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LXer: KDE Plasma 5.11, Humble Bundle Acquisition, elementary OS & Snappy | This Week in Linux Ep.9

Monday 16th of October 2017 06:10:36 AM
Round up of This Week's Linux GNews including KDE Plasma 5.11, Humble Bundle Acquisition, elementary OS & Snappy, Solus Steam Integration Snap, Helicopter Combat, and more(Editor's note: Video report)

TuxMachines: Software: psdash, Tilix, Oceanaudio

Monday 16th of October 2017 05:56:55 AM
  • psdash – System And Process Monitoring Web Dashboard For Linux

    psdash is a system monitoring and information web dashboard for Linux written in python using psutils and flask. The GUI is pretty much straight forward and clean. All the data is updated automatically, no need to refresh.

    psutils (process and system utilities) is a cross-platform library for retrieving information on running processes and system utilization (CPU, memory, disks, network, sensors) in Python.

  • Tiling Terminal Emulator Tilix 1.7.0 Released with Minor Improvements

    Tilix, the modern tiling terminal emulator for Linux desktops, scored an update at the weekend.

    Although a modest release, Tilix 1.7.0 brings some timely bug fixes and feature improvements to the app formerly known as Terminix.

    This includes support for using tabs instead of a sidebar, a feature Tilix dev Gerald Nunn says was a frequent user request.

    There’s also preliminary Flatpak support, though there’s no specific information on how to text or make use of the Tilix Flatpak. It’d be great to see the app added to the (awesome) Flathub Flatpak app store.

  • Oceanaudio An Audio Editor For Linux

    Audios are an integral part of life. Playing our best songs, having a party or a special function, we require audio everywhere. That is why audio editors are there too to help us make the best of an audio file. When I say audio editor, many of you will just think of audacity. Sure that is a pretty cool software but I think it’s a bit complicated for the inexperienced one.

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Reddit: Tiling window manager + good mouse support up to Plan 9's Acme editor?

Monday 16th of October 2017 04:59:57 AM

I'm looking for either actively developed or relatively bug free window managers that either behave like Acme, or can be made to behave like Acme without significant modification of window manager itself.

This is Acme: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dP1xVpMPn8M

submitted by /u/atonal174
[link] [comments]

Slashdot: Munich Plans New Vote on Dumping Linux For Windows 10

Monday 16th of October 2017 04:41:22 AM

Reddit: This Week in Solus - Install #47 | Solus

Monday 16th of October 2017 04:13:43 AM

TuxMachines: Linux 4.14-rc5 Released

Monday 16th of October 2017 04:05:58 AM

Linus Torvalds has just issued the Linux 4.14-rc5 kernel update.

With this release out today, we're three to four weeks out from seeing the official Linux 4.14 kernel release. Linux 4.14 has overall been a big cycle with the possibility of going up to a Linux 4.14-rc8 test release prior to declaring the stable release, but we'll have to see Torvalds' reactions in the weeks ahead.

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Reddit: Broadcom Wireless on linux

Monday 16th of October 2017 04:03:21 AM

It seems like linux is still behind with broadcom wireless. Are there any distros where it works easily or on install. I can't get it working on arch.

submitted by /u/LinuxCam
[link] [comments]

TuxMachines: Security: MalwareTech, JavaScript, Vista 10, TPM2, Intel Back Door, Linux Bug, Pizza Hut Breach, Telcos Spying

Monday 16th of October 2017 03:56:44 AM
  • Let MalwareTech Surf! Status Report
  • 500 million PCs are being used for stealth cryptocurrency mining online

    A month or so ago, torrent search website The Pirate Bay raised concern among the community as visitors noticed their CPU usage surged whenever a page was opened.

  • Dutch slam Windows 10 for breaking privacy laws

    Dutch authorities claim Microsoft’s Windows 10 operating system is violating data protection and privacy laws, and warned they may impose fines on the US technology giant.

    “Microsoft breaches the Dutch data protection law by processing personal data of people that use the Windows 10 operating system on their computers,” the Dutch Data Protection Authority (DPA) said in a statement late Friday.

    The company fails to “clearly inform” users of Windows 10 that it “continuously collects personal data about the usage of apps and web surfing behavior through its web browser Edge, when the default settings are used,” the DPA said.

  • Using Elliptic Curve Cryptography with TPM2

    One of the most significant advances going from TPM1.2 to TPM2 was the addition of algorithm agility: The ability of TPM2 to work with arbitrary symmetric and asymmetric encryption schemes. In practice, in spite of this much vaunted agile encryption capability, most actual TPM2 chips I’ve seen only support a small number of asymmetric encryption schemes, usually RSA2048 and a couple of Elliptic Curves. However, the ability to support any Elliptic Curve at all is a step up from TPM1.2. This blog post will detail how elliptic curve schemes can be integrated into existing cryptographic systems using TPM2. However, before we start on the practice, we need at least a tiny swing through the theory of Elliptic Curves.

  • Sakaki's EFI Install Guide/Disabling the Intel Management Engine

    The Intel Management Engine ('IME' or 'ME') is an out-of-band co-processor integrated in all post-2006 Intel-CPU-based PCs. It has full network and memory access and runs proprietary, signed, closed-source software at ring -3,[1][2][3][4] independently of the BIOS, main CPU and platform operating system[5][6] — a fact which many regard as an unacceptable security risk (particularly given that at least one remotely exploitable security hole has already been reported[7][8]).

  • Linux vulnerable to privilege escalation

    An advisory from Cisco issued last Friday, October 13th, gave us the heads-up on a local privilege escalation vulnerability in the Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA).

    The bug is designated CVE-2017-15265, but its Mitre entry was still marked “reserved” at the time of writing. Cisco, however, had this to say about it before release:

  • Pizza Hut was hacked, company says

    According to a customer notice emailed from the pizza chain, those who placed an order on its website or mobile app between the morning of Oct. 1 and midday Oct. 2 might have had their information exposed.

    The “temporary security intrusion” lasted for about 28 hours, the notice said, and it’s believed that names, billing ZIP codes, delivery addresses, email addresses and payment card information — meaning account number, expiration date and CVV number — were compromised.

  • Want to see something crazy? Open this link on your phone with WiFi turned off

    These services are using your mobile phone’s IP address to look up your phone number, your billing information and possibly your phone’s current location as provided by cell phone towers (no GPS or phone location services required). These services are doing this with the assistance of the telco providers.

  • Telcos "selling realtime ability to associate web browsing with name & address"

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TuxMachines: Star 1.0.1 - lightweight desktops on a Devuan base

Monday 16th of October 2017 03:51:43 AM

On the whole, I like the ideas presented in Star's design. The distribution is basically Devuan and pulls packages from Devuan's software repositories, but the live media and lightweight environments are great for testing the distribution and for breathing life into older computers. While this approach of starting light and adding only what we need is a solid concept, and proved to be very forgiving on resources, there are some rough edges in the implementation. The missing manual pages, for example, and the media player issues I ran into posed problems.

A few programs I used flashed warning messages letting me know PulseAudio was not available as Star uses the ALSA sound system by default. Strictly speaking, PulseAudio is not required most of the time and, if we do run into a situation where it is needed, we can install PulseAudio easily enough by rerunning Star's welcome script.

The default JWM environment is very plain and empty, which suited me. My only complaint was the constantly updating Conky status panel at the bottom of the screen. I was able to disable Conky, but it required digging into JWM's configuration files. Which brings me to another point: many users will probably prefer to try heavier editions of Star (like Xfce) to gain access to more user friendly configuration tools. The JWM edition is intentionally bare bones and probably best suited to more experienced users.

One last observation I had while using Star is that it is based on Devuan 1.0.0, which presents us with software that is about three years old (or more) at this point. This means some packages, like LibreOffice, are notably behind upstream versions. Since Star is best suited for older computers, this may not be an issue for most users, but it is worth keeping in mind that Star's software repository is a few years old at this point.

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LXer: OxygenOS Android 8.0 Oreo Open Beta Available For OnePlus 3/3T

Monday 16th of October 2017 03:19:03 AM
Following a closed beta cycle, OnePlus has decided to let every 3 and 3T owner get in on the Android 8.0 Oreo action.

Reddit: What is Nix and Why you should try it!

Monday 16th of October 2017 03:01:45 AM

TuxMachines: Ubuntu 17.10: Poll, Final Testing, 20171015 Builds

Monday 16th of October 2017 02:02:44 AM

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TuxMachines: GNOME: Outreachy and retro-gtk

Monday 16th of October 2017 01:59:25 AM
  • There's One Week Left To Apply For Outreachy Round 15

    There's one week left for women and other under-represented groups in the open-source world to apply for Outreachy Round 15 for a winter internship to work on various projects.

    Outreachy applications are due 23 October and accepted participants are announced in early November for this $5500 USD internship period that runs from December to March. This round is open to: "internationally to women (cis and trans), trans men, and genderqueer people. Internships are also open to residents and nationals of the United States of any gender who are Black/African American, Hispanic/Latin@, Native American/American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander."

  • retro-gtk: Renaissance

    This is the second article in a small series about retro-gtk, I recommend you to read the first one, retro-gtk: Postmortem, before this one.

    In the previous article I listed some problems I encountered while developing and using retro-gtk; in this one I will present some solutions I implemented to fix them! All that is presented in this article is part of the newly-released retro-gtk 0.13.1, which is the first version of the 0.14 development cycle.

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TuxMachines: today's howtos

Monday 16th of October 2017 01:57:00 AM
  • ScalaFX: ListView with CellFactory
  • Business accounting with Odoo

    Odoo is, according to Wikipedia, "the most popular open source ERP system." Thus, any survey of open-source accounting systems must certainly take a look in that direction. This episode in the ongoing search for a suitable accounting system for LWN examines the accounting features of Odoo; unfortunately, it comes up a bit short.

    Odoo is the current incarnation of the system formerly known as OpenERP; it claims to have over two million users. It is primarily implemented in Python, and carries the LGPLv3 license. Or, at least, the free part of Odoo is so licensed; Odoo is an open-core product with many features reserved for its online or "Enterprise" offerings. The enterprise version comes with source code, but it carries a proprietary license and an end-user license agreement forbidding users from disabling the "phone home" mechanism that, among other things, enforces limits on the number of users. Online offerings are not of interest for this series, and neither is proprietary software (the whole point is to get away from proprietary systems), so this review is focused on the community edition.

  • TeX Live Manager: JSON output
  • Google App Engine: Using subdomains
  • How to Switch to Xorg from Wayland in Ubuntu 17.10 [Quick Tip]
  • tmux config
  • Secure and flexible backup server with dm-crypt and btrfs

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TuxMachines: Linux Kernel: Linux 4.15, F2FS, Block Layer

Monday 16th of October 2017 01:19:10 AM
  • Linux 4.15 Is Shaping Up To be An Exciting Kernel, Especially For AMD Users

    There still is a few weeks to go until the Linux 4.14 kernel will be released, but following that the Linux 4.15 kernel is shaping up to be a very exciting cycle.

  • F2FS Tools 1.9 Released With Encryption & More

    An updated version of the user-space F2FS (Flash Friendly File-System) utilities was quietly released a few weeks back.

    The f2fs-tools 1.9 update is a fairly big update for adding the bits for recent additions to the F2FS kernel driver. Now handled by f2fs-tools is dealing with encryption support, sparse support, inode checksum support, no-heap allocation is enabled by default, and support for the CP_TRIMMED_FLAG.

  • Improvements in the block layer

    Jens Axboe is the maintainer of the block layer of the kernel. In this capacity, he spoke at Kernel Recipes 2017 on what's new in the storage world for Linux, with a particular focus on the new block-multiqueue subsystem: the degree to which it's been adopted, a number of optimizations that have recently been made, and a bit of speculation about how it will further improve in the future.

    Back in 2011, Intel published a Linux driver for NVM Express (or NVMe, where NVM is the Non-Volatile Memory Host Controller Interface), which was its new bus for accessing solid-state storage devices (SSDs). This driver was incorporated into the mainline kernel in 2012, first appearing in 3.3. It allowed new, fast SSD devices to be run at speed, but that gave no improvement if the block subsystem continued to treat them as pedestrian hard drives. So a new, scalable block layer known as blk-mq (for block-multiqueue) was developed to take better advantage of these fast devices; it was merged for 3.13 in 2014. It was introduced with the understanding that all of the old drivers would be ported to blk-mq over time; this continues, even though most of the mainstream block storage devices have by now been successfully ported. Axboe's first focus was a status update on this process.

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TuxMachines: Events: LibreOffice Conference 2017 and Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC)

Monday 16th of October 2017 01:15:57 AM
  • LibreOffice Conference 2017

    This week the annual LibreOffice conference was held in Rome and I had the pleasure to attend. The city of Rome is migrating their IT infrastructure to open software and standards and the city council was kind enough to provide the awesome venue for the event, the Campidoglio.

  • More from the testing and fuzzing microconference

    A lot was discussed and presented in the three hours allotted to the Testing and Fuzzing microconference at this year's Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC), but some spilled out of that slot. We have already looked at some discussions on kernel testing that occurred both before and during the microconference. Much of the rest of the discussion will be summarized below. As it turns out, a discussion on the efforts by Intel to do continuous-integration (CI) testing of graphics hardware and drivers continued several hundred miles north the following week at the X.Org Developers Conference (XDC); that will be covered in a separate article.

  • The NumWorks graphing calculator

    As the Internet of Things (IoT) becomes ever more populous, there is no shortage of people warning us that the continual infusion into our lives of hard-to-patch proprietary devices running hard-to-maintain proprietary code is a bit of a problem. It is an act of faith for some, myself included, that open devices running free software (whether IoT devices or not) are easier to maintain than proprietary, closed ones. So it's always of interest when freedom (or something close to it) makes its way into a class of devices that were not previously so blessed.

    In this case, the device is the humble scientific calculator. Many people now use their smartphones when they need to do sums, but others still find a calculator a useful thing to have at hand. Recently, NumWorks, a new scientific graphing calculator with an open-design ethos was released. Although it is far from fully free at this point, it is a major step forward from the user-hostile position most calculator manufacturers have taken, and it is interesting to see to what extent it fulfills its promise.

    [...]

    It also would not require NumWorks to try to make the in-browser support work on all the browsers that people use on their many Linux distributions; so Linux support may get better soon. For readers who want to get up and running now, the toolchain isn't all that painful to assemble.

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More in Tux Machines

Radeon Linux Gaming Performance: Ubuntu 17.04 vs. Ubuntu 17.10

With Ubuntu 17.10 set to ship tomorrow that features just not an upgraded Linux kernel and Mesa 3D stack but also transitions from Unity 7 + X.Org to GNOME Shell + Wayland, here are some comparison gaming benchmarks on a few different AMD Radeon graphics cards. Ubuntu 17.04 shipped six months ago with Linux 4.10 and Mesa 17.0.7 as the main graphics components for open-source driver users while now with Ubuntu 17.10 is the Linux 4.13 kernel and Mesa 17.2.2. The six months of improvements to Mesa alone are massive for Intel and Radeon users with the RADV/ANV Vulkan drivers maturing much over this time (17.10 still doesn't ship with the Vulkan drivers, but are just a sudo apt install mesa-vulkan-drivers away) as well as many performance improvements and new extensions for the growing number of bundled OpenGL drivers. If you read Phoronix daily, you should already be well versed on the many Mesa accomplishments over this time span. Read more

Linux on Galaxy is Samsung's most impressive DeX app yet

Alongside the Galaxy S8/S8+, Samsung also introduced DeX to the world this past February. DeX is Samsung's vision for the future of desktop computing, and while it still has a way to go before it's truly useful or practical for everyone, Linux on Galaxy is a new app that Samsung hopes will make DeX more appealing to developers. Samsung announced Linux on Galaxy at its developer conference on October 18, and although the app is still in a trial phase, it already sounds pretty impressive. Read more Also: Samsung unveils 'Linux on Galaxy' for DeX -- run Fedora and Ubuntu on your Note8?

Skylake embedded computer has a thin 1U profile

Advantech has expanded its line of fanless, barebone EPC computers with a 43mm high “EPC-T1232” system based on a Skylake U-series thin Mini-ITX board. In August, Advantech launched its Linux-ready AIMB-232 thin Mini-ITX SBC featuring 6th Gen “Skylake” U-Series CPUs. Now it has followed up with an EPC-T1232 barebone computer based on the SBC, or specifically, the AIMB-T12325W-00Y0E model. Like the SBC, the EPC-T1232 has a low profile, measuring 250 x 210 x 43mm. Read more

today's leftovers