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Updated: 45 min 53 sec ago

Reddit: Nostalgia

Wednesday 1st of June 2016 11:40:50 PM

TuxMachines: today's leftovers

Wednesday 1st of June 2016 10:57:11 PM

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TuxMachines: Software and Games

Wednesday 1st of June 2016 10:56:30 PM
  • Ecotone Now available for Linux on Steam
  • Feral Interactive Confirms Life Is Strange is Coming to Mac, Linux
  • Open-source painting application Krita gets a version bump

    Boudewijn Rempt, the maintainer of open-source painting software Krita has announced the release of version 3.0.

    3.0 is a major version bump and with this release the project now has its own repository and wiki. The main focus of the developers for this release was code cleaning. With this release Krita has been ported to the latest Qt 5 and KDE Framework 5, thus keeping the codebase modern.

  • GNOME Calendar App Getting Major Year and Month View Improvements for GNOME 3.22

    The GNOME Calendar app is getting a lot of attention lately, especially now that it has been integrated by default into the Ubuntu Linux operating system, but also because the development cycle of the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment is ongoing.

    We reported a few days ago that the second snapshot, version 3.21.2, of the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment, due for release later this year, on September 21, 2016, was released to public beta testers and early adopters, bringing various improvements to its core applications and components.

  • Samba releases client for ChromeOS

    The Samba project, the standard Windows interoperability suite of programs for Linux and Unix, has released a client for ChromeOS.

    The client, Network File Share, is available for installation from the Chrome Web Store and can be used to access network files directly from the Files app on ChromeOS.

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TuxMachines: Security Leftovers

Wednesday 1st of June 2016 10:55:59 PM
  • Security advisories for Wednesday
  • How the Top 5 PC Makers Open Your Laptop to Hackers [iophk: "Windows again"]
  • Google plans to replace smartphone passwords with trust scores [iophk: "if you have to travel unexpectedly, you'll probably get locked out."]

    Goodbye, Password1. Goodbye, 12345. You’ve been hearing about it for years but now it might really be happening: the password is almost dead.

    At Google’s I/O developer conference, Daniel Kaufman, head of Google’s advanced technology projects, announced that the company plans to phase out password access to its Android mobile platform in favour of a trust score by 2017. This would be based on a suite of identifiers: what Wi-Fi network and Bluetooth devices you’re connected to and your location, along with biometrics, including your typing speed, voice and face.

    The phone’s sensors will harvest this data continuously to keep a running tally on how much it trusts that the user is you. A low score will suffice for opening a gaming app. But a banking app will require more trust.

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TuxMachines: Red Hat News

Wednesday 1st of June 2016 10:52:25 PM

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Reddit: Kdenlive Bugs & Glitches

Wednesday 1st of June 2016 09:48:07 PM

TuxMachines: Leftovers: Gaming

Wednesday 1st of June 2016 09:11:21 PM

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Reddit: Do any live distros come with wine already installed and ready to go?

Wednesday 1st of June 2016 09:01:48 PM

I tried ubuntu ultimate but it wanted to open a windows exe with term. I tried using the commands from the wine site but there was some sort of error, probably due to trying to install something onto a read-only live disc.

submitted by /u/bluejeans90210
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TuxMachines: Linux and Linux Foundation

Wednesday 1st of June 2016 08:37:44 PM

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TuxMachines: ZFS: Finding Its Way to a Linux Near You?

Wednesday 1st of June 2016 08:36:28 PM

It seems like only yesterday that I read Jeff Bonwick's blog entry "ZFS: The Last Word in Filesystems". It was Halloween of 2005 that ZFS was fully integrated into Sun Microsystem's Solaris, and the filesystem was very well received. For the readers not familiar with ZFS, it is a combined all-purpose filesystem and volume manager. It simplified data storage management while also offering the most advanced features of the time. Such technologies include drive pooling with software RAID support, file snapshots, in-line data compression, data deduplication, built-in data integrity, advanced caching (to DRAM and SSD), and more. Today, the ZFS trademark and technology is owned and maintained by the Oracle Corporation.

Also: Wayland 1.12 Planned For Release In September

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TuxMachines: Ubuntu Phone and Ubuntu Tablet

Wednesday 1st of June 2016 08:28:27 PM

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TuxMachines: Meizu Pro 5 is the first Ubuntu phone that’s also a desktop PC (thanks to OTA-11 update)

Wednesday 1st of June 2016 07:55:43 PM

The Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Edition smartphone features a Samsung Exynos 7420 octa-core processor, 3GB of RAM, 32GB of storage, and a 5.7 inch full HD AMOLED display. When it launched earlier this year, it was the most powerful smartphone to ship with Ubuntu’s smartphone-friendly operating system to date.

Now it’s also the first Ubuntu phone that you can also use as a desktop computer.

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Reddit: exFAT/FAT64

Wednesday 1st of June 2016 07:43:30 PM

I installed Linux Mint on an old HP laptop, and I installed the exfat package. I plugged in my USB drive and it worked perfectly.

My question is, did they reverse engineer exfat? Exfat it still proprietary and as far as I know MS didn't release the specifications (like it did with RDP). Why hasn't Microsoft sued anybody? Not that I want them to...

submitted by /u/DoofusCPA
[link] [comments]

LXer: Linux Lite 3 Is Now Available With A New Login Manager, Many GUI Improvements And Bug Fixes

Wednesday 1st of June 2016 07:42:35 PM
Linux Lite, a Ubuntu LTS based and lightweight Linux distribution is focused on Windows users who want to turn to Linux easily. The distribution has always been trying to make it so easy that any Windows user has no trouble performing regular tasks on Linux Lite. Linux Lite was improved a lot in 2 series and now there is starting of series 3 with many improvements.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more