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Updated: 2 hours 17 min ago

Launching the European AI Fund

Thursday 24th of September 2020 04:35:08 AM
Right now, we’re in the early stages of the next phase of computing: AI. First we had the desktop. Then the internet. And smartphones. Increasingly, we’re living in a world …

Lenovo to roll out Ubuntu Linux 20.04 LTS across nearly 30 ThinkPads, ThinkStations

Thursday 24th of September 2020 03:20:48 AM
First, Fedora, and now, Ubuntu Linux. Lenovo is getting serious about the Linux desktop, with support for almost 30 ThinkPads and ThinkStations.

Intel's 10nm Elkhart Lake Atom chips feature Cortex-M7 and triple 4K

Thursday 24th of September 2020 02:06:28 AM
Intel unveiled a dozen 10nm “Elkhart Lake” Atom x6000E, Pentium, and Celeron SoCs at up to 3.0GHz Turbo with 4.5W to 12W TDPs and a Cortex-M7. The SoCs support 64GB RAM, triple 4K displays, 3x 2.5GbE with TSN, and OOB and safety features. At the Intel Industrial Summit 2020, Intel announced a new generation of […]

Strftime Python

Thursday 24th of September 2020 12:52:07 AM
Check out how to use Datetime Strftime method in Python to convert Datetime object to date string.

Lenovo Launches ThinkPad and ThinkStation PCs with Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

Wednesday 23rd of September 2020 11:37:47 PM
Lenovo and Canonical launched today personal computers from the ThinkPad and ThinkStation family that come preinstalled with the LTS (Long Term Support) version of the Ubuntu Linux operating system.

Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs go open source

Wednesday 23rd of September 2020 10:23:27 PM
Frictional Games have announced that they've now open source the game engine behind Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs as open source under the GPL.

Linux sysadmins: Understand ncat's power to avoid accidental security risks

Wednesday 23rd of September 2020 09:09:07 PM
The ncat command is a sysadmin's Swiss Army knife, but be careful to ensure you're using it safely.

How to Install RavenDB NoSQL database on Ubuntu 20.04

Wednesday 23rd of September 2020 07:54:46 PM
RavenDB is a free and open-source document-oriented NoSQL database that supports multiple databases, sharding, or partitioning the data across multiple servers. In this tutorial, we will learn how to install RavenDB on Ubuntu 20.04 server.

Apostrophe – distraction free Markdown editor

Wednesday 23rd of September 2020 06:40:26 PM
Apostrophe is a distraction free Markdown editor. It uses pandoc as the backend for Markdown parsing and offers a very clean and sleek user interface.

Run Linux apps on your Chromebook

Wednesday 23rd of September 2020 05:26:06 PM
Chromebooks have been a game-changer for PreK-12 school systems, enabling them to purchase low-cost laptop computers for students, teachers, and administrators to use. While Chromebooks have always been powered by a Linux-based operating system (Chrome OS), until recently, there was no way to run most Linux apps on one.read more

Create transparency in your game graphics with GIMP

Wednesday 23rd of September 2020 04:11:46 PM
Whether you're programming a game or an app with Python or Lua, you're probably using PNG graphics for your game assets. An advantage of the PNG format, which is not available in a JPEG, is the ability to store an alpha channel. Alpha is, essentially, the "color" of invisibility or transparency. Alpha is the part of an image you don't see.read more

Transfer Files And Folders Between Computers With Croc

Wednesday 23rd of September 2020 02:57:25 PM
Croc is a command line utility that allows you to easily, quickly and securely transfer files and folders between Computers in Linux.

5 ways to harden a new system with Ansible

Wednesday 23rd of September 2020 01:43:05 PM
Use Ansible to harden newly-deployed servers for consistent configurations with security in mind.

How to Install Mautic Marketing Automation Tool on Ubuntu 20.04

Wednesday 23rd of September 2020 12:28:45 PM
Mautic is an open source self-hosted marketing automation tool for everyone. You can use it to grow up your business, monitor your website, create landing pages, create campaign for your business, manage contacts, and even send marketing emails.

Install and Configure Graylog Monitoring Server Ubuntu 20.04

Wednesday 23rd of September 2020 11:14:25 AM
Graylog is a free and open-source log management software tool that can be used to monitor log of the network systems from the central server. It uses Elasticsearch to store logs data and provide search capabilities, and MongoDB for storing meta information.

Microsoft Edge comes to Linux in October as a preview

Wednesday 23rd of September 2020 10:00:04 AM
That's right, no need to wipe your glasses as that's a real headline here. Microsoft are bringing their Microsoft Edge browser to Linux in October.

Linux on Lenovo, jdk transition to Git, and more industry trends

Wednesday 23rd of September 2020 08:45:44 AM
As part of my role as a principal communication strategist at an enterprise software company with an open source development model, I publish a regular update about open source community, market, and industry trends. Here are some of my and their favorite articles from that update.

How to Install and Use FFmpeg on Ubuntu 20.04

Wednesday 23rd of September 2020 07:31:24 AM
FFmpeg is a free and open-source collection of tools for handling multimedia files. It contains a set of shared audio and video libraries such as libavcodec, libavformat, and libavutil. With FFmpeg, you can convert between various video and audio formats, set sample rates, capture streaming audio/video, and resize videos. This article describes how to install FFmpeg on Ubuntu 20.04.

OnLogic's Ubuntu-ready AMD servers include compact industrial edge model

Wednesday 23rd of September 2020 06:17:03 AM
OnLogic has launched a line of AMD servers, including two with 2nd Gen Epyc and three with Ryzen 3000, including a $1,547 and up Compact Industrial AMD Ryzen Edge Server. Meanwhile, AMD launched some 15W mobile Ryzen C-series chips. OnLogic and AMD, which last year teamed up on promoting OnLogic mini-PCs based on AMD’s Ryzen […]

Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 Released with Support for Sony Xperia X and OnePlus 3/3T

Wednesday 23rd of September 2020 05:02:43 AM
After several delays, the UBports Foundation announced the release of the Ubuntu Touch OTA-13 software update for Ubuntu Phone devices, a major update that brings support for new devices and various other improvements.

More in Tux Machines

LWN on Linux and Linux Foundation Bits

  • Modernizing the tasklet API

    Tasklets offer a deferred-execution method in the Linux kernel; they have been available since the 2.3 development series. They allow interrupt handlers to schedule further work to be executed as soon as possible after the handler itself. The tasklet API has its shortcomings, but it has stayed in place while other deferred-execution methods, including workqueues, have been introduced. Recently, Kees Cook posted a security-inspired patch set (also including work from Romain Perier) to improve the tasklet API. This change is uncontroversial, but it provoked a discussion that might lead to the removal of the tasklet API in the (not so distant) future. The need for tasklets and other deferred execution mechanisms comes from the way the kernel handles interrupts. An interrupt is (usually) caused by some hardware event; when it happens, the execution of the current task is suspended and the interrupt handler takes the CPU. Before the introduction of threaded interrupts, the interrupt handler had to perform the minimum necessary operations (like accessing the hardware registers to silence the interrupt) and then call an appropriate deferred-work mechanism to take care of just about everything else that needed to be done. Threaded interrupts, yet another import from the realtime preemption work, move the handler to a kernel thread that is scheduled in the usual way; this feature was merged for the 2.6.30 kernel, by which time tasklets were well established. An interrupt handler will schedule a tasklet when there is some work to be done at a later time. The kernel then runs the tasklet when possible, typically when the interrupt handler finishes, or the task returns to the user space. The tasklet callback runs in atomic context, inside a software interrupt, meaning that it cannot sleep or access user-space data, so not all work can be done in a tasklet handler. Also, the kernel only allows one instance of any given tasklet to be running at any given time; multiple different tasklet callbacks can run in parallel. Those limitations of tasklets are not present in more recent deferred work mechanisms like workqueues. But still, the current kernel contains more than a hundred users of tasklets. Cook's patch set changes the parameter type for the tasklet's callback. In current kernels, they take an unsigned long value that is specified when the tasklet is initialized. This is different from other kernel mechanisms with callbacks; the preferred way in current kernels is to use a pointer to a type-specific structure. The change Cook proposes goes in that direction by passing the tasklet context (struct tasklet_struct) to the callback. The goal behind this work is to avoid a number of problems, including a need to cast from the unsigned int to a different type (without proper type checking) in the callback. The change allows the removal of the (now) redundant data field from the tasklet structure. Finally, this change mitigates the possible buffer overflow attacks that could overwrite the callback pointer and the data field. This is likely one of the primary objectives, as the work was first posted (in 2019) on the kernel-hardening mailing list.

  • Android kernel notes from LPC 2020

    Todd Kjos started things off by introducing the Android Generic Kernel Image (GKI) effort, which is aimed at reducing Android's kernel-fragmentation problem in general. It is the next step for the Android Common Kernel, which is based on the mainline long-term support (LTS) releases with a number of patches added on top. These patches vary from Android-specific, out-of-tree features to fixes cherry-picked from mainline releases. The end result is that the Android Common Kernel diverges somewhat from the LTS releases on which it is based. From there, things get worse. Vendors pick up this kernel and apply their own changes — often significant, core-kernel changes — to create a vendor kernel. The original-equipment manufacturers begin with that kernel when creating a device based on the vendor's chips, but then add changes of their own to create the OEM kernel that is shipped with a device to the consumer. The end result of all this patching is that every device has its own kernel, meaning that there are thousands of different "Android" kernels in use. There are a lot of costs to this arrangement, Kjos said. Fragmentation makes it harder to ensure that all devices are running current kernels — or even that they get security updates. New platform releases require a new kernel, which raises the cost of upgrading an existing device to a new Android version. Fixes applied by vendors and OEMs often do not make it back into the mainline, making things worse for everybody. The Android developers would like to fix this fragmentation problem; the path toward that goal involves providing a single generic kernel in binary form (the GKI) that all devices would use. Any vendor-specific or device-specific code that is not in the mainline kernel will need to be shipped in the form of kernel modules to be loaded into the GKI. That means that Android is explicitly encouraging vendor modules, Kjos said; the result is a cleaner kernel without the sorts of core-kernel modifications that ship on many devices now. This policy has already resulted in more vendors actively working to upstream their code. That code often does not take the form that mainline developers would like to see; some of it is just patches exporting symbols. That has created some tension in the development community, he said.

  • Vibrant Networking, Edge Open Source Development On Full Display at Open Networking & Edge Summit

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today marked significant progress in the open networking and edge spaces. In advance of the Open Networking and Edge Summit happening September 28-30, Linux Foundation umbrella projects LF Edge and LF Networking demonstrate recent achievements highlighting trends that set the stage for next-generation technology.

  • Vibrant Networking, Edge Open Source Development On Full Display at Open Networking & Edge Summit

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today marked significant progress in the open networking and edge spaces. In advance of the Open Networking and Edge Summit happening September 28-30, Linux Foundation umbrella projects LF Edge and LF Networking demonstrate recent achievements highlighting trends that set the stage for next-generation technology. [...] “We are thrilled to announce a number of milestones across our networking and edge projects, which will be on virtual display at ONES next week,” said Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking, Edge and IOT, at the Linux Foundation. “Indicative of what’s coming next, our communities are laying the groundwork for markets like cloud native, 5G, and edge to explode in terms of open deployments.”

GNU Projects: GnuPG, GCC and GNU Parallel 20200922 ('Ginsburg')

  • OpenPGP in Rust: the Sequoia project

    In 2018, three former GnuPG developers began work on Sequoia, a new implementation of OpenPGP in Rust. OpenPGP is an open standard for data encryption, often used for secure email; GnuPG is an implementation of that standard. The GPLv2-licensed Sequoia is heading toward version 1.0, with a handful of issues remaining to be addressed. The project's founders believe that there is much to be desired in GnuPG, which is the de facto standard implementation of OpenPGP today. They hope to fix this with a reimplementation of the specification using a language with features that will help protect users from common types of memory bugs. While GnuPG is the most popular OpenPGP implementation — especially for Linux — there are others, including OpenKeychain, OpenPGP.js, and RNP. OpenPGP has been criticized for years (such as this blog post from 2014, and another from 2019); the Sequoia project is working to build modern OpenPGP tooling that addresses many of those complaints. Sequoia has already been adopted by several other projects, including keys.openpgp.org, OpenPGP CA, koverto, Pijul, and KIPA. Sequoia was started by Neal H. Walfield, Justus Winter, and Kai Michaelis; each worked on GnuPG for about two years. In a 2018 presentation [YouTube] (slides [PDF]) Walfield discussed their motivations for the new project. In his opinion, GnuPG is "hard to modify" — mostly due to its organic growth over the decades. Walfield pointed out the tight coupling between components in GnuPG and the lack of unit testing as specific problem areas. As an example, he noted that the GnuPG command-line tool and the corresponding application libraries do not have the same abilities; there are things that can only be done using the command-line tool.

  • BPF in GCC

    The BPF virtual machine is being used ever more widely in the kernel, but it has not been a target for GCC until recently. BPF is currently generated using the LLVM compiler suite. Jose E. Marchesi gave a pair of presentations as part of the GNU Tools track at the 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) that provided attendees with a look at the BPF for GCC project, which started around a year ago. It has made some significant progress, but there is, of course, more to do. There are three phases envisioned for the project. The first is to add the BPF target to the GNU toolchain. Next up is to ensure that the generated programs pass the kernel's verifier, so that they can be loaded into the kernel. That will also require effort to keep it working, Marchesi said, because the BPF world moves extremely fast. The last phase is to provide additional tools for BPF developers, beyond just a compiler and assembler, such as debuggers and simulators.

  • GNU Parallel 20200922 ('Ginsburg') released

    GNU Parallel 20200922 ('Ginsburg') has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/parallel/

Arduino and Linux in Devices/Embedded

     
  • Making a random sound diffuser with Arduino

    Humans are generally quite bad at coming up with random patterns, so when Jeremy Cook wanted to make a sound diffuser with angled blocks of wood, he created a “pseudorandomness console” using an Arduino Uno and an LCD shield. [...] Code for this unique randomization is available on GitHub, with a quick explanation in the video above. You can see the final assembly at around the 4:38 mark, showing a process of applying glue, pressing a button to generate a value, and then placing triangles accordingly.

  • Marcin 'hrw' Juszkiewicz: 8 years of my work on AArch64

    Back in 2012 AArch64 was something new, unknown yet. There was no toolchain support (so no gcc, binutils or glibc). And I got assigned to get some stuff running around it. [...] First we had nothing. Then I added AArch64 target into OpenEmbedded. Same month Arm released Foundation model so anyone was able to play with AArch64 system. No screen, just storage, serial and network but it was enough for some to even start building whole distributions like Debian, Fedora, OpenSUSE, Ubuntu. At that moment several patches were shared by all distributions as it was faster way than waiting for upstreams. I saw multiple versions of some of them during my journey of fixing packages in some distributions.

  • Intel's 10nm Elkhart Lake Atom chips feature Cortex-M7 and triple 4K

    Software support includes Yocto Project, Ubuntu, Wind River Linux LTS, Android 10, and Windows 10 IoT Enterprise. There is also support for Intel’s OpenVINO toolkit, with pre-optimized libraries for AI, ML, and computer vision acceleration.

  • Intel Unveils Atom x6000E Series, Celeron and Pentium Elkhart Lake IoT Edge Processors

    We’ve been expecting Intel Elkhart Lake processors for more than a year, and the company has now officially announced the “IoT-enhanced processors” with a new Atom x6000E Series, as well as some Celeron and Pentium N/J parts. Last year, we thought Elkhart Lake would succeed Gemini lake, but the new 11th generation 10nm processors may not be found in many consumer devices, as they target IoT edge applications with additional artificial intelligence (AI), security, functional safety, and real-time capabilities.

  • Intel Introduces IoT-Enhanced Processors to Increase Performance, AI, Security
  • ADATA XPG GAIA MINI PC is based on the Linux-friendly Intel NUC 9 Extreme Kit
  • Ensemble Graphics Toolkit to speed Linux GUI development

    Microchip has launched a GUI development toolkit for its portfolio of 32-bit microprocessors (MPUs) running Linux, helping designers of industrial, medical, consumer and automotive graphical displays to reduce development cost and time-to-market.

  • GUI toolkit for Linux enhances 32-bit microprocessor capabilities

    Microchip Technology offers a new GUI development toolkit for its portfolio of 32-bit MPUs running Linux, assisting designers of industrial, medical, consumer and automotive graphical displays to lower development cost and time-to-market.

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