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Updated: 19 hours 48 min ago

TuxMachines: Servers/Networks

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 04:24:40 AM
  • Cloud Migration Is Making Performance Monitoring Crucial

    Application performance monitoring (APM) and network performance monitoring (NPM) are becoming increasingly important as businesses that have adopt cloud-based services and virtualized infrastructure.

    In the recent SDxCentral report, “Network Performance Management Takes On Applications,” more than half of surveyed respondents are actively looking at APM and NPM systems, and more than one-third are in the testing and deployment phases of adoption. Another 16 to 20 percent are piloting these systems, and roughly 15 percent have already deployed them in their network.

  • Containing container chaos with Kubernetes

    You've made the switch to Linux containers. Now you're trying to figure out how to run containers in production, and you're facing a few issues that were not present during development. You need something more than a few well-prepared Dockerfiles to move to production. What you need is something to manage all of your containers: a container orchestration system.

  • Featured speakers announced for OpenStack Summit in Barcelona as adoption continues growth in Europe
  • Navigating OpenStack: Community, Release Cycles and Events

    Hopefully last week we piqued your interest in a career path in OpenStack. Adoption is growing and so is the number of OpenStack jobs. Like any other open source project, if you’re going to use it---professionally or personally—it’s important to understand its community and design/release patterns.

  • OpenDaylight Introduces 'Boron' SDN Platform Release

    The industry consortium's fifth release of its SDN platform puts a focus on the cloud, NFV, performance and tools.
    The OpenDaylight Project effort to create a common platform for network virtualization continues to mature with the unveiling of the group's fifth release, dubbed "Boron."

    The industry consortium announced the Boron release Sept. 21, a week before the OpenDaylight Summit kicks off in Seattle Sept. 27. Project officials said the new release brings with it improvements around the cloud and network-functions virtualization (NFV), and is the result of contributions by consortium members in a range of areas, including performance and tools.

  • Is an Editable Blockchain the Future of Finance?

    Blockchain, the technology that underlies the cryptocurrency Bitcoin, has been celebrated as a way to change the way transactions of all kinds are made. But a suggestion to make an editable version of the technology is now dividing opinion.

    The consultancy firm Accenture is patenting a system that would allow an administrator to make changes to information stored in a blockchain. In an interview with the Financial Times (paywall), Accenture’s global head of financial services, Richard Lumb, said that the development was about “adapting the blockchain to the corporate world” in order to “make it pragmatic and useful for the financial services sector.”

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LXer: Open source projects for the Internet of Things, from A to Z

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 03:57:16 AM
This guide to 21 open source projects for IoT ranges from standards organizations to open source frameworks and dev tools. ? ? An Open Source Perspective on the Internet of Things Part 2: 21 Open Source Projects for IoT ? The Internet of Things market is fragmented, amorphous, and continually changing, and its very nature […]

TuxMachines: Open source software free (but not the free you’re thinking of)

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 03:38:18 AM

I like practical application. Recently, I’ve been trying to expand my horizons through studying Linux operating systems. I’ll use this opportunity to reinforce some of what I’ve learned and hopefully shed a little light on exactly what open source software is and how it’s used. For the sake of clarity, there is a lot more to the topic than discussed below, but we can only stuff so much info into the column!

A common misconception is that open source software means free (as in beer). Open source software may be free to use or paid for, but the “free” in open source applies to the rights (as in speech) of the general public to use, distribute or modify the source software at will. Digging further, there are degrees of “openness” of open source software. As the term indicates, the source is open but generally the source is just the base element of the overall application. For instance, operating systems are typically comprised of a kernel and many other programs which work together, resulting in products like Microsoft Windows, macOS or Red Hat.

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Reddit: Sms Spoofing Kali Linux

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 03:21:40 AM

TuxMachines: Fedora News (Flatpak 0.6.11, Rust, RISC-V)

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 02:57:17 AM
  • Flatpak 0.6.11 Linux Universal Binary Format Released with New Features, Fixes

    Alex Larsson from the Flatpak project, the universal binary format that aims to simplify application distribution across multiple GNU/Linux operating systems, announced the release of Flatpak 0.6.11.

    Flatpak 0.6.11 is a small maintenance version that comes approximately one week after the release of the previous one, Flatpak 0.6.10, bringing a new FLATPAK_CHECK_VERSION macro in the libflatpak library to automatically check the installed Flatpak version, a new option to the flatpak-builder command, namely "--show-deps," to allow listing of all the files on which the manifest depends.

    The list of changes continues with support for using dashes in application IDs, but app developers are being informed by Alex Larsson that to make them work with symbolic icon names, the IDs may not end with the "-symbolic" name attached. Also, it looks like PTYs are now correctly handled by the HostCommand component, which now outputs the correct PID instead of a bogus one.

  • Rust meets Fedora

    Rust is a system programming language which runs blazingly fast, and prevents almost all crashes, segfaults, and data races. You might wonder exactly why yet another programming language is useful, since there are already so many of them. This article aims to explain why.

  • Fedora / RISC-V stage4 autobuilder is up and running

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TuxMachines: GNOME News

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 02:54:49 AM
  • GNOME 3.22 core apps

    GNOME 3.22 is scheduled to be released today. Along with this release come brand new recommendations for distributions on which applications should be installed by default, and which applications should not. I’ve been steadily working on these since joining the release team earlier this year, and I’m quite pleased with the result.

  • Catanzaro: GNOME 3.22 core apps
  • GNOME 3.22 Released: the Future is Now
  • GNOME 3.22 released
  • GNOME 3.22 released
  • GNOME 3.22 Officially Released

    Matthias Clasen announced the official GNOME 3.22.0 release a short time ago. He wrote in part, "This release brings comprehensive Flatpak support. GNOME Software can install and update Flatpaks, GNOME Builder can create them, and the desktop provides portal implementations to enable sandboxed applications. Improvements to core GNOME applications include support for batch renaming in Files, sharing support in GNOME Photos, an updated look for GNOME Software, a redesigned keyboard settings panel, and many more."

  • Parsix' Nice GNOME, OpenMandriva 3 Sluggish, Firefox 49
  • GTK+ 3.22 GUI Toolkit Released for GNOME 3.22 as Devs Prepare for GTK+ 4.0

    Immediately after announcing the final release of the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment, Matthias Clasen also had the pleasure of informing us about the availability of the GTK+ 3.22 GUI toolkit.

    Most of you out there developing GTK+ apps know what this open source software is all about, and the latest stable build is now 3.22, released as part of the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment. However, it looks like this will be the last release in the GTK+ 3 series, as the developers are now preparing to bump the development builds to version 3.90.x towards GTK+ 4.0.

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Reddit: Linux in tractors

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 02:50:27 AM

Just took apart a trimble fm-1000 from my dad's tractor(wasn't working and out of warranty) looked at the cf card... thing runs some type of linux. I just thought it was cool...

submitted by /u/remotefixonline
[link] [comments]

Reddit: What linux related podcasts do you guys listen to?

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 02:35:01 AM

I need some podcasts to listen to for keeping up with the linux news, and tbh im bored and want some shit to listen to.

submitted by /u/Lukexj
[link] [comments]

Reddit: Trouble with VSFTPD

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 02:34:01 AM

Alright, guys. I need some help. I can't quite figure it out. I am trying to setup a Plex server on my Ubuntu server. I have SSH working and FTP "working". I am needing to create FTP access for user "plex" to ONLY have access to /media/plex. Inside that directory is a mounted external hard drive containing all my files for Plex. How can I achieve having that user to ONLY have access to that file? Nothing more, nothing less.

submitted by /u/Tpayne174
[link] [comments]

TuxMachines: Wayland Rising

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 02:30:49 AM
  • How Google's Android Runtime On Chrome OS Uses Wayland, DRM

    Google developer David Reveman presented at this morning's XDC2016 conference in Finland about the Android Runtime for Chrome making use of Wayland (ARC++) and how the rest of its graphics stack looks for running Android programs on Chrome OS.

    For rendering with ARC++, Gralloc and the OpenGL ES driver are using the Direct Rendering Manager, applications have full access to OpenGL ES, and there are support for other rendering APIs. Compositing with ARC++ is handled by the Android HWComposer and then surfaces are forwarded to Chrome for compositing with the rest of Chrome OS' user-interface.

  • Wayland 1.12 Next-Gen Linux Display Server Officially Released with Many Goodies

    Today, September 21, 2016, Bryce Harrington has had the great pleasure of announcing the immediate availability of the Wayland 1.12.0 display server for GNU/Linux operating systems, along with the Weston 1.12.0 compositor.

    Development for Wayland 1.12 and Weston 1.12 started exactly a month ago when the first Alpha build was seeded to public testers, and it already contained many of the new functionalities and improvements implemented in this final build we can install today on our GNU/Linux distributions.

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TuxMachines: Ubuntu Leftovers (Snapcraft GUI 3.0, Ubuntu 16.10, and IBM)

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 02:25:44 AM
  • Snapcraft GUI 3.0 Released for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Ubuntu 16.10

    Softpedia was informed today, September 21, 2016, by Snapcraft GUI developer Keshav Bhatt about the release of a new major update, version 3.0, for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and above.

    Last week, we introduced you guys to the Snapcraft GUI application, whose main goal is to help application developers who want to distribute their projects across multiple GNU/Linux distributions using Canonical's innovative Snap universal binary package format build Snappy packages more easily.

  • Ubuntu to Run Much Faster in Virtual Machines, as Well as When Using It Remotely

    After releasing the OTA-13 update for Ubuntu Phone and Ubuntu Tablet devices, Canonical is now working hard on putting all the pieces together for next month's Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) operating system.

    Ubuntu 16.10 will be officially released on October 13, 2016, but until then we will be able to get an early taste of its new features by downloading the Final Beta ISO images, which for some of the opt-in flavors is called Beta 2. However, for Ubuntu itself, this will be the first and only Beta release.

  • Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Final Beta Freeze Now in Effect, Lands September 22

    Today, September 21, 2016, Canonical's Adam Conrad announced that the soon-to-be-released Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Final Beta is now in freeze stage and will arrive, as initially planned, on September 22, 2016.

    However, early adopters should look for the release late Thursday or very early on Friday, September 23, because the Ubuntu developers are a little busy right now pushing last minute updates to the stable archive, and they also managed to land the new Linux 4.8 kernel packages earlier today, as reported right here on Softpedia.

  • Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Is Now Officially Powered by Linux Kernel 4.8

    Ubuntu 16.10 being in development and all that, it usually gets at least a few updated packages every 24 hours, and today, September 21, 2016, we were surprised to see that the Linux 4.8 kernel packages have finally landed.

  • IBM Forges More OpenStack Ties with Canonical and Red Hat

    IBM has a slew of news announcements this week. Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, is spreading out with its OpenStack eforts. It has announced that Ubuntu OpenStack is now available for IBM customers who want to manage their own OpenStack cloud across IBM platforms such as IBM z Systems, IBM LinuxONE and IBM Power Systems, including IBM’s newly announced OpenPOWER LC servers. This is an expansion of the companies’ hybrid cloud partnership, and many instances of OpenStack already run on top of Ubuntu. We covered the news in depth here.

    Meanwhile, the company launched many new products that consist of a combination of Power, z Systems, and storage, with cloud-ready functionality already bundled.

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TuxMachines: Phoronix Graphics News

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 02:23:20 AM

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TuxMachines: Hands-on with the quad-core ARM9 Roseapple Pi hacker SBC

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 02:05:48 AM

I use Raspberry Pi boards for several real-world jobs. My “STEAMpunk Conference Personality Identification Device” (aka: conference badge) uses a Pi to show an mp4 promotional video on its tiny 1.8-inch color TFT display while “orbing” its blue LED “ozone tube”, for added attention grabbing. Oh, it also includes my stage name “DR TORQ”, in big, bold antique-looking letters.

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TuxMachines: Apt 1.3 Released

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 01:59:54 AM

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Reddit: MATE 1.16 released

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 01:57:06 AM

TuxMachines: Games for GNU/Linux

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 01:56:26 AM

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TuxMachines: MATE 1.16 Desktop Environment Officially Released with More GTK+ 3 Improvements

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 01:49:26 AM

Just a few minutes ago, Ubuntu MATE project leader, and now a Canonical employee, Martin Wimpress, informed us about the availability of the MATE 1.16 desktop environment for GNU/Linux operating systems.

It has been six long months since the MATE 1.14 desktop environment was announced, during which the MATE development team worked hard on bringing lots of improvements to the core applications included in the lightweight graphical desktop interface used by default in the Ubuntu MATE operating system and other GNU/Linux distributions, as well as lots of other enhancements and cosmetic changes.

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LXer: Surprise! Microsoft Isn’t Blocking Linux on Lenovo Laptops

Thursday 22nd of September 2016 12:31:25 AM
It was easy to place the blame on Microsoft in a knee-jerk reaction — and it didn’t help that a Lenovo representative placed blame firmly in Redmond’s lap. It appears, however, that Microsoft’s not involved, and Lenovo’s not to blame either.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Graphics

  • The RADV Radeon Vulkan Linux Driver Continues Picking Up Features
  • OpenChrome Maintainer Making Some Progress On VIA DRM Driver
    Independent developer Kevin Brace took over maintaining the OpenChrome DDX driver earlier this year to improve the open-source VIA Linux graphics support while over the summer he's slowly been getting up to speed on development of the OpenChrome DRM driver. The OpenChrome DRM driver was making progress while James Simmons was developing it a few years back, but since he left the project, it's been left to bit rot. It will take a lot of work even to get this previously "good" code back to working on the latest Linux 4.x mainline kernels given how DRM core interfaces have evolved in recent times.
  • My talk about Mainline Explicit Fencing at XDC 2016!
    Last week I was at XDC in Helsinki where I presented about the Explicit Fencing work we’ve been doing on the Mainline Linux Kernel in the lastest few months. There was a livestream of all presentations during the conference and recorded sections are available. You can check the video of my presentation. Check out the slides too.

Linux Kernel News

  • Linux 4.8 gets rc8
    Chill, penguin-fanciers: Linux lord Linus Torvalds is sitting on the egg that is Linux 4.8 for another week. As Torvalds indicated last week, this version of the kernel still needs work and therefore earned itself an eighth release candidate.
  • Linux 4.8-rc8 Released: Linux 4.8 Next Weekend
  • Linux Kernel 4.7.5 Released with Numerous ARM and Networking Improvements
    The fifth maintenance update to the Linux 4.7 kernel series, which is currently the most advanced, secure and stable kernel branch you can get for your GNU/Linux operating system, has been announced by Greg Kroah-Hartman. Linux kernel 4.7.5 is here only ten days after the release of the previous maintenance version, namely Linux kernel 4.7.4, and it's a big update that changes a total of 213 files, with 1774 insertions and 971 deletions, which tells us that the kernel developers and hackers had a pretty busy week patching all sorts of bugs and security issues, as well as to add various, much-needed improvements.
  • Blockchain Summit Day Two: End-Of-Conference Highlights From Shanghai
    Financial services firms and startups looking to be the bridge to blockchain ledgers continued to dominate presentations on the second and final day of the Blockchain Summit, ending International Blockchain Week in Shanghai that also saw Devcon2 and a startup demo competition.
  • Testing Various HDDs & SSDs On Ubuntu With The Linux 4.8 Kernel
    Here are some fresh benchmarks of various solid-state drives (SATA 3.0 SSDs plus two NVMe M.2 SSDs) as well as two HDDs for getting a fresh look at how they are performing using the Linux 4.8 Git kernel. After publishing Friday's Intel 600P Series NVME SSD tests of this lower-cost NVM Express storage line-up, I continued testing a few other SSDs and HDDs. These additional reference points are available for your viewing pleasure today. The additional data is also going to be used for reference in a Linux 4.8-based BCache SSD+HDD comparison being published next week. Stay tuned for those fresh BCache numbers.

Behind the GNOME 3.22 Release Video

This is less than usual. The time saving mostly stems from spending less time recording for the release video. At first thought you might think recording would be a breeze but it can be one of the most frustrating aspects of making the videos. Each cycle the GNOME community lands improvement a wide set of GNOME’s applications. So before each release I have to find some way to run a dozen of applications from master. I do this either by: Read more

Games for GNU/Linux