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Updated: 34 min 55 sec ago

TuxMachines: today's leftovers

2 hours 37 sec ago
  • Microsoft Sued After Windows 10 Upgrade “Destroyed Users’ Computers”

    In the lawsuit documents (via The Reg), the plaintiffs explain that Microsoft did not “exercise reasonable care in designing, formulating, and manufacturing the Windows 10 upgrade,” becoming responsible for damages caused to users in the form of data loss and hardware issues.

  • WebTorrent Desktop: Instant Video Streaming App for Linux Desktop

    WebTorrent Desktop is a cross-platform open source torrent client with which you can instantly stream audio and video torrent files without waiting to completely download them.

    It features a beautiful and modern User Interface, streaming support for videos from Internet Archive, music from Creative Commons, and audiobooks from Librivox, and has the ability to talk to BitTorrent and WebTorrent peers while providing a seamless User Experience.

  • Humble Store has some noteworthy deals on this weekend
  • clr-boot-manager now available in Solus

    We’re happy to announce the rollout of clr-boot-manager in our stable repository. clr-boot-manager, from the Clear Linux Project For Intel Architecture, enables a more bulletproof update experience by handling the maintenance and garbage collection of kernels, as well as configuration of the bootloader itself (i.e. GRUB2 for Legacy Boot, goofiboot for UEFI boot on Solus). Furthermore, it enables us to retain older, known-working kernels, so in the event a kernel upgrade results in the inability to boot, you’ll still be able to roll back to the last good kernel.

  • Ubuntu vs Arch Linux

    Comparing Ubuntu to Arch Linux. Focus is entirely on the underlying system, as Arch don’t offer a specific interface to compare with Ubuntu’s Unity desktop.

  • Packaging Ishiiruka-Dolphin (GameCube/Wii Emulator)
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) To Kick Off Another Week Of Big Earnings Reports
  • Debian Project Leader elections 2017

    It's that time of year again for the Debian Project: the elections of its Project Leader!

    The Project Leader position is described in the Debian Constitution.

read more

TuxMachines: Canonical and Ubuntu

2 hours 6 min ago
  • RADV & ANV Vulkan Drivers Are One Command Away On Ubuntu 17.04

    Similar to Ubuntu 16.10, the Mesa Vulkan drivers are not present by default on new Ubuntu installations. But to get the packaged Vulkan drivers, simply sudo apt install mesa-vulkan-drivers. When running some tests on Ubuntu 17.04 this weekend, I was a bit surprised to see that Mesa's Intel ANV and Radeon RADV drivers aren't present by default -- since it's been one year since the Vulkan 1.0 debut and the ANV/RADV drivers have matured a lot during this time. There's also more and more software becoming available that can make use of Vulkan while personally wishing for more Linux desktops to push Vulkan. But it's easy to install the Vulkan drivers as mentioned. Similarly, vulkan-utils isn't installed by default.

  • Wishful Thinking Of Non-Free Software Makers

    Regardless of my personal problems with non-Free software, the world has largely accepted FLOSS to SAS’s chagrin. I guess Canonical should be glad except they barely mention “Linux” on their site. What’s with that? They are like some purveyors of non-Free software that talk about the benefits of their products without even mentioning what the software actually does as if that’s best kept secret…

  • 2017: Should Linux Benchmarking Still Be Mostly Done With Ubuntu?

    Every year or so it comes up how some users believe that at Phoronix we should be benchmarking with Antergos/Arch, Debian, or [insert here any other distribution] instead of mostly using Ubuntu for our Linux benchmarking. That discussion has come back up in recent days.

    In our forums and Twitter the past few days, that discussion seems to have come up by some users requesting I use a different Linux distribution than Ubuntu as the main test platform for all of our benchmarking. As I've said before, Ubuntu is used given it's the most popular when it comes to Linux desktop usage as well as significant usage of it on servers / workstations / cloud. But I have no tie to it beyond focusing upon using the Linux distribution that's used by the most folks for obtaining the maximum relevance to users, gamers, and enthusiasts reading said articles. And for allowing easy comparisons / out-of-the-box expectations. On my main production system I still use Fedora Workstation as my personal favorite and in the basement server room there are a variety of operating systems -- both BSDs and Linux and from Antergos to openSUSE and Debian.

read more

TuxMachines: Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android

2 hours 7 min ago

read more

TuxMachines: Leftovers: OSS

2 hours 8 min ago
  • SAP buys into blockchain, joins Hyperledger Project
  • foss-north speaker line-up

    I am extremely pleased to have confirmed the entire speaker line-up for foss north 2017. This will be a really good year!

  • Chromium/Chrome Browser Adds A glTF Parser

    Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. The GL Transmission Format, of course, being Khronos' "3D asset delivery format" for dealing with compressed scenes and assets by WebGL, OpenGL ES, and other APIs.

    There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web. Their glTF parser was added to Chromium Git on Friday.

  • Sex and Gor and open source

    A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert, founder of the popular open-source CMS Drupal, asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor and long-time member of the Drupal community, “to leave the Drupal project.” Why did he do this? He refuses to say. A huge furor has erupted in response — not least because the reason clearly has much to do with Garfield’s unconventional sex life.

    [...]

    I’ll unpack the first: open-source communities/projects are crucially important to many people’s careers and professional lives — cf “the cornerstone of my career” — so who they allow and deny membership to, and how their codes of conduct are constructed and followed, is highly consequential.

  • Hazelcast Releases 3.8 – The Fastest Open Source In-Memory Data Grid
  • SecureDrop and Alexandre Oliva are 2016 Free Software Awards winners
  • MRRF 17: Lulzbot and IC3D Release Line Of Open Source Filament

    Today at the Midwest RepRap Festival, Lulzbot and IC3D announced the creation of an Open Source filament.

    While the RepRap project is the best example we have for what can be done with Open Source hardware, the stuff that makes 3D printers work – filament, motors, and to some extent the electronics – are tied up in trade secrets and proprietary processes. As you would expect from most industrial processes, there is an art and a science to making filament and now these secrets will be revealed.

  • RApiDatetime 0.0.2

read more

TuxMachines: Security Leftovers

2 hours 12 min ago
  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find

    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.

  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series

    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL.

    [...]

    With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.

  • NextCloud, a security analysis

    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement.

    As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.

  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash

    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole

read more

LXer: openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

3 hours 8 min ago
I have been using openSUSE for a long time -- basically, for as long as there has been an openSUSE. I used the "stable" numbered releases at first, but that was a typical "point-release" distribution, which got major updates in complete new releases which were made every six months or so. I like to keep up with the latest Linux developments, so when the original (unofficial) Tumbleweed distribution came along, I gave it a try -- and I have never gone back.

Reddit: What is the correct way to store store multiple programs in your path?

3 hours 35 min ago

Hey all,

So for my work, I need to use multiple programs which I store in the /opt/ directory. Every time I install a program, I have been adding the path to that program to my own path, and now, my path is getting to be quite large. I'm thinking that it would more efficient to create a single directory containing links to all programs I need, and only add that directory to my path. However, I'm relatively new to Linux, and don't know if that is the correct way to deal with this issue. I don't want to pick up any bad habits related to file maintenance, so I'd like to know what the correct way to approach this problem is?

submitted by /u/MaskeAuf
[link] [comments]

Phoronix: Solus Integrates Clear Linux's clr-boot-manager

3 hours 48 min ago
The desktop-focused, performance-oriented Solus Linux distribution has pulled in another component from Clear Linux: clr-boot-manager. The clr-boot-manager is responsible for solid kernel and boot-loader management...

LXer: How to Install CachetHQ on an Ubuntu 16.04 VPS

5 hours 2 min ago
In this tutorial, we’ll show you how to install CachetHQ on an Ubuntu 16.04 VPS with MySQL and Apache2.

Reddit: Btrfs: backing up a file server with many subvolumes

5 hours 25 min ago

I have a Btrfs filesystem on a backup server. This filesystem has a directory to hold backups for filesystems from remote machines. In this directory is a subdirectory for each machine. Under each machine subdirectory is one directory for each filesystem (ex /boot, /home, etc) on that machine. In each filesystem subdirectory are incremental snapshot subvolumes for that filesystem. The scheme is something like this:

<top>/backup/<machine>/<filesystem>/<many snapshot subvolumes>

I'd like to try to back up (duplicate) the file server filesystem containing these snapshot subvolumes for each remote machine. The problem is that I don't think I can use send/receive to do this. "Btrfs send" requires "read-only" snapshots, and snapshots are not recursive as yet. I think there are too many subvolumes which change too often to make doing this without recursion practical.

Any thoughts would be most appreciated.

submitted by /u/oss542
[link] [comments]

Reddit: I have no idea what I'm doing but I'm trying to figure out dual boot

5 hours 38 min ago

I want to give Linux a try. So far my only experience with it is a raspberry pi / Retropie.

So I've installed a second hard drive on my pc. Unplugged the windows HD, and put Ubuntu on to the new one without issue. Plugged the windows HD back in and hit restart, go to bios to change boot order. It still boots to windows 10 automatically. So I unplug it again. Go back to Ubuntu, install grub/grub customizer. No difference. Then I try sudo boot repair. No difference. I go back to windows, turn off fast boot. Still no difference.

No matter what I try it goes to windows.

submitted by /u/kappakingtut
[link] [comments]

Phoronix: Getting Better Radeon Polaris Performance On Ubuntu 17.04 With Mesa 17.1, Linux 4.11

5 hours 54 min ago
While Ubuntu 17.04 is set to ship next month with Linux 4.10 and Mesa 17.0 as a big upgrade over the open-source graphics stack found in Ubuntu 16.10, if you switch over to using Mesa 17.1 and Linux 4.11 is the potential for even better performance. Here are some Radeon RX 470 tests in different combinations on Ubuntu 17.04...

Phoronix: Shader Variants Support For Etnaviv Gallium3D

6 hours 10 min ago
There is a new feature to talk about for Etnaviv Gallium3D, the open-source reverse-engineered driver designed for Vivante graphics cores...

LXer: FedEx paying five dollars to install Flash

6 hours 57 min ago
Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkholeFedEx is offering customers US$5 to enable Adobe Flash in their browsers.…

More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • SAP buys into blockchain, joins Hyperledger Project
  • foss-north speaker line-up
    I am extremely pleased to have confirmed the entire speaker line-up for foss north 2017. This will be a really good year!
  • Chromium/Chrome Browser Adds A glTF Parser
    Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. The GL Transmission Format, of course, being Khronos' "3D asset delivery format" for dealing with compressed scenes and assets by WebGL, OpenGL ES, and other APIs. There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web. Their glTF parser was added to Chromium Git on Friday.
  • Sex and Gor and open source
    A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert, founder of the popular open-source CMS Drupal, asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor and long-time member of the Drupal community, “to leave the Drupal project.” Why did he do this? He refuses to say. A huge furor has erupted in response — not least because the reason clearly has much to do with Garfield’s unconventional sex life. [...] I’ll unpack the first: open-source communities/projects are crucially important to many people’s careers and professional lives — cf “the cornerstone of my career” — so who they allow and deny membership to, and how their codes of conduct are constructed and followed, is highly consequential.
  • Hazelcast Releases 3.8 – The Fastest Open Source In-Memory Data Grid
  • SecureDrop and Alexandre Oliva are 2016 Free Software Awards winners
  • MRRF 17: Lulzbot and IC3D Release Line Of Open Source Filament
    Today at the Midwest RepRap Festival, Lulzbot and IC3D announced the creation of an Open Source filament. While the RepRap project is the best example we have for what can be done with Open Source hardware, the stuff that makes 3D printers work – filament, motors, and to some extent the electronics – are tied up in trade secrets and proprietary processes. As you would expect from most industrial processes, there is an art and a science to making filament and now these secrets will be revealed.
  • RApiDatetime 0.0.2

Security Leftovers

  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find
    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.
  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series
    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL. [...] With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.
  • NextCloud, a security analysis
    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement. As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.
  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash
    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole

GNOME Extensions Website Has A New Look

Every GNOME Shell user will visit the official GNOME Shell Extensions website at least once. And if those users do so this weekend they’ll notice a small difference as the GNOME Shell Extensions website is sporting a minor redesign. This online repo plays host to a stack of terrific add-ons that add additional features and tweak existing ones. Read more