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Updated: 1 hour 24 min ago

TuxMachines: Meet Jide's Remix OS: Android on the desktop done right

Tuesday 5th of April 2016 01:27:31 PM

AT A TIME when we're spending so much of our energy moaning about a certain operating system, it's nice to be able to say something positive rather than just tell you what not to buy.

Enter Remix OS, the answer to a problem that even Google has repeatedly failed to solve: how to bring the overwhelming popularity of Android to the desktop.

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TuxMachines: Leftovers: OSS

Tuesday 5th of April 2016 12:05:59 PM
  • 20 Popular Open Source Alternatives to Expensive Software
  • Impostor syndrome and the Dunning-Kruger effect in communities

    At OSCON 2016 in Austin, Jessica Rose, developer relations at Dream Factory, will give a talk called Impostor syndrome and individual competence. In this interview, she explains the role the Dunning-Kruger effect plays in open source communities, and offers tips for managers to help them recognize when candidates under- or over-estimate their own skill levels.

  • How to start a ChickTech chapter

    ChickTech is dedicated to introducing young girls to tech careers. It's best known for its high school program, in which teacher-nominated students are set up with workshops, mentorships, and job shadowing opportunities.

  • Weekly phpMyAdmin contributions 2016-W13
  • ignuit 2.24.2 released

    A "drill" mode has been added, category navigation is now possible when the category pane is switched off, and several bugs related to the new category properties dialog have been fixed. The user manual has also been updated.

  • [Older] US government commits to publish publicly financed software under Free Software licenses

    At the end of last week, the White House published a draft for a Source Code Policy. The policy requires every public agency to publish their custom-build software as Free Software for other public agencies as well as the general public to use, study, share and improve the software. At the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) we believe that the European Union, and European member states should implement similar policies. Therefore we are interested in your feedback to the US draft.

  • Think Globally, Build Locally With These Open-Source Recycling Machines

    Walk on almost any beach or look on the side of most roads and you’ll see the bottles, bags, and cast-off scraps of a polymeric alphabet soup – HDPE, PET, ABS, PP, PS. Municipal recycling programs might help, but what would really solve the problem would be decentralized recycling, and these open-source plastics recycling machines might just jump-start that effort.

  • A spiritual successor to Aaron Swartz is angering publishers all over again

    Stop us if you’ve heard this before: a young academic with coding savvy has become frustrated with the incarceration of information. Some of the world's best research continues to be trapped behind subscriptions and paywalls. This academic turns activist, and this activist then plots and executes the plan. It's time to free information from its chains—to give it to the masses free of charge. Along the way, this research Robin Hood is accused of being an illicit, criminal hacker.

    This, of course, describes the tale of the late Aaron Swartz. His situation captured the Internet’s collective attention as the data crusader attacked research paywalls. Swartz was notoriously charged as a hacker for trying to free millions of articles from popular academic hub JSTOR. At age 26, he tragically committed suicide just ahead of his federal trial in 2013.

    But suddenly in 2016, the tale has new life. The Washington Post decries it as academic research's Napster moment, and it all stems from a 27-year-old bioengineer turned Web programmer from Kazakhstan (who's living in Russia). Just as Swartz did, this hacker is freeing tens of millions of research articles from paywalls, metaphorically hoisting a middle finger to the academic publishing industry, which, by the way, has again reacted with labels like "hacker" and "criminal."

  • GitHub Now Lets You Block Troublesome Users From Public Repositories

    GitHub is a git repository service widely used to host open source software projects. The beauty of open source projects on GitHub is that people can collaborate to edit and improve the code. Trouble is, with multiple people working on the same project, it can get a bit chaotic and one uncooperative coder can ruin it for everybody. This is why GitHub is now letting project owners of public repositories block abusive users.

  • Free ANSI Event to focus on open source and its community impact.

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More in Tux Machines

No Ubuntu Back Doors, Windows and Mac Migrations

Today in Linux news Microsoft's market share has dipped below 90% and Mac is disappearing from Linux conventions. Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth said in an interview today that security and encryption are a commitment of Ubuntu's. Jesse Smith reviewed the latest version of Ubuntu and OMG!Ubuntu! shared some glimpses of Ubuntu in the wild. Bryan Lunduke listed 12 "Linux geeks" all users should follow on social media and Sandra Gittlen highlighted six colleges that "immerse students in Open Source." Read more

pfSense 2.3 Open-Source BSD Firewall Gets Patch That Fixes NTP Security Issues

pfSense developer Chris Buechler announced the availability of a small update for the stable pfSense 2.3 open-source firewall platform based on the FreeBSD operating system. Introduced as pfSense 2.3 Update 1, this is a small patch that only fixes the recently discovered security issues in the Network Time Protocol (NTP) packages, upgrading them from version 4.2.8p6 to 4.2.8p7, and it shouldn't be confused with pfSense 2.3.1, which will be released in the coming weeks as the first maintenance build. Read more

Contributing to open source software with Ian Varley of Salesforce

With open source, you're expanding the sphere of people who might potentially care a lot about your code. You find others who have similar problems, and who can leverage your work and maybe even extend it. The knowledge that you've helped someone avoid "rebuilding the wheel" is really gratifying, and it's amplified when those people actually start getting so involved that they give you contributions of code or ideas. The project picks up steam, and you might even get unforeseen help tackling those issues you didn't have bandwidth to tackle yourself. Really, it's the gift that keeps on giving. Read more

IPFire 2.19 Core Update 101 Patches Cross-Site-Scripting Vulnerability in Web UI

The development team behind the IPFire software have announced the general availability of the Core Update 101 of the IPFire 2.19 Linux kernel-based firewall distribution. Read more