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Updated: 1 hour 7 min ago

Reddit: Fast PDF Viewer?

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 10:20:52 PM

It looks like there's a whole lot of options for PDF viewers out there, so I'm hoping someone can offer a recommendation based on what I actually need.

I'm looking for four things basically: * Supports images * Can do text selection (and copying) * Can display multiple pages at once (continuous mode) * As fast as possible while satisfying the above three requirements. I'm going to be using this on limited hardware, so efficiency is more important than features. This is also the reason I don't just use one of the browser-integrated viewers.

I'm using evince right now, which is reasonably fast, but I don't like the way smooth scroll is implemented, and can't find a way to disable it.

Thanks!

submitted by /u/Unknownloner
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LXer: The Apache Software Foundation's Two New Big Data Projects Tackle Science and Processing

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 09:57:13 PM
The Apache Software Foundation is making a big commitment to Big Data. As reported in this post, in recent months the foundation has promoted a slew of open source Big Data projects to Top-Level Status.  This puts a number of them on the same kind of development fast track that catapulted the Spark project to success.

Reddit: how do i send a wakeonlan command

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 09:33:30 PM

Hi folks, Im considering setting up wakeonlan for my ubuntu machine...there seems to be a few good guides and options out there for how to do it...but non of them cover this ......how do i send the command to wake on lan??? Is it possible to do this from a chromebook? (not running crouton)

submitted by /u/danmoxon1
[link] [comments]

LXer: Microsoft Says It Loves Linux, But Its Anti-Linux Patent Trolls Are Still Around and Active

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 09:00:02 PM
Highlighting just two of the many entities that Microsoft (and partners) use in order to induce additional costs on Free (as in freedom) software

Reddit: What information do you like to see in a README?

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 08:48:24 PM

As I was fixing a README for the nth time, I got to thinking. I usually put in what I think is useful, but that's not necessarily what everyone else wants.

Based on hanging around here for a few years, here's what I've come up with:

  • Name of the project (duh)
  • Description of the project (also duh)
  • Run time dependencies (questionable perhaps)
  • Build time dependencies (also questionable)
  • Up to date screenshots (if applicable)
  • Build instructions
  • Example usage
  • Slim troubleshooting section

What I probably wouldn't put in:

  • Package information (unless it's distro specific, such as an Arch install script or something)
  • Extensive examples

What am I missing? What would/do you put in your READMEs?

submitted by /u/cac2573
[link] [comments]

Reddit: Full Support for IPv6 - Let's Encrypt

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 08:19:58 PM

Reddit: 3 open source desktop publishing tools

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 08:18:48 PM

LXer: How to restore older file versions in Git

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 08:02:51 PM
In today's article you will learn how to find out where you are in the history of your project, how to restore older file versions, and how to make Git branches so you can safely conduct wild experiments.

Phoronix: Clear Linux Already Jumps Onto The Linux 4.7 Kernel

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 07:38:06 PM
The Linux 4.7 kernel may be just two days old, but already it's being shipped as the default kernel to Intel's Clear Linux operating system...

TuxMachines: today's leftovers

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 07:28:49 PM
  • Last gasp: Microsoft updates Get Windows 10 nagster, KB 3035583, yet again

    With nine days to go, Microsoft really, really wants you to claim your free upgrade to Windows 10. Come to think of it, Microsoft has really, really wanted you to upgrade your Windows 7 or 8.1 PC to Windows 10 for more than a year, and backed it with the GWX subsystem -- first installed by KB 3035583 in March 2015, 15 months ago.

  • AMD FireRender is now the open-source Radeon ProRender
  • NWM: An X11 Window Manager Written In Node.js

    In case you ever wanted to have a Node.js window manager, there's now one that works for X11 environments that works on Chrome OS, Debian, and friends.

  • We’ve come a long way from where we began!

    After working for several weeks on our WikiRating:Google Summer of Code project Davide, Alessandro and I have slowly reached up to the level where we can now visualize the entire project in its final stages.

  • Bringing your kids to GUADEC 2016
  • GNOME Keysign - Report #2 GSoC 2016

    More than a week ago I blogged about the new GUI made with GtkBuilder and Glade [1]. Now, I will talk about what has changed since then with the GUI and also the new functionality that has been added to it.

    I will start with the new "transition" page which I've added for the key download phase. Before going more in depth, I have to say that the app knows at each moment in what state it is, which really helps in adding more functionality.

  • Introducing: openSUSE heroes

    During the last weeks, the openSUSE board and others expressed their concern about the current state of some openSUSE infrastructure: especially the reaction times to change something in the setup were mentioned multiple times. Looks like we lost some administrators and/or contact points at SUSE who helped out in the past to eliminate problems or work together with the community.

    As result, there was a meeting held during the openSUSE Conference 2016, including some SUSE employees and openSUSE community members to discuss the current situation and search for some possible solutions. The discussion was very fruitful and we’d like to share some of the results here to inform everyone and actively ask for help. If you want to join us, the openSUSE heroes, do not hesitate to contact us and join an incredible team!

  • Artila Releases New Cortex-A5 based industrial embedded Linux computer

read more

TuxMachines: Server Administration

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 07:28:19 PM
  • Open Source Docker Monitoring & Logging

    Docker is growing by leaps and bounds, and along with it, its ecosystem. Being light, the predominant container deployment involves running just a single app or service inside each container. Most software products and services are made up of at least several such apps/services. We all want all our apps/services to be highly available and fault tolerant. Thus, Docker containers in an organization quickly start popping up like mushrooms after the rain. They multiply faster than rabbits.While, in the beginning, we play with them like cute little pets, as their numbers quickly grow we realize we are dealing with a herd of cattle, implying we’ve become cowboys. Managing a herd with your two hands, a horse, and a lasso will only get you so far. You won’t be able to ride after each and every calf that wonders in the wrong direction. To get back to containers from this zoological analogy—operating so many moving pieces at scale is impossible without orchestration—this is why we’ve seen the rise of Docker Swarm, Kubernetes, Mesos, CoreOS, RancherOS, and so on.

  • DevOps: A Pillar of Modern IT Infrastructure

    A massive transformation is underway in the way we manage IT infrastructure. More companies are looking for improved agility and flexibility. They are moving from traditional server stacks to cloudy infrastructure to support a new array of applications and services that must be delivered at breakneck pace in order to remain competitive.

  • The one big change in IT

    Yet Bob does not believe the devops hammer should be used on anything that looks remotely like a nail. Accounting systems, supply chain management systems, warehouse management systems, and so on do not benefit from the constant modification enabled by devops. Those are bound by precise, interlocking processes along with granular permissions and regulations. Here, continuous change invites disaster of the type that ITIL-huggers and OCM (organizational change management) proponents fear most.

read more

TuxMachines: Linux 4.7

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 07:27:32 PM
  • Collabora contributions to Linux Kernel 4.7

    Linux Kernel 4.7 was released this week with a total of 36 contributions from five Collabora engineers. It includes the first contributions from Helen as Collaboran and the first ever contributions on the kernel from Robert Foss. Here are some of the highlights of the work Collabora have done on Linux Kernel 4.7.

    Enric added support for the Analogix anx78xx DRM Bridge and fixed two SD Card related issues on OMAP igep00x0: fix remove/insert detection and enable support to read the write-protect pin.

    Gustavo de-staged the sync_file framework (Android Sync framework) that will be used to add explicit fencing support to the graphics pipeline and started a work to clean up usage of legacy vblank helpers.

  • The new Linux Kernel 4.7 is now officially released

    For users who are running some form of Linux, this should come as welcome news--the final version of the Linux Kernel 4.7 is now finally released. Linux founder Linus Torvalds said of the announcement, “Despite it being two weeks since rc7, the final patch wasn’t all that big, and much of it is trivial one- and few-liners. There’s a couple of network drivers that got a bit more loving.”

  • Linux 4.7 lands

read more

TuxMachines: Leftovers: Software

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 07:26:58 PM
  • OpenVZ 7.0 Becomes A Complete Linux Distribution, Based On VzLinux

    OpenVZ, a long-standing Linux virtualization technology and similar to LXC and Solaris Containers, is out with their major 7.0 release.

    OpenVZ 7.0 has focused on merging the OpenVZ and Virtuozzo code-bases along with replacing their own hypervisor with that of Linux's KVM. Under OpenVZ 7.0, it has become a complete Linux distribution based upon VzLinux.

  • OpenVZ 7.0 released

    I’m pleased to announce the release of OpenVZ 7.0. The new release focuses on merging OpenVZ and Virtuozzo source codebase, replacing our own hypervisor with KVM.

  • Announcing git-cinnabar 0.4.0 beta 2

    Git-cinnabar is a git remote helper to interact with mercurial repositories. It allows to clone, pull and push from/to mercurial remote repositories, using git.

  • FreeIPA Lightweight CA internals

    In the preceding post, I explained the use cases for the FreeIPA lightweight sub-CAs feature, how to manage CAs and use them to issue certificates, and current limitations. In this post I detail some of the internals of how the feature works, including how signing keys are distributed to replicas, and how sub-CA certificate renewal works. I conclude with a brief retrospective on delivering the feature.

  • Lightweight Sub-CAs in FreeIPA 4.4

    Last year FreeIPA 4.2 brought us some great new certificate management features, including custom certificate profiles and user certificates. The upcoming FreeIPA 4.4 release builds upon this groundwork and introduces lightweight sub-CAs, a feature that lets admins to mint new CAs under the main FreeIPA CA and allows certificates for different purposes to be issued in different certificate domains. In this post I will review the use cases and demonstrate the process of creating, managing and issuing certificates from sub-CAs. (A follow-up post will detail some of the mechanisms that operate behind the scenes to make the feature work.)

  • RcppArmadillo 0.7.200.2.0

    The second Armadillo release of the 7.* series came out a few weeks ago: version 7.200.2. And RcppArmadillo version 0.7.200.2.0 is now on CRAN and uploaded to Debian. This followed the usual thorough reverse-dependecy checking of by now over 240 packages using it.

    For once, I let it simmer a little preparing only a package update via the GitHub repo without preparing a CRAN upload to lower the update frequency a little. Seeing that Conrad has started to release 7.300.0 tarballs, the time for a (final) 7.200.2 upload was now right.

    Just like the previous, it now requires a recent enough compiler. As g++ is so common, we explicitly test for version 4.6 or newer. So if you happen to be on an older RHEL or CentOS release, you may need to get yourself a more modern compiler. R on Windows is now at 4.9.3 which is decent (yet stable) choice; the 4.8 series of g++ will also do. For reference, the current LTS of Ubuntu is at 5.4.0, and we have g++ 6.1 available in Debian testing.

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TuxMachines: Red Hat and Fedora

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 07:21:57 PM

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TuxMachines: Leftovers: Debian

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 07:20:55 PM
  • Debian LGBTIQA+

    I have a long overdue blog entry about what happened in recent times. People that follow my tweets did catch some things. Most noteworthy there was the Trans*Inter*Congress in Munich at the start of May. It was an absolute blast. I met so many nice and great people, talked and experienced so many great things there that I'm still having a great motivational push from it every time I think back. It was also the time when I realized that I in fact do have body dysphoria even though I thought I'm fine with my body in general: Being tall is a huge issue for me. Realizing that I have a huge issue (yes, pun intended) with my length was quite relieving, even though it doesn't make it go away. It's something that makes passing and transitioning for me harder. I'm well aware that there are tall women, and that there are dedicated shops for lengthy women, but that's not the only thing that I have trouble with. What bothers me most is what people read into tall people: that they are always someone they can lean on for comfort, that tall people are always considered to be self confident and standing up for themselves (another pun, I know ... my bad).

  • [GSOC] Week 8&9 Report

    This particular week has been tiresome as I did catch a cold . I did come back from Cape Town where debconf taking place. My arrival at Montreal was in the middle of the week, so this week is not plenty of news…

  • Debian on Jetson TK1

    I became interested in running Debian on NVIDIA's Tegra platform recently. NVIDIA is doing a great job getting support for Tegra upstream (u-boot, kernel, X.org and other projects). As part of ensuring good Debian support for Tegra, I wanted to install Debian on a Jetson TK1, a development board from NVIDIA based on the Tegra K1 chip (Tegra 124), a 32-bit ARM chip.

  • RC bugs 2016/01-29

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TuxMachines: Android Leftovers

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 07:19:28 PM

TuxMachines: Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 07:18:58 PM
  • Wal-Mart Proves Open Source Is Big Business
  • Keeping the FCC and Open Source Happy

    The FCC is worried. You and they spend all this time and energy getting your radio certified, and then some bozo hacks in, changes how the radio works, and puts you out of spec.

    And so, back in early 2015, the FCC issued some guidelines or questions regarding WiFi devices – particularly home routers – in an effort to ensure that your radio isn’t hackable.

    The result has been that some router makers have simply locked down the platform so that it’s no longer possible to do after-market modifications, and this has caused an outcry by after-market modifiers. The reason why it’s an issue is that these open-source developers have used the platform for adding apps or other software that, presumably, have nothing to do with the radio.

    In an attempt to find the magic middle way, the prpl organization, headed by Imagination Technologies (IMG) and featuring the MIPS architecture, recently put out a proof of concept that they say gives both assurance to the FCC and freedom to open-source developers.

    Questions from the FCC

  • Wire open-sources messaging client, woos developers

    Communications startup Wire has open-sourced the full codebase for its Wire app, so it's easier for developers to build their own encrypted messaging clients.

    Wire open-sourced the rest of the client base that wasn't initially publicly available, including components related to the user interface, the web and native clients, and some internal developer tools. The company always planned to open-source the codebase, but didn't start out that way initially "because we were still working on other features," Alan Duric, co-founder and CTO of Wire, wrote in a Medium post.

  • TUG 2016 – Day 1 – Routers and Reading
  • OpenStack Pico and Questa set to Debut in 2017 and 2018.

    Members of the OpenStack Foundation have been voting on upcoming release names and the results are now in.

  • Partnerships Ensure That OpenStack's Future is Running Containers on Kubernetes
  • Open source & cloud computing

    Today’s interview is with David Egts, chief technologist, North America Public Sector at Red Hat. Red Hat has been around for twenty-five years and has hit over two billion on annual revenue. Topics range from open source to partnering with Microsoft to the up and coming DevNationFederal.

    In the federal government circles, Red Had made a big splash years ago by working with NASA to have incredibly fast systems. Red Hat has expanded so much in the past decade that the conversation with Egts didn’t even get to NASA.

  • Open source project on Facebook will allow you to design apps [Ed: React is NOT "open source", Facebook maintains or reserves rights to revoke licence from competition]
  • Austria awards 'Open Data Oscars'

    Last month, the Austrian State Secretary Muna Duzdar handed out the 'Oscars of the Open Data Community'. The awards were part of the 'open4data.at challenge 2016' organised earlier this year. The annual challenge aims to bring open data and ideas together in innovative and creative solutions.

  • Open data platform on Emilia-Romagna reconstruction

    After the two earthquakes that caused multiple casualties and widespread damage in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna in 2012, multiple programmes were launched to reconstruct the affected areas. To make these efforts more transparent, a team from the Gran Sasso Science Institute last week presented an Open Data platform that will provide all information on who is responsible, which company is doing what, and how the money is being spent.

    The 'Open Data Ricostruzione' initiative was presented last week at the Italian Festival of Participation. The platform will bring together all the numbers, figures and information on the reconstruction, and allow visitors to visualise, filter, track and map the available data. All information will be made available as open data, in the original database format as well as JSON.

read more

LXer: ZYPPER - Easy way to manage packages on openSUSE

Tuesday 26th of July 2016 06:08:29 PM
Zypper is a command line package manager for suse & openSUSE distributions. It’s used to install, update, search & remove packages & manage repositories, perform various queries, and more. Zypper command-line interface to ZYpp system management library (libzypp).

More in Tux Machines

Programming

Security News

  • Security advisories for Thursday
  • Please save GMane!
  • The End of Gmane?
    In 2002, I grew annoyed with not finding the obscure technical information I was looking for, so I started Gmane, the mailing list archive. All technical discussion took place on mailing lists those days, and archiving those were, at best, spotty and with horrible web interfaces. The past few weeks, the Gmane machines (and more importantly, the company I work for, who are graciously hosting the servers) have been the target of a number of distributed denial of service attacks. Our upstream have been good about helping us filter out the DDoS traffic, but it’s meant serious downtime where we’ve been completely off the Internet.
  • Pwnie Express makes IoT, Android security arsenal open source
    Pwnie Express has given the keys to software used to secure the Internet of Things (IoT) and Android software to the open-source community. The Internet of Things (IoT), the emergence of devices ranging from lighting to fridges and embedded systems which are connected to the web, has paved an avenue for cyberattackers to exploit.
  • The Software Supply Chain Is Bedeviled by Bad Open-Source Code [Ed: again, trace this back to FUD firms like Sonatype in this case]
    Open-source components play a key role in the software supply chain. By reducing the amount of code that development organizations need to write, open source enables companies to deliver software more efficiently — but not without significant risks, including defective and outdated components and security vulnerabilities.
  • Securing a Virtual World [Ed: paywall, undated (no year but reposted)]
  • Google tells Android's Linux kernel to toughen up and fight off those horrible hacker bullies
    In a blog post, Jeff Vander Stoep of the mobile operating system's security team said that in the next build of the OS, named Nougat, Google is going to be addressing two key areas of the Linux kernel that reside at the heart of most of the world's smartphones: memory protection and reducing areas available for attack by hackers.

today's howtos

Chew on this: Ubuntu Core Linux comes to the uCRobotics Bubblegum-96 board

Linux and other open source software have been in the news quite a bit lately. As more and more people are seeing, closed source is not the only way to make money. A company like Red Hat, for instance, is able to be profitable while focusing its business on open source. Ubuntu is one of the most popular Linux-based operating systems, and it is not hard to see why. Not only is it easy to use and adaptable to much hardware (such as SoC boards), but there is a ton of free support online from the Ubuntu user community too. Today, Canonical announces a special Ubuntu Core image for the uCRobotics Bubblegum-96 board. Read more