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Updated: 18 min 14 sec ago

LXer: Using the Myers-Briggs personality test for teams

Friday 29th of July 2016 09:59:11 AM
Writing about collaborative, peer-to-peer teamwork in The Open Organization, Jim Whitehurst stresses the importance of:read more

Reddit: Worth switching from Surface Pro 3 i5 4GB to a T520 i7(260EUR) for Software Engineering?

Friday 29th of July 2016 09:45:49 AM

Hi!

I am currently sporting a Surface Pro 3 i5 4GB, but now I want back to Linux because I recently got accepted into a Software Engineering programme for three years.

I have a good price at a T520 i7 8GB 500GB HDD, 260eur, and I wonder if it is worth the jump? My Surface is just too small screen size and 128gb won't go a long way, and having no Linux on it. (I know Surface Linux exists but dual booting is not worth it on the small SSD, solely booting Linux voids the warranty..)

And I have heard really great stuff about thinkpads running Linux - and I thought you guys would know beat about my question!

Is a T520 worth it and will it be better than my Surface? The T520 sports a i7-2620M 2,7 GHz with 8GB RAM and 500GB HDD with a 15.6 inch screen.

submitted by /u/DeniCevap
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TuxMachines: Mint 18 Xfce Imminent, Gmane.org Shutting Down

Friday 29th of July 2016 09:40:45 AM

Mint project lead Clement Lefebvre today said that Mint 18 Xfce is "almost ready" but KDE users will have to continue to wait. The second alpha in the Ubuntu 16.10 developmental cycle is available to crash testers as of today in Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE and Ubuntu Kylin flavors only. In other news, the Gmane mailing list archive site is shutting down as the founder has grown weary with the hassles as well as a prolonged DDOS attack. Finally today, Carla Schroder shared her Linux story.

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LXer: Facebook Open Sources 17-Camera Surround360 Rig with Ubuntu Stitching Software

Friday 29th of July 2016 09:02:00 AM
In April, Facebook announced it had built a “Surround360” 3D-360 video capture system, but that it did not plan to sell it. Instead, the social networking giant promised it would open source both the hardware and the Ubuntu Linux-based software used to stitch together images from the camera into stereoscopic 360 panoramas.

LXer: AMD R-Series hits the jackpot on casino gaming SBC

Friday 29th of July 2016 08:04:49 AM
Axiomtek’s “GMB135” casino gaming SBC offers quad- or dual-core AMD R-Series SoCs, up to 32GB DDR4, triple display support, 32 DIOs, and intrusion detection. The GMB135 follows Axiomtek Gaming’s GMB130 Mini-ITX board, which also targeted casino gaming applications. It similarly runs Linux 3.x or Windows 7/8.1 on an AMD R-Series SoC with AMD Radeon HD10000 […]

LXer: Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 Update to Rename the Libertine Scope to "Desktop Apps"

Friday 29th of July 2016 07:07:38 AM
Now that the Ubuntu Touch OTA-12 update has been successfully deployed to users' devices, it's time for Canonical's engineers behind the Ubuntu mobile OS to concentrate their efforts on the next milestone.

Reddit: Anyone still using lsyncd?

Friday 29th of July 2016 06:27:05 AM

I setup lsyncd a few years back to keep my laptop data sync'd to my server. Still using it and works awesome but took some effort to get working originally (though some of the learning curve was due to systemd).

With new open source projects every day, just wondering if people are still using lsyncd for new projects or if they're opting for other tools and why.

submitted by /u/bluonek
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LXer: Embedded Linux Conference Europe schedule on tap

Friday 29th of July 2016 06:10:27 AM
The schedule for the Oct. 11-13 ELC Europe and OpenIoT Summit in Berlin has been posted, with co-located events on Yocto, RTL, tracing, and OpenWrt. Last year, the Embedded Linux Conference Europe (ELCE) in Dublin was co-located with the European versions of LinuxCon and CloudOpen, but this year it comes a week later. LinuxCon Europe […]

LXer: Install Bludit on Ubuntu 16.04

Friday 29th of July 2016 05:13:16 AM
In this article, we will explain how to install Bludit on an Ubuntu 16.04 VPS with PHP-FPM and Nginx. Bludit is an open source, fast, simple, and extensible file-based content management system (CMS) application written in PHP. Bludit stores the data in a flat file (JSON format) so you don’t need to install or configure a database.

TuxMachines: today's leftovers

Friday 29th of July 2016 04:55:47 AM
  • Comic-Con and FOSS Comic Book Solutions

    After whetting his appetite at this year’s Comic-Con, our resident Linux newbie discovers free and open source apps for reading digital comics, as well as a treasure trove of available sources for free comics online.

  • Linux Kernel 3.12.62 LTS Improves SPARC Support, Updates the Networking Stack

    Linux kernel developer Jiri Slaby announced the release of the sixty-second maintenance update for the long-term supported Linux 3.12 kernel series, which will receive support until 2017 because of SUSE Enterprise Linux.

    Linux kernel 3.12.62 LTS is a modest update, and looking at the diff from the previous maintenance release, version 3.12.61, we can notice that it changes a total of 96 files, with 1213 insertions and 1053 deletions. Among the changes, we can notice lots of fixes for the SPARC hardware architecture, but there are various other improvements for the ARM, MIPS, PA-RISC, and x86 instruction set architectures.

  • ‘Anatine’ Is a Simple Desktop Twitter App for Linux

    Anatine describes itself as a 'pristine Twitter app for Linux', but is it anything more than a wrapper around the mobile website?

  • Skype for Linux Alpha 1.3 Released With Small Bug Fixes

    A small bug fix update to Skype for Linux alpha is now available, and fixes, among many changes, errant close to tray behaviour on the Cinnamon desktop.

  • On the killing of intltool

    Say thanks to Daiki Ueno for his work maintaining gettext and enhancing it to make change practical, and to Javier Jardon for pushing this within GNOME and working to remove intltool from important GNOME modules.

  • On discoverability

    I've discussed elsewhere that usability is about real people doing real tasks in a reasonable amount of time. Some researchers also refer to "learnability" and "memorability" to define usability—this is very similar to discoverability. Can you discover the features of the system just by poking at it? Is the user interface obvious enough that you can figure it out on your own?

  • This is Lubuntu 16.10’s New Default Wallpaper

    The default wallpaper of Lubuntu 16.10 — yes, that's Lubuntu, with an 'l' — has been unveiled — but will fans of the lightweight Ubuntu spin like it?

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TuxMachines: Red Hat and Fedora

Friday 29th of July 2016 04:51:26 AM

TuxMachines: Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Friday 29th of July 2016 04:49:56 AM
  • Apache Graduates Another Big Data Project to Top Level

    For the past year, we've taken note of the many projects that the Apache Software Foundation has been elevating to Top-Level Status. The organization incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, and has squarely turned its focus to Big Data and developer-focused tools in recent months. As Apache moves Big Data projects to Top-Level Status, they gain valuable community support.

    Only days ago, the foundation announced that Apache Kudu has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). Kudu is an open source columnar storage engine built for the Apache Hadoop ecosystem designed to enable flexible, high-performance analytic pipelines. And now, Apache Twill has graduated as well. Twill is an abstraction over Apache Hadoop YARN that reduces the complexity of developing distributed Hadoop applications, allowing developers to focus more on their application logic.

  • Spark 2.0 takes an all-in-one approach to big data

    Apache Spark, the in-memory processing system that's fast become a centerpiece of modern big data frameworks, has officially released its long-awaited version 2.0.

    Aside from some major usability and performance improvements, Spark 2.0's mission is to become a total solution for streaming and real-time data. This comes as a number of other projects -- including others from the Apache Foundation -- provide their own ways to boost real-time and in-memory processing.

  • Why Uber Engineering Switched from Postgres to MySQL

    The early architecture of Uber consisted of a monolithic backend application written in Python that used Postgres for data persistence. Since that time, the architecture of Uber has changed significantly, to a model of microservices and new data platforms. Specifically, in many of the cases where we previously used Postgres, we now use Schemaless, a novel database sharding layer built on top of MySQL. In this article, we’ll explore some of the drawbacks we found with Postgres and explain the decision to build Schemaless and other backend services on top of MySQL.

  • GNU Hyperbole 6.0.1 for Emacs 24.4 to 25 is released

    GNU Hyperbole (pronounced Ga-new Hi-per-bo-lee), or just Hyperbole, is an amazing programmable hypertextual information management system implemented as a GNU Emacs package. This is the first public release in 2016. Hyperbole has been greatly expanded and modernized for use with the latest Emacs 25 releases; it supports GNU Emacs 24.4 or above. It contains an extensive set of improvements that can greatly boost your day-to-day productivity with Emacs and your ability to manage information stored across many different machines on the internet. People who get used to Hyperbole find it helps them so much that they prefer never to use Emacs without it.

  • Belgium mulls reuse of banking mobile eID app

    The Belgium government wants to reuse ‘Belgian Mobile ID’ a smartphone app for electronic identification, developed by banks and telecom providers in the country. The eID app could be used for eGovernment services, and the federal IT service agency, Fedict, is working on the app’s integration.

  • Water resilience that flows: Open source technologies keep an eye on the water flow

    Communities around the world are familiar with the devastation brought on by floods and droughts. Scientists are concerned that, in light of global climate change, these events will only become more frequent and intense. Water variability, at its worst, can threaten the lives and well-beings of countless people. Sadly, humans cannot control the weather to protect themselves. But according to Silja Hund, a researcher at the University of British Columbia, communities can build resilience to water resource stress.

    Hund studies the occurrence and behavior of water. In particular, she studies rivers and streams. These have features (like water volume) that can change quickly. According to Hund, it is essential for communities to understand local water systems. Knowledge of water resources is helpful in developing effective water strategies. And one of the best ways to understand dynamic water bodies like rivers is to collect lots of data.

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TuxMachines: Development News

Friday 29th of July 2016 04:42:29 AM
  • JavaScript keeps its spot atop programming language rankings

    U.K.-based technology analyst firm RedMonk just released the latest version of its biannual rankings of programming languages, and once again JavaScript tops the list, followed by Java and PHP.

    Those are same three languages that topped RedMonk’s list in January. In fact, the entire top 10 remains the same as it was it was six months ago. Perhaps the biggest surprise in Redmonk’s list—compiling the “performance of programming languages relative to one another on GitHub and Stack Overflow”—is that there are so few surprises, at least in the top 10.

  • Plenty of fish in the C, IEEE finds in language popularity contest

    It's no surprise that C and Java share the top two spots in the IEEE Spectrum's latest Interactive Top Programming Languages survey, but R at number five? That's a surprise.

    This month's raking from TIOBE put Java at number one and C at number two, while the IEEE reverses those two, and the IEEE doesn't rank assembly as a top-ten language like TIOBE does.

    It's worth noting however that the IEEE's sources are extremely diverse: the index comprises search results from Google, Twitter, GitHub, StackOverflow, Reddit, Hacker News, CareerBuilder, Dice, and the institute's own eXplore Digital Library.

    Even then, there are some oddities in the 48 programming environments assessed: several commenters to the index have already remarked that “Arduino” shouldn't be considered a language, because code for the teeny breadboard is written in C or C++.

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TuxMachines: Security Leftovers

Friday 29th of July 2016 04:41:59 AM

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LXer: Howdy, Ubuntu on Windows! Ubuntu Commands Every Windows User Should Learn

Friday 29th of July 2016 04:16:05 AM
Some Windows desktop users will certainly be new to Bash and the new shell, Ubuntu on Windows. In Part 1, I introduced the topic, and in Part 2, I showed how to get started by installing Windows. In this part of our series, I’ll describe a handful of essential commands to help get started.

More in Tux Machines

Desktop News

  • Why Google plans to stop supporting your Chromebook after five years
    It’s worth noting that end-of-life doesn’t have to mean the end of useful hardware. If you have the know-how, you can install Linux on your Chromebook to extend its lifespan. Otherwise, users whose Chromebooks are still in fine working order just have to hope that end-of-life notification never comes.
  • EFF slams Microsoft's 'blatant disregard' for user privacy with Windows 10 [Ed: It's textbook definition of malware]
    THE ELECTRONIC FRONTIER FOUNDATION (EFF) has lashed out at Microsoft over the company's "blatant disregard" for user privacy with the pushy, data-slurping Windows 10 operating system. Following the launch of a petition in June, EFF has heard from thousands of pissed off people who are asked it to take action against Microsoft, and the privacy campaigners are doing just that. EFF is calling on Microsoft to listen to its users, of which more than 6,000 have signed the online petition, and incorporate their complaints into its operating system. "Otherwise, Microsoft may find that it has inadvertently discovered just how far it can push its users before they abandon a once-trusted company for a better, more privacy-protective solution," EFF's Amul Kalia said in a blog post. First on EFF’s radar is Microsoft’s backhanded tactics to get people to upgrade to Windows 10, which we here at the INQUIRER know about all too well.

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

  • Summary
    And so, GSoC has come to an end. In this post, I'm going to describe what I have done in the past 13 weeks.
  • The State of Wayland's GSoC Project For Improved Output Handling
    Google's annual Summer of Code 2016 (GSoC) is now officially over and we're starting to see the final reports issued by the many student developers involved. One of the reports worth mentioning is the Wayland project around getting Weston to start without any outputs and improved output handling. Student developer Armin Krezović was getting his feet wet with Wayland this summer and was led b
  • GSoC with Pitivi
  • GUADEC Experience
    In this blog post, I will be sharing my GUADEC experience which recently held from 11-Aug-2015 to 17-Aug-2016 in Karlsruhe, Germany. I actually got to see the faces behind IRC nicks, met most of developers and people from GNOME community and also most importantly, GUADEC helped me to meet my Google Summer of Code mentor Debarshi Ray in person which was just great.
  • GNOME Usability Test Results (Part 1)
    This is the first part of analysis for the usability test I recently conducted, with the purpose to uncover usability flaws of two GNOME applications: Photos and Calendar. For this part I am focusing on visualizing the results, demographics and talk more about the methodology I used for testing. We will take a closer look on how testers performed on every task given, using a heat map. Hopefully this will create a clear picture of the testing process and help to “get to know” the participants and understand them better!
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/33
    Week 33 brought us again 5 snapshots (0812, 0813, 0815, 0816 and 0817). There were some smaller and bigger updates, as usual.

Leftovers: Debian

  • Reproducible Builds: week 69 in Stretch cycle
    Daniel Stender blogged about python packaging and explained some caveats regarding reproducible builds.
  • Proposing speakers for DebConf17
    As you may already know, next DebConf will be held at Collège de Maisonneuve in Montreal from August 6 to August 12, 2017. We are already thinking about the conference schedule, and the content team is open to suggestions for invited speakers.
  • Google Summer of Code 2016 : Final Report
    This project aims to improve diffoscope tool and fix Debian packages which are unreproducible in Reproducible builds testing framework.