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Updated: 1 hour 29 min ago

TuxMachines: today's leftovers

Saturday 28th of October 2017 11:23:06 AM

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TuxMachines: Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

Saturday 28th of October 2017 11:22:28 AM
  • How Can Debian Turn Disagreement into Something that Makes us Stronger

    Recently, when asked to engage with the Debian Technical Committee, a maintainer chose to orphan their package rather than discuss the issue brought before the committee. In another decision earlier this year, a maintainer orphaned their package indicating a lack of respect for the approach being taken and the process. Unfortunately, this joins an ever longer set of issues where people walk away from the TC process disheartened and upset.

    For me personally the situations where maintainers walked away from the process were hard. People I respect and admire were telling me that they were unwilling to participate in our dispute resolution process. In one case the maintainer explicitly did not respect a process I had been heavily involved in. As someone who values understanding and build a team, I feel disappointed and hurt thinking about this.

  • Full Circle Magazine #126
  • Ubuntu Desktop Weekly Update: GNOME Fixes & New Snaps

    I’ll be starting the weekly round-up posts again now that the release is out and 18.04 is getting under way. At this early stage in the development cycle we’re spending a week or so tidying up the loose ends from 17.10, SRUing the important fixes that we’ve found, getting ready to sync new packages from Debian, and generally doing the groundwork to give us a clear run at 18.04. As you know, 18.04 will be an LTS release and so we will be focusing on stability and reliability this cycle, as well as a few new features. I’ll give a more detailed view into 18.04 in the coming weeks.

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TuxMachines: Lightweight Linux Distributions, KDE Server Decoration, GNOME GitLab initiative

Saturday 28th of October 2017 11:18:29 AM
  • 10 Best Lightweight Linux Distributions For Older Computers In 2017

    What do you do with your old computers? The one which once had good hardware configuration but now those are considered outdated. Why not revive your old computer with Linux? I am going to list best lightweight Linux distributions that you can use on your older PC.

    While our focus is on older computers, you can also use most of these lightweight Linux on relatively new hardware. This will give you a better performance if you use your computer for resource-heavy usage such as video editing on Linux.

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  • KDE Server Decoration Protocol Proposed For Wayland-Protocols

    Yesterday the GTK tool-kit added support for KDE's server-side decorations on Wayland to be used when client-side decorations are not active. Now it's been proposed adding the KDE Server Decoration Protocol to the upstream Wayland-Protocols repository.

  • GitLab initiative – Short summary

    Georges told me some people outside of our community asked about our GitLab initiative and that there is some confusion what the status is and that contrary to my belief, there is actual interest outside of GNOME. Since I guess people outside of our community didn’t follow our regular conversations, discussions and update reports in our GNOME mailing list for general desktop discussion,  I’ll do a short summarize.

    Almost a year ago we started looking into alternatives to Bugzilla and cgit, and it became a long research, discussion and meeting with several parties and a few of us, Alberto, Allan and me, which then expanded to more people in order to give a different point of vision, like Emmanuele, Daniel, etc. All the research, work and reasoning we did and our eventual decision for a recommendation is written in our wiki page.

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TuxMachines: Software. HowTos and Games

Saturday 28th of October 2017 11:15:09 AM
  • Synergy – Share Your Mouse and Keyboard Between Multiple Computers

    If you are one to use many screens at work or at your workstation at home then you are probably aware of Synergy. After all, it is the most voted Mouse and Keyboard sharing software on Slant.

    Synergy is a cross-platform app that lets you share your mouse and keyboard across multiple computers as if they are one – thereby providing a single cohesive user experience.

  • 6 Best Linux Music Players That Every User Must Try — (2017 Edition)

    Watching movies and playing music is one of the primary entertainment purposes served by our computers. So, when you move to a new operating system, it makes perfect sense if you look for useful media players.

  • Anypaste – Share And Upload Files To Compatible Hosting Sites Automatically

    A while ago, we have written a guide about Transfer.sh which allows you to share files over Internet from command-line. Today, we will see yet another file sharing utility called Anypaste. It is a simple script to share and upload files to compatible hosting sites depending upon the type of the files, automatically. You don’t need to manually log in to the hosting sites and upload or share your files. Anypaste will pick the right hosting sites depends upon the type of the file you want to upload. To put this simply, photos will get uploaded to image hosting sites, videos to video sites, code to pastebins. Cool, yeah? Anypaste is completely free, open source and light-weight script and you can do everything from command line. You don’t need to depend on any heavy, memory-consuming GUI apps to upload and share files.

  • Getting a Virtual Machine’s IP Address from virsh
  • Telegram notifications for Jenkins builds
  • Fallback to default values for NULL columns in Rust SQLite
  • Minilens – Fun Open Source Puzzle Platform Game

    Minilens is a fun open source puzzle-platform game set on post-apocalyptic Earth. The star of the show is Minilens, a robot that lacks the ability to jump. His task is to cleanse Earth of radioactive barrels, and at the same time collect the only life left on the planet — flowers.

    There are 45 levels to solve. The game offers a great way to stimulate your grey matter, particularly as some of the levels are tricky to solve. And when (if?) you’ve solved all the levels or you’re totally stumped, the fun doesn’t end. It’s easy to make new challenging levels using the Godot Engine. The engine creates games targeting PC, console, mobile and web platforms, and has dozens of developers and more than 400 contributors.

  • FORMULA ONE returns to Linux with F1 2017, coming November 2nd

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TuxMachines: Programming: Android 8.1 Developer, Z Garbage Collector, GNU C Library

Saturday 28th of October 2017 11:08:09 AM
  • Android 8.1 Developer Preview hands-on: Everything new in Google’s latest update

    Google gave us 64 days to get used to Android 8.0 Oreo being the latest version of Android. While only one third-party phone has upgraded to the latest version, Google is already dropping a developer preview for the next version of Android on the world. Two days ago it released the Android 8.1 Developer Preview, and after a solid day of trying to flash it, totally bricking a Pixel 2, and later having Google pull the update files because they didn't work, we're here to report what Android 8.1 is actually like.

    Like most of the .1 releases these days, it's full of some minor, but important, updates that probably just weren't ready in time for Android 8.0.

  • ZGC large-heap Java garbage collector may go open source

    An Oracle-developed, low-latency Java garbage collector geared to large heaps could move to the open source community, if a proposal to do so gets community approval. Votes are due by November 8.

    Called the Z Garbage Collector (ZGC), the project is designed to support multiterabyte heaps, have pause times not exceeding 10 milliseconds, and offer no more than a 15 percent application reduction throughput compared to the G1 garbage collector.

  • Point releases for the GNU C Library

    The GNU C Library (glibc) project produces regular releases on an approximately six-month cadence. The current release is 2.26 from early August; the 2.27 release is expected at the beginning of February 2018. Unlike many other projects, though, glibc does not normally create point releases for important fixes between the major releases. The last point release from glibc was 2.14.1, which came out in 2011. A discussion on the need for a 2.26 point release led to questions about whether such releases have a useful place in the current software-development environment.

    The glibc 2.26 release is generally only found in relatively fast-moving distributions at this point. For most users, 2.26 has been without problems, but that is not true for everybody. There have been a few significant regressions in this release that have required fixes; one of those was seen as important enough that the question of creating a 2.26.1 point release was raised. Romain Naour subsequently brought that discussion to the libc-alpha mailing list. Having a point release containing important fixes would be helpful to downstream distributors that want to incorporate those fixes, he said.

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TuxMachines: OSS Leftovers

Saturday 28th of October 2017 11:06:59 AM
  • US Logistics Agency Launches Blockchain Sector Mapping Tool

    The U.S. government agency in charge of logistics is taking the next step in its effort to better understand blockchain.

    Through its Emerging Citizen Technology (ECT) program, a blockchain analysis effort first announced in September, the General Services Administration (GSA) this week opened to contributions from industry members, according to a post on its website.

    These contributions will now be compiled into an open-source tool called Atlas, which will include "programs, use cases and resources" created by the private sector and researchers working within government agencies.

  • Baidu Aims For 'Android' Of Robocar Tech With Open-Source Apollo Platform
  • Open source Apollo speeds up Baidu's self-driving software development

    In July, Chinese technology company Baidu made its Apollo 1.0 self-driving car software available as open source on Github, using the Apache/BSD license. By Day 4 of the release, it was the most downloaded C++ software on the site.

    At an Apollo meetup hosted by Baidu at its Sunnyvale, California, offices, company president Ya-Qin Zhang announced Apollo 1.5, a major iteration of the software, just three months after the initial release.

  • This Engineering student is studying how open-source software projects can increase diversity within computer science

    Engineering senior Judy Weng has been working alongside Penn professor Chris Murphy to better understand the lack of diversity in the field of computer science despite its rapidly increasing popularity across majors.

    Weng became interested in the subject when she took CIS 399, an open software development class Murphy taught earlier this year. Upon realizing that open source coding can serve as a resource to underrepresented minorities because of its collaborative structure, she began to work with Murphy to look deeper into the issue.

  • AT&T creates Open Source Lab at T-REX

    AT&T is reaching out to St. Louis’ tech startup community with a new Open Source Lab.

  • Mapbox weighs in on location platforms, augmented reality, and the open source enterprise

    With all the happy talk about AI and blockchain we’ve been hearing lately, we can lose track of where the traction really is. The open sourcing of the enterprise immediately comes to mind.

    At Constellation Research‘s Connected Enterprise 2017, I tracked down Alex Barth of Mapbox to talk about their location-platform and the how open source has driven their growth.

  • Catalonia Rejoices As Another Advocate Of Open Source Becomes Moodle Partner

    Founded in 2004, 3ipunt (read “tresipunt”) provides Moodle and open source solutions from an explicit place of support for open source technologies, communities, and thinking. As a member of CatPL, the largest network of Catalan language organizations supporting open source, 3ipunt commits to advocating for open source opportunities through a program that seeks higher recognition, from government to enterprise, and funding for open source initiatives. This is why the Moodle Partner status, through which 3ipunt now commits 10% of its revenue to Moodle HQ, enjoys complete philosophical alignment.

  • Kodi: set-top streaming boxes that take the complexity out of building your own media server

    Kodi boxes are commercial video-streaming gadgets that implement XBMC, a longstanding media-server free/open source project, in pre-packaged form, ready to accept third party plugins, including ones that access infringing streaming services, giving users access to practically every video, commercial and noncommercial, for free, with an easy search-interface.

    Though XBMC has been around for a long time, it is a real chore to set up your own standalone XBMC server, requiring that you buy a mini-ATX all-in-one PC, install a GNU/Linux OS on it, set up and configure XBMC, and so on. The Kodi boxes take all that complexity out of the picture, prepackaging the system in boxes purpose-built to sit unobtrusively on your media totem. They're a really interesting contrast to the set-top boxes the average American family is forced to spend $200/year renting from their cable-operators, whose power-hungry, trailing-edge architecture have been the subject of a Congressional "Unlock-the-Box" rule for decades, with no motion in sight.

  • The Little Black Box That Took Over Piracy [Ed: Conde Nast (Wall Street) is attacking Kodi. Dubbing it "Piracy" and "Black Box" even though it's FOSS]
  • Hitachi Vantara launches Pentaho 8.0 into global datasphere

    The Pentaho brand is now a fully signed up card-carrying element of Hitachi Vantara.

    But making good on its promise to invest in what was a company and is now a brand/product, the PentahoWorld 2017 user conference saw Hitachi Vantara launch the the Pentaho 8.0 version release.

  • Chrome 63 Beta: Dynamic module imports, async iterators and generators, Device Memory API, and permissions UI changes

    It’s challenging for developers to create one user experience that can work across all devices, due to varying device capabilities. The new Device Memory JavaScript API helps developers with this challenge by using the total RAM on a user’s machine to provide insights into device constraints. This insight enables developers to tailor content at runtime in accordance with hardware limitations. For example, developers can serve a “lite” app to users on low-end devices, resulting in better experiences and fewer frustrations. T

  • Chrome 63 Beta Rolls Out With Dynamic Module Imports, Device Memory API

    Ahead of the weekend, the beta of Chrome 63 is now available for all supported platforms.

  • Open Source Music Festival to Launch Next Month at Abrons Arts Center

    "Open Source is based on the simple idea that we share our creative work, and allow others to build upon it freely. We've built our whole music festival around this powerful concept." says Joel Fan explaining his inspiration for the Festival, "The open source movement is changing the world, and affects every part of our lives. As a pianist, I've always been fascinated by the way music is created - how musical ideas are remixed and new musical trends emerge. The Internet and the open source movement have radically changed the way we communicate, collaborate, and powers much of our creativity today. New innovations such as the blockchain will alter how we power our creativity in the near future. The artists and composers featured at the Festival have won "Genius" Grants, Grammys, Pulitzers, and have earned recognition throughout the world."

  • Rousing Masses to Fight Cancer with Open Source Machine Learning

    Here’s an open invitation to steal. It goes out to cancer fighters and tempts them with a new program that predicts cancer drug effectiveness via machine learning and raw genetic data.

    The researchers who built the program at the Georgia Institute of Technology would like cancer fighters to take it for free, or even just swipe parts of their programming code, so they’ve made it open source. They hope to attract a crowd of researchers who will also share their own cancer and computer expertise and data to improve upon the program and save more lives together.

  • Samsung's new Linux smartphones, Raspberry Pi laptops, and more open source news
  • A Look Back: Challenges Of Open Access In 2017 (An Industry Perspective)

    Over the course of the year, three issues repeatedly reared their heads as barriers to the successful implementation of Open Access: the burden of expected author OA expertise; the underutilization of metadata in the publication lifecycle, and the challenges posed to authors and institutions by one-off solutions. As the tenth Open Access Week draws to a close, with its focus on the concrete benefits of making scholarly research openly available, where have we gotten to in solving these problems and realizing the potential of OA?

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TuxMachines: Security: Updates, Reaper, KRACK, Cryptographic kKeycards, Flexera's FUD, Google Play, Windows BadRabbit

Saturday 28th of October 2017 10:59:51 AM
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Assessing the threat the Reaper botnet poses to the Internet—what we know now
  • KRACK, ROCA, and device insecurity

    It is a fairly bleak picture from a number of different viewpoints. One almost amusing outcome of this mess is contained near the end of Vanhoef's KRACK web page. He notified OpenBSD of the flaw in mid-July with an embargo (at the time) until the end of August. OpenBSD leader Theo de Raadt complained about the length of the embargo, so Vanhoef allowed OpenBSD to silently patch the flaw. "In hindsight this was a bad decision, since others might rediscover the vulnerability by inspecting their silent patch. To avoid this problem in the future, OpenBSD will now receive vulnerability notifications closer to the end of an embargo." That might not quite be the outcome De Raadt was hoping for with his (quite reasonable) complaint, especially given that Vanhoef strongly hints that there are other WiFi vulnerabilities in the pipeline.

  • A comparison of cryptographic keycards

    An earlier LWN article showed that private key storage is an important problem to solve in any cryptographic system and established keycards as a good way to store private key material offline. But which keycard should we use? This article examines the form factor, openness, and performance of four keycards to try to help readers choose the one that will fit their needs.

    I have personally been using a YubiKey NEO, since a 2015 announcement on GitHub promoting two-factor authentication. I was also able to hook up my SSH authentication key into the YubiKey's 2048 bit RSA slot. It seemed natural to move the other subkeys onto the keycard, provided that performance was sufficient. The mail client that I use, (Notmuch), blocks when decrypting messages, which could be a serious problems on large email threads from encrypted mailing lists.

    So I built a test harness and got access to some more keycards: I bought a FST-01 from its creator, Yutaka Niibe, at the last DebConf and Nitrokey donated a Nitrokey Pro. I also bought a YubiKey 4 when I got the NEO. There are of course other keycards out there, but those are the ones I could get my hands on. You'll notice none of those keycards have a physical keypad to enter passwords, so they are all vulnerable to keyloggers that could extract the key's PIN. Keep in mind, however, that even with the PIN, an attacker could only ask the keycard to decrypt or sign material but not extract the key that is protected by the card's firmware.

  • Study Examines Open Source Risks in Enterprise Software [Ed: Microsoft network promotes anti FOSS 'study' (marketing by Flexera)]
  • Google Play Protect is 'dead last' at fingering malware on Android

    Last month, German software testing laboratory AV-Test threw malware at 20 Android antivirus systems – and now the results aren't particularly great for Google.

    Its Play Protect system, which is supposed block malicious apps from running on your handheld, was beaten by every other anti-malware vendor.

  • NSA hacking tool EternalRomance found in BadRabbit

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Reddit: Need of Linux - Making the right career choice

Saturday 28th of October 2017 10:15:27 AM

TuxMachines: Flatpak 0.10 New Stable Series Adds Minor Improvements, 0.11 to Get New Features

Saturday 28th of October 2017 09:10:25 AM

Flatpak maintainer Alexander Larsson announced the release of a new stable Flatpak series, versioned 0.10.x, which introduces a handful of improvements and bug fixes.

Flatpak 0.10.0 is the first update in the new series, and it's a small release adding the "flatpak config" option to allow users to set the language settings, implement a workaround for some random OSTree static delta issues, adds /dev/mali0 to --device=dri, and fixes a bug that makes ld.so.conf files to not be generated.

"This is the first release in a new series of stable releases called 0.10.x. New features will be added to 0.11.x, and bugfixes will be backported to 0.10.x. During the early phase of the 0.10.x series we may also backport minor features, but we guarantee backwards compatibility," said Alexander Larsson.

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LXer: Scary Linux commands for Halloween

Saturday 28th of October 2017 08:01:20 AM
What Linux commands bring up visions of monsters and ghosts? Let's look and see!

TuxMachines: What is Magisk? Root Android Without Changing Partitions

Saturday 28th of October 2017 08:00:03 AM

If you are a hardcore android user who loves trying out the latest custom ROMs and mods, you must have surely faced a boot-loop. A condition in which your phone refuses to start because you messed up with your system. It is extremely disappointing and

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Tizen News

Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.

First Renesas based Raspberry Pi clone runs Linux

iWave’s “iW-RainboW-G23S” SBC runs Linux on a Renesas RZ/G1C, and offers -20 to 85°C support and expansion headers including a RPi-compatible 40-pin link. iWave’s iW-RainboW-G23S is the first board we’ve seen to tap the Renesas RZ/G1C SoC, which debuted earlier this year. It’s also the first Renesas based SBC we’ve seen that features the increasingly ubiquitous Raspberry Pi 85 x 56mm footprint, layout, and RPi-compatible 40-pin expansion connector. The board is also notable for providing -20 to 85°C temperature support. Read more Also: GameShell Is An Open Source And Linux-powered Retro Game Console That You’ll Love