates to throw all the company’s resources into launching a single-minded attack on the web browser market. Given that Netscape had a 90% share of that market, Gates was effectively declaring war on Netscape. Microsoft hastily built its own browser, named it Internet Explorer (IE), and set out to destroy the upstart by incorporating Explorer into the Windows operating system, so that it was the default browser for every PC sold.

The strategy worked: Microsoft succeeded in exterminating Netscape, but in the process also nearly destroyed itself, because the campaign triggered an antitrust (unfair competition) suit which looked like breaking up the company, only to founder at the last moment. So Microsoft lived to tell the tale, and Internet Explorer became the world’s browser. By 2000, IE had a 95% market share; it was the de facto industry standard, which meant that if you wanted to make a living from software development you had to make sure that your stuff worked in IE. The Explorer franchise was a monopoly on steroids.

read more

More in Tux Machines

EXT4 In Linux 4.1 Adds File-System Level Encryption

The EXT4 file-system updates for the Linux 4.1 kernel have been sent in and it features the file-system-level encryption support. Earlier this month we wrote about the newly-published patches for EXT4 encryption support coming out of Google and intended to land in the next major release of Android. Those patches for file-system-level encryption will now be landing upstream with the Linux 4.1 kernel update. Besides this native encryption support for EXT4, the rest of the updates for this merge window pull request equate to mainly fixes. More details via the pull request itself. Read more

Manjaro Linux 0.8.13 Pre1 Released for Testing with KDE Plasma 5.2.2 and Xfce 4.12

The Manjaro development team announced that the first Preview release of the upcoming Manjaro Linux 0.8.13 operating system is now available for download in Xfce and KDE Live CD flavors. Read more

Ardour 4.0 released

The Ardour project is pleased to announce the release of Ardour 4.0. This release brings many technical improvements, as well as new features and over a thousand bug fixes. The biggest changes in this release: Better cross platform support. Ardour now runs on GNU/Linux, OS X and for the first time, Windows. JACK is no longer required, making it easier than ever for new users to get Ardour up and running (though JACK is still usable with Ardour). The user interface has seen a thorough overhaul, leading to a more modern and polished experience. Read more

Android Leftovers