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Updated: 2 hours 10 min ago

Debian Joins KDE's Advisory Board

Thursday 12th of July 2018 12:00:00 AM
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The Debian community meets at Debconf 6 in Mexico. Photo by Joey Hess, licensed under CC By 4.0.

Since the KDE Advisory Board was created in 2016, we have been encouraging more and more organizations to join it, either as patrons or as non-profit partner organizations. With Ubuntu (via Canonical) and openSUSE (via SUSE) we already had two popular Linux distributions represented in the Advisory board. They are now joined by one of the biggest and oldest purely community-driven distributions: Debian.

KDE has a long-standing and friendly relationship with Debian, and we are happy to formalize it now. Having Debian on our Advisory Board will allow us to learn from them, share our experience with them, and deepen our collaboration even further.

As is tradition, we will now hand over the stage to the Debian Project Leader, Chris Lamb, who will tell you a bit about Debian and why he is happy to accept our invitation to the Advisory Board:


Chris Lamb.Debian is a stable, free and popular computer operating system trusted by millions of people across the globe, from solo backpackers, to astronauts on the International Space Station, and from small companies, to huge organisations.

Founded in 1993, Debian has since grown into a volunteer organisation of over 2,000 developers from more than 70 countries worldwide collaborating every day via the Internet.

The KDE Plasma desktop environment is fully-supported within Debian and thus the Debian Project is extremely excited to be formally recognising the relationship between itself and KDE, especially how that will greatly increase and facilitate our communication and collaboration.

Kdenlive: "Test our beta, test the future"

Thursday 5th of July 2018 06:40:59 AM

Kdenlive version 18.08 beta.

The Kdenlive project is calling on their users to test a refactored version of their full-featured and Free Software video-editing application.

Apart from re-writing a lot of the internals to clean up the code and make Kdenlive more efficient and easier to stabilize, this beta adds a bunch of new and interesting features. For example, the video and audio from clips are now automatically separated when dropped in the timeline, the slow motion effect now works and insert/lift/overwrite should also work reliably. Another thing you can do is install new keyboard layouts with one click. This means that, if you are coming from another video-editing software and relied on its shortcuts, you can still be equally productive with Kdenlive. For a full list of the new features in Kdenlive 18.08 Beta 17, take a look at the article on the projects site.

You can also be part of improving Kdenlive: Head over to Kdenlive's download page, download the Appimage, make it executable, run it and try editing some of your projects. Make a note of what doesn't work or misbehaves and send in a bug report.

Hey presto! You just helped make Kdenlive better!

A word of warning: Kdenlive version 18.08 beta 17, as its name implies, is beta software. It is not stable and some features will not work. Do not use this as your main production video-editing software. Also do not overwrite any important project files with files produced with the beta version of Kdenlive, since compatibility with older versions of Kdenlive is a known issue.

You can download and start using the latest stable version of Kdenlive from here.

The KDE e.V. Community Report for 2017 is now available

Thursday 28th of June 2018 12:00:00 AM

KDE e.V. board at their autumn sprint.

If there is one document you want to read to discover what KDE has been up to and where we are right now, this is the one.

KDE's yearly report gives a comprehensive overview of all that has happened during 2017. It covers the progress we have made with KDE's Plasma desktop environment; Plasma Mobile (KDE's graphical environment for mobile devices); and applications the community creates to stimulate your productivity, creativity, education, and fun.

The report also looks at KDE's activities during 2017, giving details on the results from community sprints, conferences, and external events the KDE community has participated in worldwide. It also covers what is probably the most important community milestone of 2017: defining and agreeing on what are the most important global goals, goals that will direct the efforts of KDE community members for years to come.

You can also find out about the inner workings of KDE e.V., the foundation that legally represents the community. Check KDE's financial status and read up about the KDE e.V. board members, the different working groups, the Advisory Board, and how they all work together to keep KDE moving forward.

Read the full report here.

More in Tux Machines

Wine and Games for GNU/Linux

  • Wine 3.13 is out as well as DXVK 0.63 for D3D11 with Vulkan
    First of all the latest Wine development release is out with Wine 3.13 and on top of that DXVK for Vulkan-based D3D11 in Wine also release version 0.63.
  • Feral's GameMode 1.2 Released For Optimizing Linux Gaming
    For what just started out as a tool to ensure you are using the "performance" frequency scaling governor when running Linux games, Feral's open-source GameMode system tool has slowly been picking up some extra functionality. Out this weekend is Feral GameMode 1.2 as the newest release. GameMode 1.2 adds configuration options about the default and desired governors, now supports soft real-time scheduling on kernels with SCHED_ISO support and will then use renice to boost games to a higher priority, the GameMode service is now D-Bus activated than needing to be explicitly enabled by systemd, and the GameMode libraries are now properly versioned.
  • Stardew Valley multiplayer just got a PC release date
    Since the moment Stardew Valley launched back in 2016, multiplayer has been one of the most anticipated additions to the games. After a period of beta testing, it’s nearly ready to roll out on PC, Mac, and Linux. While it probably isn’t going to look a lot different from the beta that’s currently available, this is exciting news for more reasons than one.
  • Multiplayer is coming to ‘Stardew Valley’ on PC, Mac and Linux
    According to a tweet from Eric Barone (@ConcernedApe), the sole developer behind Stardew Valley, the feature is coming to the lighthearted farming game on August 1st. Along with the release date, the game’s developer also released a new trailer for the feature (see it above).
  • 'Stardew Valley' multiplayer arrives on PC, Mac and Linux August 1st

Android Leftovers

Jonathan Dieter: Small file performance on distributed filesystems - Round 2

Last year, I ran some benchmarks on the GlusterFS, CephFS and LizardFS distributed filesystems, with some interesting results. I had a request to redo the test after a LizardFS RC was released with a FUSE3 client, since it is supposed to give better small file performance. I did have a request last time to include RozoFS, but, after a brief glance at the documentation, it looks like it requires a minimum of four servers, and I only had three available. I also looked at OrangeFS (originally PVFS2), but it doesn’t seem to provide replication, and, in preliminary testing, it was over ten times slower than the alternatives. NFS was tested and its results are included as a baseline. I once again used compilebench, which was designed to emulate real-life disk usage by creating a kernel tree, reading all the files in the tree, simulating a compile of the tree, running make clean, and finally deleting the tree. The test was much the same as last time, but with one important difference. Last time, the clients were running on the same machines that were running the servers. LizardFS benefited hugely from this as it has a “prefer local chunkserver” feature that will skip the network completely if there’s a copy on the local server. This time around, the clients were run on completely separate machines from the servers, which removed that advantage for LizardFS, but which I believe is a better reflection on how distributed filesystems are generally used. I would like to quickly note that there was very little speed difference between LizardFS’s FUSE2 and FUSE3 clients. The numbers included are from the FUSE3 client, but they only differed by a few percentage points from the FUSE2 client. Read more

GNOME 3.30 Desktop Environment to Enter Beta on August 1, GNOME 3.29.4 Is Out

With a two-day delay, the GNOME Project through Javier Jardón announced today the release of the fourth and last development snapshot of the GNOME 3.30 desktop environment before it enters beta testing next month, GNOME 3.29.4, which continues to add improvements to various of GNOME's core components and applications. However, due to the summer vacation and the GUADEC conference, GNOME 3.29.4 isn't a major snapshot as many would have expected. It only adds some minor changes and bug fixes to a handful of components, including GNOME Shell, Mutter, Evolution, GNOME Photos, GNOME Builder, GNOME Online Accounts, Polari, Bijiben, Evince, Epiphany, Baobab, GNOME Control Center, and File Roller. Read more Also: GNOME 3.29.4 Released As Another Step Towards GNOME 3.30