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Linux / Open Source Online Resources
Updated: 5 hours 41 min ago

How to Get Size of Directory in Linux

Tuesday 21st of May 2019 01:50:18 PM

In this article, we focus on how you can check the size of Directory on Linux Systems. This we are going to achieve using the command line interface. The command used to retrieve the file sizes is the  du  command, short [...]

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How to Rename Files in Linux

Tuesday 14th of May 2019 09:09:54 AM

Renaming files in Linux is one of the easiest tasks that you can accomplish straight from the command line. There are quite a few ways you can achieve this and in this guide, I will take you through how you [...]

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How to Find/Change Ubuntu Default Root Password

Tuesday 7th of May 2019 01:30:34 PM

Before I explain how to change the default password, its good to know about "Root SuperUser" and "sudo user" in Linux. In any Linux, as also in any Ubuntu version, there is a SuperUser named root, the Windows equivalent of [...]

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Ansible Interview Questions & Answers for Devops

Tuesday 23rd of April 2019 04:50:53 PM

In this guide, we're going to look at Ansible Interview Questions & Answers for DevOps Engineers. This is intended to help you prepare for Ansible Devops Interview and also review your skills. Over the past one year, Ansible adoption has been massive. [...]

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How to Use Curl Command with Examples

Wednesday 17th of April 2019 05:49:14 PM

Back in the mid-1990’s a Swedish programmer named Daniel Stenberg started a project that eventually became what we know as curl today. curl is a command line tool to transfer data to or from a server, using any of the supported [...]

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How to Delete Files and Directories in Linux

Tuesday 9th of April 2019 06:32:30 PM

You may, in some cases, need to delete directories and files that you do not need to free up space on your hard drive. In this brief tutorial, you will learn how to delete files and directories in Linux. To [...]

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How to Read a Filename with Spaces in Linux

Tuesday 2nd of April 2019 04:52:03 PM

It's not very common in Linux to handle filename with spaces but sometimes files copied or mounted from windows would end up with spaces. While it is not recommended to have file names with spaces, let discuss how to manage filename [...]

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How to Install Terraform on CentOS 7/Ubuntu 18.04

Tuesday 26th of March 2019 12:05:57 AM

Terraform is a software which allows you to manage cloud infrastructure resources from code efficiently. You can use Terraform to build, change, and version infrastructure deployed on proprietary cloud providers or your own infrastructure on premises. It supports cloud service [...]

The post How to Install Terraform on CentOS 7/Ubuntu 18.04 appeared first on LinOxide.

How to Extract tar xz File in Linux

Tuesday 19th of March 2019 11:49:39 PM

In this brief guide, we will look at how you can compress and extract tar xz tarball files/directories with a .tar.xz file extension in Linux. The xz format is a single-file compression format that is based on the LZMA2 algorithm. It [...]

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How to List Services in Linux

Tuesday 12th of March 2019 12:19:49 PM

In this article, I will show you how to list all running services on Linux. We will also check how to check the status of a service on a systemd system. Let's learn different commands used to list services on Centos/RHEL 7.x. [...]

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How to Time a Command in Linux

Tuesday 5th of March 2019 11:39:36 PM

If you want to be a good Linux administrator, therefore you should know time command. It is used to determine how long a given command takes to run. It is useful for testing the performance of your scripts and commands (ie [...]

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What are the Different Text Editors for Ubuntu

Tuesday 26th of February 2019 12:14:53 PM

A myriad of text editors are available for Ubuntu, and if you use them well, you may as well join the expert group of Linux code developers. In the article, we will look at some of the best text editors [...]

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How to Install pgAdmin4 on Ubuntu

Wednesday 20th of February 2019 02:08:46 AM

pgAdmin4 is a feature-rich, cross-platform, web-based interface that allows you to administer and manage PostgreSQL database instances in a web browser.  In this guide, you will learn how to install pgAdmin4 on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. Read Also: How to Install Ubuntu 18.04 [...]

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How to Configure and Install Webmin on Ubuntu

Thursday 14th of February 2019 10:35:07 AM

Webmin is a web-based control panel that is used for administration of Linux systems. It is written in Perl and helps systems administrators to have an overview of their server performance at a glance. Webmin eliminates the hassle of manually [...]

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Learn Methods to Install and Use TensorFlow in Ubuntu

Wednesday 6th of February 2019 11:12:12 AM

TensorFlow is an open-source deep learning software system built by Google to train neural networks.TensorFlow can perform image recognition, human language audio recognition and solving partial differential equations. We will install TensorFlow and all of the packages required to use [...]

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Set Time/Date/Timezone in Ubuntu Linux - A Complete Guide

Tuesday 5th of February 2019 08:15:27 AM

Time is an important aspect in Linux systems especially in critical services such as cron jobs. Having the correct time on the server ensures that the server operates in a healthy environment that consists of distributed systems and maintains accuracy [...]

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Red Hat's Wayland Agenda and AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel

  • Hans de Goede: Wayland itches summary
    1. Middle click on title / header bar to lower the Window does not work for native apps. Multiple people have reported this issue to me. A similar issue was fixed for not being able to raise Windows. It should be easy to apply a similar fix for the lowering problem. There are bugs open for this here, here and here. 2. Running graphical apps via sudo or pxexec does not work. There are numerous examples of apps breaking because of this, such as lshw-gui and usbivew. At least for X11 apps this is not that hard to fix. But sofar this has deliberately not been fixed. The reasoning behind this is described in this bug. I agree with the reasoning behind this, but I think it is not pragmatic to immediately disallow all GUI apps to connect when run as root starting today.
  • Hans de Goede: Better support for running games under Wayland (with GNOME3/mutter as compositor)
    First of all I do not want people to get their hopes up about $subject of this blogpost. Improving gaming support is a subjects which holds my personal interest and it is an issue I plan to spend time on trying to improve. But this will take a lot of time (think months for simple things, years for more complex things).
  • AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel
    Being past the Linux 5.2 kernel merge window, AMD's open-source Linux graphics driver developers have already begun queuing changes anticipated for Linux 5.3 via a work-in-progress tree. Given the short time that this 5.3 WIP tree has been around, there isn't too much exciting about the changes -- yet. But surely over the weeks ahead it will get interesting. Making things particularly interesting is that we are expecting initial Navi support to make it for Linux 5.3... In recent weeks AMD began pushing AMDGPU LLVM compiler back-end changes for GFX10/Navi and we expect the AMDGPU DRM kernel driver enablement to come for Linux 5.3. Linux 5.3 will already be arriving after the rumored release of the first Navi graphics cards so having to wait past 5.3 for mainline support would already be tragic. But given the recent LLVM activity, we expect AMD to push out the Navi kernel driver changes soon. For that likely massive patch-set to be reviewed in time, the Navi patches would need to make their debut within the next few weeks.

today's howtos and programming

Fedora 30 Workstation review - Smarter, faster and buggier

Fedora 30 is definitely one of the more interesting releases of this family in a long-time. It brings significant changes, including solid improvements in the desktop performance and responsiveness. Over the years, Fedora went from no proprietary stuff whatsoever to slowly acknowledging the modern needs of computing, so now it gives you MP3 codecs and you can install graphics drivers and such. Reasonable looks, plus good functionality across the board. However, there were tons of issues, too. Printing to Samba, video screenshot bug, installer cropped-image slides, package management complications, mouse cursor lag, oopses, average battery life, and inadequate usability out of the box. You need to change the defaults to have a desktop that can be used in a quick, efficient way without remembering a dozen nerdy keyboard shortcuts. All in all, I like the freshness. In general, it would seem the Linux desktop is seeing a cautious revival, and Fedora's definitely a happy player. But there are too many rough edges. Well, we got performance tweaks after so many years, and codecs, we might get window buttons and desktop icons one day back, too. Something like 6/10, and definitely worth exploring. I am happy enough to do two more tests. I will run an in-vivo upgrade on the F29 instance on this same box, and then also test the distro on an old Nvidia-powered laptop, which will showcase both the support for proprietary graphics (didn't work the last time) and performance improvements, if they scale for old hardware, too. That's all for now. Read more

Events: Automotive at LF, Linux Clusters Institute, Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC)

  • Automotive Linux Summit and Open Source Summit Japan Keynote Speakers and Schedule Announced
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source has announced the speaker line up for Open Source Summit Japan and Automotive Linux Summit. One registration provides access to all content at both events, which will be held July 17-19 at the Toranomon Hills Forum in Tokyo. Open Source Summit Japan (OSSJ) and Automotive Linux Summit (ALS) will bring together top talent from companies on the leading edge of innovation including Toyota Motor Corporation, Uber, Intel, Sony, Google, Microsoft and more. Talks will cover a range of topics, with ALS talks on everything from infrastructure and hardware to compliance and security; and OSSJ sessions on AI, Linux systems, cloud infrastructure, cloud native applications, open networking, edge computing, safety and security and open source best practices.
  • Register Now for the 2019 Introductory Linux Clusters Institute Workshop
    Registration is now open for the 2019 Linux Clusters Institute (LCI) Introductory Workshop,which will be held August 19-23, 2019 at the Rutgers University Inn & Conference Center in New Brunswick, NJ. This workshop will cover the fundamentals of setting up and administering a high-performance computing (HPC) cluster and will be led by leading HPC experts.
  • Additional early bird slots available for LPC 2019
    The Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) registration web site has been showing “sold out” recently because the cap on early bird registrations was reached. We are happy to report that we have reviewed the registration numbers for this year’s conference and were able to open more early bird registration slots. Beyond that, regular registration will open July 1st. Please note that speakers and microconference runners get free passes to LPC, as do some microconference presenters, so that may be another way to attend the conference. Time is running out for new refereed-track and microconference proposals, so visit the CFP page soon. Topics for accepted microconferences are welcome as well.