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Updated: 26 min 48 sec ago

TuxMachines: 10 beautiful Android Wear watch face packs

Monday 30th of March 2015 03:49:49 AM

Unlike a smartwatch, A high-quality traditional watch doesn't need to be recharged on a daily basis. Also, it will likely be perfectly useful decades after its purchase, while a smartwatch isn't likely to endure the tests of time very well. But can you change a classic watch's face? Nope, we don't think so.

The ability to personalize an Android Wear smartwatch is cool indeed, and the collection of third-party watch faces available at the Play Store is growing steadily. Some are functional and feature-packed, others aim to deliver the best visual experience. The 10 Android Wear watch face packs we have below belong to the latter category. Check them out!

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Reddit: So, I'm thinking of being a Linux Developer

Monday 30th of March 2015 03:05:04 AM

What skillset does it take to be a linux developer?

submitted by Jncocontrol
[link] [2 comments]

Reddit: Tips for efficient command-line navigation.

Saturday 28th of March 2015 07:55:07 AM

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BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition review

The BQ Aquaris e4.5 Ubuntu Edition is not the debut Canonical must have envisaged for Ubuntu Phone, in the early days of the platform’s development. It’s a perfectly functional smartphone for the most part, and we like the concept of scopes, but the hardware is humdrum, performance is sluggish, and the software running on it is rough and ready, and full of holes. We’ll be tracking the progress of Ubuntu Phone with interest – it surely must get better than this – but this first device is one to write off to experience. Read more