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Updated: 1 hour 52 min ago

Reddit: Ebooks for Linux Users

Wednesday 27th of August 2014 02:10:47 PM

LXer: Tiny COMs take Intel Atom SoCs into harsh apps

Wednesday 27th of August 2014 01:44:17 PM
Extreme Engineering Solutions announced two rugged Linux-ready modules based on Intel E3800 SoCs, including one built in the tiny COM Express Mini format. Extreme Engineering Solutions (“X-ES”) is rolling out two nearly identical computer-on-module products: the “XPedite8150? conforms to the tiniest (84 x 55mm) COM Express Mini form-factor, while the “XPedite8152? adopts a somewhat larger 109 x 55mm “COM Express Extended Mini” format. Both COM models are offered with a choice of Atom system-on-chips, including the E3845, E3827, E3826, E3825, or E3815. However, the E3845 is standard, says X-ES.

Reddit: Command Your Ubuntu Machine using Voice Commands

Wednesday 27th of August 2014 01:39:01 PM

Phoronix: 20-Way Radeon Comparison With Open-Source Graphics For Steam On Linux Gaming

Wednesday 27th of August 2014 01:30:00 PM
When it comes to Linux gamers wanting a discrete graphics card backed by open-source drivers, the only solution right now to truly recommend for those serious about performance and making use of the hardware is really AMD Radeon graphics. While Nouveau has been making much progress, until re-clocking and other issues are worked out the performance can be unbearably slow depending upon the particular graphics processor or run into other problems. (Of course, when talking about proprietary graphics drivers on Linux, the story is entirely different, or if considering integrated Intel HD Graphics.) For those pursuing a AMD Radeon GPU for their own Steam Box/Machine build and hope to use the open-source Gallium3D drivers, here's some Steam on Linux gaming benchmarks from almost two dozen different GPUs.

TuxMachines: Optimize your Linux rig for top-notch writing

Wednesday 27th of August 2014 12:53:22 PM

I'm a big fan of Scott Nesbitt's writing, which has a technological bent, but is usually more about working effectively, rather than how tools can make you effective, which is a key distinction. Scott's setup reflects his focus on production rather than tweaking. He has his work tools and everything else is pretty much white noise—which is why LXDE/Lubuntu probably makes a lot of sense for his workflow.

It's simple and it stays out of his way. Scott also gets bonus points for moving his family to Linux. That's a tough move, but given that his wife stole his ZaReason laptop, the conversion seems to have taken.

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TuxMachines: IBM meets demand for Linux with training resources

Wednesday 27th of August 2014 12:47:13 PM

IBM HAS REAFFIRMED its commitment to Linux with the announcement of an extension to Power Systems Linux.

Following on from the company's $1bn financial commitment to the Linux operating system last year, IBM will add Power Systems Linux to the Power Systems services already available for AIX and IBM iSeries servers at 54 IBM Innovation Centres and Client Centres. This will enable Linux systems to better use IBM's Power8 parallel processing and advanced virtualisation.

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LXer: VMware puts VDI in the woodchipper

Wednesday 27th of August 2014 12:47:06 PM
VMware has outlined a new way to do desktop virtualisation (VDI) that aims to greatly reduce the amount of storage required to deliver desktops from the data centre. Many current VDI arrangements require each virtual desktop to be stored as a discrete virtual disk. By the time organisations get to hundreds or thousands of such disks, that adds up to a hefty storage requirement and all sorts of network fun around 9:00 AM when everyone arrives at work and logs on. The cost and complexity of all that kit makes VDI too pricey for many and too hard for others.

TuxMachines: How Red Hat can catch the developer train

Wednesday 27th of August 2014 12:45:09 PM

Outside the operating system, according to AngelList data compiled by Leo Polovets, these developers go with MySQL, MongoDB, or PostgreSQL for their database; Chef or Puppet for configuration; and ElasticSearch or Solr for search. None of this technology is developed by Red Hat.

Yet all of this technology is what the next generation of developers is using to build modern applications.

Given that developers are the new kingmakers, Red Hat needs to get out in front of the developer freight train if it wants to remain relevant for the next 20 years, much less the next two.

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TuxMachines: Shortlist of open source software used at NASA lab

Wednesday 27th of August 2014 12:22:16 PM

The offer was too good to be true. Three whole weeks at the NASA Glenn Research Center and an invitation to come back. I could scarcely believe it when I read the email. I immediately forwarded it to my parents with an addition of around 200 exclamation points. They were all for it, so I responded to my contact, Herb Schilling, with a resounding “YES!”

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TuxMachines: Ten Years of GParted

Wednesday 27th of August 2014 12:17:46 PM

The GParted team is happy to announce the tenth anniversary of GParted.

The first public release of GParted was version 0.0.3 on August 26th, 2004. Over the past 10 years, much has happened. Following are some statistics:

Over 300 people have contributed to GParted
Many GNU/Linux distributions now include GParted
Translators have worked to make GParted available in over 50 different languages
GParted is used in over 220 countries around the world
There have been over 17 million downloads from Sourceforge alone

To mark the occasion, questions were posed, and following are responses shared by some key contributors.

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TuxMachines: LinuxCon Showcases Advances in Linux, Open Source

Wednesday 27th of August 2014 12:10:39 PM

The Linux Foundation hosted its LinuxCon North America conference from Aug. 20 to 22 in Chicago, providing attendees with insight into the latest and greatest advancement in the Linux and open-source worlds. The event kicked off with the Linux Foundation's executive director, Jim Zemlin, announcing a new Linux certification program. The two new designations are the Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS) and Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE). During his keynote address, Zemlin also provided insight into what the Linux Foundation does and what his role is within the Linux community. The highlight for many attendees at any LinuxCon event is the opportunity to see and hear Linux creator Linus Torvalds speak. At the 2014 event, Torvalds, speaking on a Linux kernel developer panel, declared that he is still interested in seeing the Linux desktop succeed. Looking beyond just Linux, the CEO of education platform edX explained why the future of education is open and how his company has fully embraced the open-source model. An open model of collaboration is also being embraced in the automotive industry by startup Local Motors. Jay Rogers, CEO of Local Motors, explained how his company is aiming to revolutionize the automotive industry with crowdsourcing techniques. In this slide show, eWEEK looks back on some of the highlights of the LinuxCon North America 2014 event.

More: Linux Energy Drink: Get Energized with this Recap of LinuxCon and CloudOpen North America

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Phoronix: Google Chrome 37 Brings Many Security Fixes

Wednesday 27th of August 2014 12:01:51 PM
Google released Chrome 37 as stable on Tuesday and with this update comes more fixes and other improvements...

TuxMachines: Mozilla Adding Granular App Permissions to Firefox OS

Wednesday 27th of August 2014 11:54:18 AM

Mozilla is set to add a feature to its mobile Firefox OS that will give users the ability to revoke any application’s permissions on a granular basis.

Firefox OS is the open source operating system that Mozilla built for smartphones. The software runs on a variety of devices from manufacturers such as Alcatel, ZTE and LG. The devices mainly are available outside of the United States, although there’s at least one Firefox OS phone sold in the U.S. The operating system is meant to be flexible and includes many of the security and privacy features that Mozilla has built into the Firefox browser over the years, namely support for Do Not Track.

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TuxMachines: 35 Great Android Apps for Road Warriors

Wednesday 27th of August 2014 11:51:17 AM

So you’re a road warrior – that means you need to move fast and seamlessly across vast distances totally hassle-free. Gotcha. Here are the Android apps you’ll need to make your travels as fast and trouble-free as a “Beam me up, Scotty” command. No, there’s no transporter yet, but these apps are definitely the next best thing. And yes, there are Android apps here to help you get work done while you’re on the move too!

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LXer: GIMP 2.8.14 Released

Wednesday 27th of August 2014 10:52:44 AM
Yesterday's 2.8.12 release had broken library versioning, so we had to roll out GIMP 2.8.14 today. The only change is the fixed libtool versioning. This is a bugfix release in the stable 2.8 series, no new features were added.

TuxMachines: Alpine 3.0.4 released

Wednesday 27th of August 2014 10:23:11 AM

The Alpine Linux project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of version 3.0.4 of its Alpine Linux operating system.

This is a bugfix release of the v3.0 musl based branch. This release is based on the 3.14.17 kernel which has some critical security fixes.

The alpine-xen image is fixed and should now have a working hvmloader again.

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Reddit: Enlightenment Developer Day 2014

Wednesday 27th of August 2014 10:03:14 AM

LXer: Convert from MP3 to WAV and WAV to MP3 using Linux Mint

Wednesday 27th of August 2014 09:55:33 AM
This is a quick guide showing how to convert from WAV to MP3 and vice versa using the command line and the Gnome Audio Converter (Gnac).

More in Tux Machines

Scrivener Writing Software has a Linux Version

In some ways, Scrivener is the very embodiment of anti-Linux, philosophically. Scrivener is a writing program, used by authors. In Linux, one strings together well developed and intensely tested tools on data streams to produce a result. So, to author a complex project, create files and edit them in a simple text editor, using some markdown. Keep the files organized in the file system and use file names carefully chosen to keep them in order in their respective directories. when it comes time to make project-wide modifications, use grep and sed to process all of the files at once or selected files. Eventually, run the files through LaTeX to produce beautiful output. Then, put the final product in a directory where people can find it on Gopher.

Gopher? Anyway …

On the other hand, emacs is the ultimate linux program. Emacs is a text editor that is so powerful and has so many community-contributed “modes” (like add-ins) that it can be used as a word processor, an email client, a calendar, a PIM, a web browser, an operating system, to make coffee, or to stop that table with the short leg from rocking back and forth. So, in this sense, a piece of software that does everything is also linux, philosophically.

And so, Scrivener, despite what I said above, is in a way the very embodiment of Linux, philosophically.

I’ve been using Scrivener on a Mac for some time now, and a while back I tried it on Linux. Scrivener for the Mac is a commercial product you must pay money for, though it is not expensive, but the Linux version, being highly experimental and probably unsafe, is free. But then again, this is Linux. We eat unsafe experimental free software for breakfast. So much that we usually skip lunch. Because we’re still fixing breakfast. As it were.

Details with Screen Shots Here

Anyway, here’s what Scrivener does. It does everything. The full blown Mac version has more features than the Linux version, but both are feature rich. To me, the most important things are: A document is organised in “scenes” which can be willy nilly moved around in relation to each other in a linear or hierarchical system. The documents are recursive, so a document can hold other documents, and the default is to have only the text in the lower level document as part of the final product (though this is entirely optional). A document can be defined as a “folder” which is really just a document that has a file folder icon representing it to make you feel like it is a folder.

Associated with the project, and with each separate document, is a note taking area. So, you can jot notes project-wide as you work, like “Don’t forget to write the chapter where everyone dies at the end,” or you can write notes on a given document like “Is this where I should use the joke about the slushy in the bathroom at Target?” Each scene also has a number of attributes such as a “label” and a “status” and keywords. I think keywords may not be implemented in the Linux version yet.

Typically a project has one major folder that has all the actual writing distributed among scenes in it, and one or more additional folders in which you put stuff that is not in the product you are working on, but could be, or was but you pulled it out, or that includes research material.

You can work on one scene at a time. Scenes have meta-data and document notes.

The scenes, folders, and everything are all held together with a binder typically displayed on the left side of the Scrivener application window, showing the hierarchy. A number of templates come with the program to create pre-organized binder paradigms, or you can just create one from scratch. You can change the icons on the folders/scenes to remind you of what they are. When a scene is active in the central editing window, you can display an “inspector” on the right side, showing the card (I’ll get to that later) on top the meta data, and the document or project notes. In the Mac version you can create additional meta-data categories.

An individual scene can be displayed in the editing window. Or, scenes can be shown as a collection of scenes in what is known as “Scrivenings mode.” Scrivenings mode is more or less standard word processing mode where all the text is simply there to scroll through, though scene titles may or may not be shown (optional). A lot of people love the corkboard option. I remember when PZ Myers discovered Scrivener he raved about it. The corkboard is a corkboard (as you may have guessed) with 3 x 5 inch virtual index cards, one per scene, that you can move around and organize as though that was going to help you get your thoughts together. The corkboard has the scene title and some notes on what the scene is, which is yet another form of meta-data. I like the corkboard mode, but really, I don’t think it is the most useful features. Come for the corkboard, stay for the binder and the document and project notes!

Community chest: Storage firms need to pay open-source debts

Linux and *BSD have completely changed the storage market. They are the core of so many storage products, allowing startups and established vendors alike to bring new products to the market more rapidly than previously possible. Almost every vendor I talk to these days has built their system on top of these and then there are the number of vendors who are using Samba implementations for their NAS functionality. Sometimes they move on from Samba but almost all version 1 NAS boxen are built on top of it. Read more

Black Lab SDK 1.8 released

QT Creator - for QT 5 Gambas 3 - Visual Basic for Linux Ubuntu Quickly - Quick and dirty development tool for python emacs and Xemacs - Advanced Text Editor Anjuta and Glade - C++ RAD development tool for GTK Netbeans - Java development environment GNAT-GPS - IDE for the following programming languages. Ada, C, JavaScript, Pascal and Python Idle - IDE for Python Scite - Text Editor Read more

Did Red Hat’s CTO Walk – Or Was He Pushed?

He went on to say that some within Red Hat speculate that tensions between Stevens and Paul Cormier, Red Hat’s president of products and technologies, might be responsible, although there doesn’t appear to have been any current argument between the two. Cormier will take over Stevens’ duties until a replacement is found. Vaughan-Nichols also said that others at Red Hat had opined that Stevens might’ve left because he’d risen as high as he could within the company and with no new advancement opportunities open to him, he’d decided to move on. If this was the case, why did he leave so abruptly? Stevens had been at Red Hat for nearly ten years. If he was leaving merely because “I’ve done all I can here and it’s time to seek my fortune elsewhere,” we’d expect him to work out some kind of notice and stay on the job long enough for Red Hat to find a suitable replacement. Turning in a resignation that’s effective immediately is not the ideal way to walk out the door for the last time. It smells of burning bridges. Read more