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LXer: The Corrupting Influence of Money in the Linux Foundation (Bias for Sale)

Friday 2nd of September 2016 12:46:46 PM
The growing danger of a Linux Foundation which is funded not just by proprietary software giants but also direct opposition of Linux and serial violators of the licence of GNU (GPL)

LinuxInsider: FairWare Hackers May Take Ransoms, Keep Stolen Files

Friday 2nd of September 2016 12:00:00 PM
The latest ransomware intrusion that targets Linux servers, dubbed "FairWare," may be a classic server hack designed to bilk money from victims with no intent to return stolen files after payment in bitcoins is made. The attack reportedly targets a Linux server, deletes the Web folder, and then demands a ransom payment of two bitcoins for return of the stolen files. The attackers apparently do not encrypt the files but may upload them to a server under their control. Victims first learned about FairWare when they discovered their websites were down.

Reddit: Help with streaming a file from a different local machine

Friday 2nd of September 2016 11:45:42 AM

Hello,

I need help with something, hopefully you can help me or point me in the right direction.

I've a raspberry pi 3 in which I've some video files. I want to watch the video files on my laptop without having to transfer the files. I want to stream them. However, since the raspberry pi doesn't run that well these video files, I want to run them on my laptop.

I've ssh (with keys) configured, but haven't found a way to do it. I want to open the files with VLC (or mpv or something like that)

submitted by /u/user957
[link] [comments]

LXer: Monitoring Temperatures and Voltages in Linux

Friday 2nd of September 2016 11:38:09 AM
The ability to monitor the temperatures of key components is important, whether you’re gaming, overclocking, or doing something more businesslike and running a critical server. Linux includes modules in the kernel that allow it to access onboard sensors within components. Though, that alone is not enough.

TuxMachines: today's leftovers

Friday 2nd of September 2016 11:34:29 AM
  • Purism announces the creation of its Advisory Board

    Purism is pleased to announce the creation of its Advisory Board, comprised of top-tier experts from the Free Software community: Kyle Rankin, Matthew Garrett, Aaron Grattafiori, and Stefano Zacchiroli. Together, they bring their vision—with decades of experience in cybersecurity, privacy protection, and digital freedom—to Purism’s product development, as the company continues to create products that finally address privacy and digital rights by default, rights that 86% of computer users cite as a concern.

  • Microsoft made 'em do it: The latest Kaby Lake, Zen chips will support only Windows 10
  • Linux Journal September 2016
  • September 2016 Video Preview
  • IBM links Blockchain with AI in new Industry Platforms business unit

    IBM has underscored how seriously its taking Blockchain technology with the creation of a new business unit centered around it. The new business, called Industry Platforms, will be led by Global Business Services chief, Bridget van Kralingen.

    IBM’s entire blockchain leadership team will transition to the new business, which was first announced last year.

    As well as working on Blockchain technology, the Industry Platforms business will also work to promote its Watson artificial intelligence platform in the financial services sector.

    “The Industry Platforms business will bring clients radically optimized processes and marketplaces that leverage Watson, IBM Cloud, IBM Systems, blockchain, deep domain expertise and ecosystems of partners and developers,” said IBM CEO Ginni Rometty.

  • Habitat: Automating Applications, Minus Platform and Infrastructure Hassles

    Remember the days when technology platforms sat in silos and our fierce allegiance to them did too? “We’re a Mac shop,” admins would announce. “We’re all in on Windows,” another might say.

    Those days are quickly fading, along with the barriers that used to separate platform and infrastructure technologies. Instead, we are moving toward a world of containers, multiple instances of virtual machines, and multiple operating systems working in tandem. This is especially true in data centers, and open source tools are helping to drive the trend.

    There is a pronounced need for ways to run applications on multiple types of infrastructure, ranging from bare metal to virtual machines to containers to the cloud. That’s where Habitat comes in. It’s an open source project focused on “automation that travels with the application.” It has pedigree, too. Habitat comes from the makers of the venerable configuration management and automation platform Chef, which, like Puppet, has helped to optimize many heterogeneous technology environments.

  • KDE Arrives in Berlin, Elects Thomas Pfeiffer to the e.V. Board

    Today KDE has been arriving in Berlin for Akademy, our annual meeting, which is year is part of the larger QtCon conference. This year we are teaming up with KDAB to gather together with the wider community of Qt developers for the first time, which is a major opportunity to share experiences between the open source and the commercial worlds. Also at the gathering are the VLC developers. VLC is one of the most successful open source projects successfully reaching out to users on all platforms and is a project we have long cooperated with. And the Free Software Foundation Europe will be brining the important political edge to our talks.

  • Kubuntu-16.04 and updates

    I installed kubuntu-16.04 in April. Although I don’t use it much, I occasionally boot into it to check a few things. Whenever I booted into Kubuntu, I looked to see if the update applet was notifying me of updates. I left the system running for an hour or more, to give it plenty of time to find out.s

  • GTK Developers Continue Firming Up Their Long-Term Toolkit Plans

    Earlier this summer at a hackfest of GTK+ developers they came up with a plan for GTK4 and beyond with reworking how they'll do long-term stable releases. With GNOME/GTK+ 3.22 approaching, they are firming up their plans.

    Being published today via the GTK+ blog is Versioning and long term stability promise in GTK+. Hit that up if you want all the details about it.

  • Nautilus 3.22 Adds Batch File Renaming, Native Compression Features

    There are plenty of new and improved features to enjoy in Nautilus 3.22, which is on course to ship as part of GNOME 3.22 late next month.

  • Tumbleweed Enhances Encryption, has Massive Updates

    openSUSE users are at no loss for getting new software as this week the rolling distribution Tumbleweed had several snapshot releases and there was a beta release for openSUSE Leap 42.2.

    openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed, which was originally created by Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman, had six snapshots two weeks ago and four last week. This week we will look at another six snapshots.

  • Red Hat Takes Aim at VMware With RHV

    Although VMware and Red Hat might have seemed to be best buddies at last week's LinuxCon, this week it's become obvious that Red Hat is locked and loaded and has VMware in its sites. During a week when the suits at the virtualization company would doubtlessly like attention focused on Las Vegas and its VMWorld 2016 users' conference, Red Hat has been stealing the headlines on just about every major tech site with news of its own virtualization products.

  • Crash test dummy? Love the excitement of breaking an OS? Fedora 25 Alpha has landed

    If you're a chronic complainer and nit-picker with a spare machine and a willingness to suffer multiple crashes, weird screen artefacts and possible data loss: Fedora 25's alpha has landed ahead of its anticipated November 2016 release.

    If you want to help the developers by breaking stuff, don't risk dual-boot on OS X if you've got live data, because this known bug is a treat:

    “The installer appears to support volume shrink for OS X volumes (Apple Core Storage) by offering a Shrink button and sizing slider in Automatic partitioning; and likewise allow numeric resizing in Manual partitioning. However, setting the installer to resize these volumes and proceeding with installation will result in complete data loss of the volume. Resize the volume in OS X's Disk Utility to create free space before proceeding with the installation of Fedora.”

  • Linaro Announces First Development Board Compliant with 96Boards TV Platform Specification

    Linaro Ltd, the collaborative engineering organization developing open source software for the ARM® architecture, today announced support for the HiSilicon ‘Poplar’ board – the first development board compliant with the 96Boards Enterprise Edition TV Platform specification. The board is the latest addition to the 96Boards family, the open specification defining a platform for the delivery of low-cost 32-bit and 64-bit ARM ecosystem developer boards. It is available to purchase for under $100 from Tocoding Technologies.

  • HiSilicon's Poplar Is The First Linaro 96Boards EE TV Platform

    Linaro has announced the first development board that supports their 96Boards' Enterprise Edition TV Platform specification.

    The HiSilicon Poplar development board is their first TV Platform compliant product and targets set-top box developers and hobbyists. The Poplar dev board is powered by a Hi3798C V200 SoC that packs in a quad-core 64-bit Cortex-A53 processor and Mali T720 for graphics. The Poplar board costs $79 USD or closer to $100 when factoring in shipping.

read more

TuxMachines: Leftovers: Software

Friday 2nd of September 2016 11:33:04 AM
  • 100+ self-hosted alternatives to popular services

    Most of us use online services like Gmail, Dropbox, Skype, Evernote etc. on a daily basis without having control over the service. However, now it’s easier than ever to find a self-hosted alternative to your favorite online service and have complete control over it. In this article, we will share a huge list of self-hosted alternatives to popular online services.

  • RockMongo - A Graphical MongoDB administration tool

    RockMongo is a free, open source GUI database administration tool for MongoDB, just like phpMyAdmin to MySQL/MariaDB.

  • Atom 1.10 Hackable Text Editor Released with New Atom Package Manager Build

    Today, August 31, 2016, GitHub has had the great pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability of the Atom 1.10 stable version of their hackable text editor for application developers and programmers, along with the Beta of Atom 1.11.

    Atom 1.10 is here exactly 30 days after the launch of the Atom 1.9 and Atom 1.10 Beta builds on the first day of August 2016, and, as promised during the Beta stages of development, the biggest new feature of the Atom 1.10 stable release is the upgrade of the Atom Package Manager (APM) to run on Node 4.4.5 and npm 3.10.5.

  • Peek Is An Animated GIF Screen Recorder Tool for Linux

    Looking for a simple tool that lets you record a section of your screen and export it as a GIF? Take a peek at Peek, an app that can do exactly that.

  • OpenShot 2.1 Released With Animation Support, Improved Timeline

    A new version of open-source video editor OpenShot 2.1 has been released. We show you what's new and how you can install it on Ubuntu using a PPA.

  • Flowblade Linux Video Editor – Is It Any Good?

    Kdenlive is hugely popular and for good reason — it’s fast, easy to use and mostly stable.

    But open-source is all about choice, and in the comments section to that article many of you wrote about your experiences with other well-known video editors.

    Among those mentioned is long-time fave OpenShot, the hard-to-use Cinelerra, the buggy Shotcut, and (though not strictly a video editor) the powerful Blender.

    One app that wasn’t mentioned in the comments was Flowblade, a Python-based video editor for Linux.

  • Weblate 2.8

    Quite on schedule (just one day later), Weblate 2.7 is out today. This release brings Subversion support or improved zen mode.

  • Geekbench 4 Lands On iOS, Android , Windows, Linux And Mac

    Popular benchmarking application Geekbench has launched a new version of their software called Geekbench 4.

  • Stable Channel Update for Desktop
  • Chrome 53 Released With Speed Improvements, Shadow DOM

    Ending out August, Google has promoted Chrome/Chromium 53 to their stable channel.

    Chrome 53 is primarily geared at delivering new developer features with notification improvements, Shadow DOM v1 support, security fixes, various speed optimizations, and more.

  • Drupal 8.2, now with more outside-in

    Over the weekend, Drupal 8.2 beta was released. One of the reasons why I'm so excited about this release is that it ships with "more outside-in". In an "outside-in experience", you can click anything on the page, edit its configuration in place without having to navigate to the administration back end, and watch it take effect immediately. This kind of on-the-fly editorial experience could be a game changer for Drupal's usability.

    When I last discussed turning Drupal outside-in, we were still in the conceptual stages, with mockups illustrating the concepts. Since then, those designs have gone through multiple rounds of feedback from Drupal's usability team and a round of user testing led by Cheppers. This study identified some issues and provided some insights which were incorporated into subsequent designs.

    Two policy changes we introduced in Drupal 8 — semantic versioning and experimental modules — have fundamentally changed Drupal's innovation model starting with Drupal 8. I should write a longer blog post about this, but the net result of those two changes is ongoing improvements with an easy upgrade path. In this case, it enabled us to add outside-in experiences to Drupal 8.2 instead of having to wait for Drupal 9. The authoring experience improvements we made in Drupal 8 are well-received, but that doesn't mean we are done. It's exciting that we can move much faster on making Drupal easier to use.

  • LLVM 3.9 Is Set To Be Released

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TuxMachines: today's howtos

Friday 2nd of September 2016 11:32:03 AM

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TuxMachines: Leftovers: Ubuntu

Friday 2nd of September 2016 11:30:12 AM
  • Should You Upgrade To Ubuntu 16.04 From Ubuntu 14.04

    Ubuntu 16.04 has been out for about 4 months now and it is the latest long term support release which gurarantees support for 5 more years.

    Do you need to upgrade to Ubuntu 16.04 right now or should you wait a while? In this guide I am going to list reasons for and against upgrading to Ubuntu 16.04 and help you to decide when it is right for you.

  • Ubuntu Working On Improved Low Graphics Mode For Unity 7

    While Ubuntu developers continue work on preparing the Unity 8 desktop for rolling out across all form-factors, Unity 7 is still seeing some new improvements as their interim desktop solution.

  • 5 Things We Secretly Miss About Ubuntu

    Sure, it’s super stable, far more compatible, and less buggy than it was a few years back. The polish and professionalism mirrors Canonical’s own transition from scrappy startup to server-ruling stalwart.

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LXer: EFF asks universities not to sell to patent trolls

Friday 2nd of September 2016 09:20:55 AM
The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), an international non-profit digital rights group, is reaching out to universities and their communities to combat patent trolls.

TuxMachines: Games for GNU/Linux

Friday 2nd of September 2016 08:45:08 AM

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TuxMachines: Redis Misconfiguration and Ransom

Friday 2nd of September 2016 08:32:12 AM

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TuxMachines: Florida Man Arrested for Hacking Linux Kernel Organization

Friday 2nd of September 2016 08:28:58 AM

Donald Ryan Austin, 27, of El Portal, Florida, was charged yesterday with hacking servers belonging to the Linux Kernel Organization (kernel.org).

According to a four-count indictment, Austin gained access to server credentials used by an individual associated with the Linux Kernel Organization.

Austin used the credentials to access four kernel.org servers located in a Bay Area data center, modified server configurations and installed rootkits and other trojans.

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Reddit: I've been out of the GNU/Linux "game" for about 5 years and looking to get back in; what have I missed?

Friday 2nd of September 2016 08:26:10 AM

I was huge into Arch and Gentoo back in high school and a few years after. I loved customising every stupid thing about my system and making everything nerdily optimised and sleek.

I ended up switching to a more pre-built distro like Ubuntu or Fedora for a while before eventually just going back to Windows (I think I needed it for some software at the time).

Anyway, I'm looking to dive back into the world of GNU/Linux and do it with something engaging like Arch but I'm definitely open to suggestions if anyone has any that I should at least try!

And I'm wondering what I've missed. What's a little new or different? Anything exciting for someone who got intrigued when he saw that there's a Xorg competitor/replacement in the works?

submitted by /u/traskers
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LXer: KDE Arrives in Berlin, Elects Thomas Pfeiffer to the e.V. Board

Friday 2nd of September 2016 08:12:18 AM
Today KDE has been arriving in Berlin for Akademy, our annual meeting, which is year is part of the larger QtCon conference. This year we are teaming up with KDAB to gather together with the wider community of Qt developers for the first time, which is a major opportunity to share experiences between the open source and the commercial worlds.

TuxMachines: Red Hat still plans on being The OpenStack company

Friday 2nd of September 2016 07:31:48 AM

Other companies -- Canonical, SUSE, and Mirantis -- all plan on being OpenStack powers, but Red Hat shows it's determined to be number one with its latest OpenStack cloud release.

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More in Tux Machines

Networking and Security

  • FAQ: What's so special about 802.11ad Wi-Fi?
    Here are the broad strokes about 802.11ad, the wireless technology that’s just starting to hit the market.
  • 2.5 and 5 Gigabit Ethernet Now Official Standards
    In 2014, multiple groups started efforts to create new mid-tier Ethernet speeds with the NBASE-T Alliance starting in October 2014 and MGBASE-T Alliance getting started a few months later in December 2014. While those groups started out on different paths, the final 802.3bz standard represents a unified protocol that is interoperable across multiple vendors. The promise of 2.5 and 5 Gbps Ethernet is that they can work over existing Cat5 cabling, which to date has only been able to support 1 Gbps. Now with the 802.3bz standard, organizations do not need to rip and replace cabling to get Ethernet that is up to five times faster. "Now, the 1000BASE-T uplink from the wireless to wired network is no longer sufficient, and users are searching for ways to tap into higher data rates without having to overhaul the 70 billion meters of Cat5e / Cat6 wiring already sold," David Chalupsky, board of directors of the Ethernet Alliance and Intel principal engineer, said in a statement. "IEEE 802.3bz is an elegant solution that not only addresses the demand for faster access to rapidly rising data volumes, but also capitalizes on previous infrastructure investments, thereby extending their life and maximizing value."
  • A quick fix for stupid password reset questions
    It didn’t take 500 million hacked Yahoo accounts to make me hate, hate, hate password reset questions (otherwise known as knowledge-based authentication or KBA). It didn't help when I heard that password reset questions and answers -- which are often identical, required, and reused on other websites -- were compromised in that massive hack, too. Is there any security person or respected security guidance that likes them? They are so last century. What is your mother’s maiden name? What is your favorite color? What was your first pet’s name?
  • French hosting provider hit by DDoS close to 1TBps
    A hosting provider in France has been hit by a distributed denial of service attack that went close to one terabyte per second. Concurrent attacks against OVH clocked in at 990GBps. The attack vector is said to be the same Internet-of-Things botnet of 152,464 devices that brought down the website of security expert Brian Krebs. OVH chief technology officer Octave Klaba tweeted that the network was capable of attacks up to 1.5TBps.
  • Latest IoT DDoS Attack Dwarfs Krebs Takedown At Nearly 1Tbps Driven By 150K Devices
    If you thought that the massive DDoS attack earlier this month on Brian Krebs’ security blog was record-breaking, take a look at what just happened to France-based hosting provider OVH. OVH was the victim of a wide-scale DDoS attack that was carried via network of over 152,000 IoT devices. According to OVH founder and CTO Octave Klaba, the DDoS attack reached nearly 1 Tbps at its peak. Of those IoT devices participating in the DDoS attack, they were primarily comprised of CCTV cameras and DVRs. Many of these types devices' network settings are improperly configured, which leaves them ripe for the picking for hackers that would love to use them to carry our destructive attacks.

Android Leftovers

  • Goodbye QWERTY: BlackBerry stops making hardware
    BlackBerry CEO John Chen has been hinting at this move for almost a year now: today BlackBerry announced it will no longer design hardware. Say goodbye to all the crazy hardware QWERTY devices, ultra-wide phones, and unique slider designs. Speaking to investors, BlackBerry CEO John Chen described the move as a "pivot to software," saying, "The company plans to end all internal hardware development and will outsource that function to partners. This allows us to reduce capital requirements and enhance return on invested capital." The "Outsourcing to partners" plan is something we've already seen with the "BlackBerry" DTEK50, which was just a rebranded Alcatel Idol 4. Chen is now betting the future of the company on software, saying, "In Q2, we more than doubled our software revenue year over year and delivered the highest gross margin in the company's history. We also completed initial shipments of BlackBerry Radar, an end-to-end asset tracking system, and signed a strategic licensing agreement to drive global growth in our BBM consumer business." BlackBerry never effectively responded to the 2007 launch of the iPhone and the resulting transition to modern touchscreen smartphones. BlackBerry took swings with devices like the BlackBerry Storm in 2008, its first touchscreen phone; and the BlackBerry Z10 in 2013, the first BlackBerry phone with an OS designed for touch, but neither caught on. BlackBerry's first viable competitor to the iPhone didn't arrive until it finally switched to Android in 2015 with the BlackBerry Priv. It was the first decent BlackBerry phone in some time, but the high price and subpar hardware led to poor sales.
  • Oracle's 'Gamechanger' Evidence Really Just Evidence Of Oracle Lawyers Failing To Read
    Then on to the main show: Oracle's claim that Google hid the plans to make Android apps work on Chrome OS. Google had revealed to Oracle its "App Runtime for Chrome" (ARC) setup, and it was discussed by Oracle's experts, but at Google I/O, Google revealed new plans for apps to run in Chrome OS that were not using ARC, but rather a brand new setup, which Google internally referred to as ARC++. Oracle argued that Google only revealed to them ARC, but not ARC++ and that was super relevant to the fair use argument, because it showed that Android was replacing more than just the mobile device market for Java. But, here's Oracle's big problem: Google had actually revealed to Oracle the plans for ARC++. It appears that Oracle's lawyers just missed that fact. Ouch.
  • Understanding Android's balance between openness and security
    At the 2016 Structure Security conference, Google's Adrian Ludwig talked about the balance between keeping Android as open as possible, while also keeping it secure.
  • Google's Nougat Android update hits the sweet spot: Software 'isn't flashy, but still pretty handy'
    Nougat, Google's latest update of its Android smartphone software, isn't particularly flashy; you might not even notice what's different about it at first. But it offers a number of practical time-saving features, plus a few that could save money — and perhaps even your life. Nougat is starting to appear on phones, including new ones expected from Google next week.
  • How to change the home screen launcher on Android
  • Andromeda: Chrome OS and Android will merge
  • Sale of Kodi 'fully-loaded' streaming boxes faces legal test
  • Android boxes: Middlesbrough man to be first to be prosecuted for selling streaming kits

Endless OS 3.0 is out!

So our latest and greatest Endless OS is out with the new 3.0 version series! The shiny new things include the use of Flatpak to manage the applications; a new app center (GNOME Software); a new icon set; a new Windows installer that gives you the possibility of installing Endless OS in dual-boot; and many bug fixes. Read more

Expandable, outdoor IoT gateway runs Android on i.MX6

VIA’s “Artigo A830” IoT gateway runs Android on an i.MX6 DualLite SoC and offers HDMI, GbE, microSD, numerous serial and USB ports, plus -20 to 60° operation. As the name suggests, the VIA Technologies Artigo A830 Streetwise IoT Platform is designed for outdoor Internet of Things gateway applications. These are said to include smart lockers, vending machines, information kiosks, and signage devices that run “intensive multimedia shopping, entertainment, and navigation applications.” The outdoors focus is supported with an extended -20 to 60°C operating range, as well as surge and ESD protection for surviving challenges such as a nearby lightning strike. Read more