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Updated: 1 hour 57 min ago

Nautilus Exif, PDF And Audio Metadata Tag Columns Extension For Ubuntu

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 01:44:44 PM
Nautilus Columns is a Nautilus file manager Python extension that adds metadata tags in the Nautilus list view, for audio (mp3, flac and wav), image and PDF files.

How to Install Bolt CMS on Fedora 29

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 12:43:12 PM
Bolt is a sophisticated, lightweight and simple CMS. In this tutorial, we will go through the Bolt CMS installation on Fedora 29 system by using Nginx as a web server, MariaDB as a database server, and optionally you can secure transport layer by using acme.sh client and Let's Encrypt certificate authority to add SSL support.

KDE Plasma 5.15 Desktop Environment Officially Released, Here's What's New

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 11:41:40 AM
The KDE Project released today KDE Plasma 5.15, a major new series that introduces numerous new features and improvements to the popular GNU/Linux graphical desktop environment.

Two graphical tools for manipulating PDFs on the Linux desktop

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 10:40:08 AM
With the way I talk and write about PDFs and tools for working with them, some people think I'm in love with the format. I'm not, for a variety of reasons I won't go into here.I won't go so far as saying PDFs are a necessary evil in my personal and professional life—rather they're a necessary not-so-good. Often I have to use PDFs, even though there are better alternatives for delivering documents.read more

Ampersands and File Descriptors in Bash

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 09:38:36 AM
In our quest to examine all the clutter ([he], |, [/he], [he]gt[/he], [he]lt[/he], {, [, (, ), ], }, etc.) that is peppered throughout most chained Bash commands, we have been taking a closer look at the ampersand symbol (&).

How to find your public IP address from the Linux command line

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 08:37:04 AM
An overview of tools and techniques to allow you to get the public facing IP address of your system from the Linux command line.

Tiny module runs Linux on i.MX8M Mini

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 07:26:33 AM
F[he]S unveiled a 40 x 35mm “PicoCore MX8MM” module that runs Linux on an up to quad-A53, 1.8GHz i.MX8 Mini with up to 8GB LPDDR4 and 32GB eMMC plus WiFi/BT, a GbE controller, PCIe, and optional -40 to 85°C support. F&S Elektronik Systeme pre-announced a tiny PicoCore MX8MM compute module featuring NXP’s new i.MX8 Mini [&#8230[/he]]

Xen Summit

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 06:12:12 AM
Notification of the Xen summit.

No, you cant take open-source code back

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 04:57:52 AM
A popular note on the Linux Kernel Mailing List claims that a program[he]#039[/he]s author can block people from using his code at his discretion. Wrong.

Linux Kernel Maintainer Summit

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 03:43:32 AM
The Linux Kernel Maintainer Summit brings together the world’s leading core kernel developers to discuss the state of the existing kernel and plan the next development cycle. This is an invite-only event. Linux Kernel Summit technical tracks are offered at Linux Plumbers Conference 2019 and are open to all LPC attendees.

How to Disable Tracker Processes and Reclaim Your Resources

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 02:29:11 AM
Tracker is a set of processes that run and index files on your disk for quicker searching. It is capable of indexing not only the normal name, location and modified dates of your files, but also the metadata and contents. This makes it both a resource hog and a privacy concern. In this tutorial we will learn how to disable Tracker and reclaim system resources.

Cloud Foundry Building the Future

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 01:14:51 AM
Whether you’re a contributor or committer building the platform, or you’re using the platform to attain your business goals, Cloud Foundry North America Summit is where developers, operators, CIOs and other IT professionals go to share best practices and innovate together.Event Title:[he]nbsp[/he]Cloud Foundry Building the Future12 FebLearn more

PyPy v7.0.0, Vulernability Affecting runc and Container Technologies, Ubuntu for ARM-based Windows Laptops, antiX MX v18.1

Wednesday 13th of February 2019 12:00:31 AM
PyPy, the alternative implementation to the Python programming language announced the release of version 7.0.0. It includes 3 different interpreters that support Python versions 2.7, 3.5 and 3.6-alpha.

Awesome way to add line in file on multiple servers using Ansible playbook in minutes

Tuesday 12th of February 2019 10:46:11 PM
This article will guide you on How to add line in file on multiple servers using Ansible playbook in minutes.

Engaging the openSUSE community

Tuesday 12th of February 2019 09:50:40 PM
The email that I received last month, revoking my openSUSE Membership, is an indication that the openSUSE community can do more to retain its users. This article explores my views on how to attract, engage and retain openSUSE users, community members and contributors. The openSUSE community should have a better Marketing strategy to make the Journey from User to Contributor a smoother experience. To try to get the roadblocks out of the way for the people that want to be informed or be involved.

How to Manage Packages with APT on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Tuesday 12th of February 2019 08:49:08 PM
APT also known as Advanced Packaging Tool is the command-line tool for managing packages in Debian-based distributions like Debian and Ubuntu. In this tutorial, we will explain how to manage packages using APT command line tool on Ubuntu 18.04 server.

Removing Profanity from the Source Tree

Tuesday 12th of February 2019 07:34:48 PM
Linus Torvalds recently stepped away from kernel developmenttemporarily in order to think about how to be less harsh withdevelopers in certain situations. Simultaneous with his departurewas a patch introducing a new Code of Conduct into the kernelsource tree. The effects of this are beginning to be felt.

How to Play Nintendo DS Games On Linux With DeSmuME

Tuesday 12th of February 2019 06:21:32 PM
DeSmuME turns your Linux PC into a fully functional Nintendo DS. Learn how to install it and start playing your games today!

Linux Watch Command

Tuesday 12th of February 2019 05:07:12 PM
In this tutorial, we will introduce you to the watch command. Watch is used to run any arbitrary command at regular intervals and displays the output of the command on the terminal window.

KDE Frameworks 5.55 Released for KDE Plasma 5.15, Improves Android Notifications

Tuesday 12th of February 2019 03:52:52 PM
The KDE Project released over the weekend the monthly update to their KDE Frameworks open-source software suite, version 5.55.0, which brings numerous improvements for users of the KDE Plasma desktop environment.

More in Tux Machines

Games: Surviving Mars and OpenMW

Kernel and Security: BPF, Mesa, Embedded World, Kernel Address Sanitizer and More

  • Concurrency management in BPF
    In the beginning, programs run on the in-kernel BPF virtual machine had no persistent internal state and no data that was shared with any other part of the system. The arrival of eBPF and, in particular, its maps functionality, has changed that situation, though, since a map can be shared between two or more BPF programs as well as with processes running in user space. That sharing naturally leads to concurrency problems, so the BPF developers have found themselves needing to add primitives to manage concurrency (the "exchange and add" or XADD instruction, for example). The next step is the addition of a spinlock mechanism to protect data structures, which has also led to some wider discussions on what the BPF memory model should look like. A BPF map can be thought of as a sort of array or hash-table data structure. The actual data stored in a map can be of an arbitrary type, including structures. If a complex structure is read from a map while it is being modified, the result may be internally inconsistent, with surprising (and probably unwelcome) results. In an attempt to prevent such problems, Alexei Starovoitov introduced BPF spinlocks in mid-January; after a number of quick review cycles, version 7 of the patch set was applied on February 1. If all goes well, this feature will be included in the 5.1 kernel.
  • Intel Ready To Add Their Experimental "Iris" Gallium3D Driver To Mesa
    For just over the past year Intel open-source driver developers have been developing a new Gallium3D-based OpenGL driver for Linux systems as the eventual replacement to their long-standing "i965 classic" Mesa driver. The Intel developers are now confident enough in the state of this new driver dubbed Iris that they are looking to merge the driver into mainline Mesa proper.  The Iris Gallium3D driver has now matured enough that Kenneth Graunke, the Intel OTC developer who originally started Iris in late 2017, is looking to merge the driver into the mainline code-base of Mesa. The driver isn't yet complete but it's already in good enough shape that he's looking for it to be merged albeit marked experimental.
  • Hallo Nürnberg!
    Collabora is headed to Nuremberg, Germany next week to take part in the 2019 edition of Embedded World, "the leading international fair for embedded systems". Following a successful first attendance in 2018, we are very much looking forward to our second visit! If you are planning on attending, please come say hello in Hall 4, booth 4-280! This year, we will be showcasing a state-of-the-art infrastructure for end-to-end, embedded software production. From the birth of a software platform, to reproducible continuous builds, to automated testing on hardware, get a firsthand look at our platform building expertise and see how we use continuous integration to increase productivity and quality control in embedded Linux.
  • KASAN Spots Another Kernel Vulnerability From Early Linux 2.6 Through 4.20
    The Kernel Address Sanitizer (KASAN) that detects dynamic memory errors within the Linux kernel code has just picked up another win with uncovering a use-after-free vulnerability that's been around since the early Linux 2.6 kernels. KASAN (along with the other sanitizers) have already proven quite valuable in spotting various coding mistakes hopefully before they are exploited in the real-world. The Kernel Address Sanitizer picked up another feather in its hat with being responsible for the CVE-2019-8912 discovery.
  • io_uring, SCM_RIGHTS, and reference-count cycles
    The io_uring mechanism that was described here in January has been through a number of revisions since then; those changes have generally been fixing implementation issues rather than changing the user-space API. In particular, this patch set seems to have received more than the usual amount of security-related review, which can only be a good thing. Security concerns became a bit of an obstacle for io_uring, though, when virtual filesystem (VFS) maintainer Al Viro threatened to veto the merging of the whole thing. It turns out that there were some reference-counting issues that required his unique experience to straighten out. The VFS layer is a complicated beast; it must manage the complexities of the filesystem namespace in a way that provides the highest possible performance while maintaining security and correctness. Achieving that requires making use of almost all of the locking and concurrency-management mechanisms that the kernel offers, plus a couple more implemented internally. It is fair to say that the number of kernel developers who thoroughly understand how it works is extremely small; indeed, sometimes it seems like Viro is the only one with the full picture. In keeping with time-honored kernel tradition, little of this complexity is documented, so when Viro gets a moment to write down how some of it works, it's worth paying attention. In a long "brain dump", Viro described how file reference counts are managed, how reference-count cycles can come about, and what the kernel does to break them. For those with the time to beat their brains against it for a while, Viro's explanation (along with a few corrections) is well worth reading. For the rest of us, a lighter version follows.

Blacklisting insecure filesystems in openSUSE

The Linux kernel supports a wide variety of filesystem types, many of which have not seen significant use — or maintenance — in many years. Developers in the openSUSE project have concluded that many of these filesystem types are, at this point, more useful to attackers than to openSUSE users and are proposing to blacklist many of them by default. Such changes can be controversial, but it's probably still fair to say that few people expected the massive discussion that resulted, covering everything from the number of OS/2 users to how openSUSE fits into the distribution marketplace. On January 30, Martin Wilck started the discussion with a proposal to add a blacklist preventing the automatic loading of a set of kernel modules implementing (mostly) old filesystems. These include filesystems like JFS, Minix, cramfs, AFFS, and F2FS. For most of these, the logic is that the filesystems are essentially unused and the modules implementing them have seen little maintenance in recent decades. But those modules can still be automatically loaded if a user inserts a removable drive containing one of those filesystem types. There are a number of fuzz-testing efforts underway in the kernel community, but it seems relatively unlikely that any of them are targeting, say, FreeVxFS filesystem images. So it is not unreasonable to suspect that there just might be exploitable bugs in those modules. Preventing modules for ancient, unmaintained filesystems from automatically loading may thus protect some users against flash-drive attacks. If there were to be a fight over a proposal like this, one would ordinarily expect it to be concerned with the specific list of unwelcome modules. But there was relatively little of that. One possible exception is F2FS, the presence of which raised some eyebrows since it is under active development, having received 44 changes in the 5.0 development cycle, for example. Interestingly, it turns out that openSUSE stopped shipping F2FS in September. While the filesystem is being actively developed, it seems that, with rare exceptions, nobody is actively backporting fixes, and the filesystem also lacks a mechanism to prevent an old F2FS implementation from being confused by a filesystem created by a newer version. Rather than deal with these issues, openSUSE decided to just drop the filesystem altogether. As it happens, the blacklist proposal looks likely to allow F2FS to return to the distribution since it can be blacklisted by default. Read more

gitgeist: a git-based social network proof of concept

Are you tired of not owning the data or the platform you use for social postings? I know I am. It's hard to say when I "first" used a social network. I've been on email for about 30 years and one of the early ad-hoc forms of social networks were chain emails. Over the years I was asked to join all sorts of "social" things such as IRC, ICQ, Skype, MSN Messenger, etc. and eventually things like Orkut, MySpace, Facebook, etc. I'll readily admit that I'm not the type of person that happily jumps onto every new social bandwagon that appears on the Internet. I often prefer preserving the quietness of my own thoughts. That, though, hasn't stopped me from finding some meaningfulness participating in Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and more recently Google+. Twitter was in fact the first social network that I truly embraced. And it would've remained my primary social network had they not killed their own community by culling the swell of independently-developed Twitter clients that existed. That and their increased control of their API effectively made me look for something else. Right around that time Google+ was being introduced and many in the open source community started participating in that, in some ways to find a fresh place where techies can aggregate away from the noise and sometimes over-the-top nature of Facebook. Eventually I took to that too and started using G+ as my primary social network. That is, until Google recently decided to pull the plug on G+. While Google+ might not have represented a success for Google, it had become a good place for sharing information among the technically-inclined. As such, I found it quite useful for learning and hearing about new things in my field. Soon-to-be-former users of G+ have gone in all sorts of directions. Some have adopted a "c'mon guys, get over it, Facebook is the spot" attitude, others have adopted things like Mastodon, others have fallen back to their existing IDs on Twitter, and yet others, like me, are still looking. Read more