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Updated: 21 min 58 sec ago

Linux history Command Tutorial for Beginners (8 Examples)

Monday 16th of July 2018 12:41:13 PM
If your work involves running tools and scripts on the Linux command line, I am sure there are a lot of commands you would be running each day. Those new to the command line should know there exists a tool - dubbed history - that gives you a list of commands you've executed earlier.

How to enable developer mode on a Chrome OS tablet (and install Linux using Crouton)

Monday 16th of July 2018 08:35:09 AM
Switching to developer channel gives you the option of using Google’s Crostini feature to install a Linux virtual machine that lets you install desktop applications like LibreOffice and GIMP and launch them from the same app launcher you use to load Android and Chrome OS apps.

How to Benchmark Your Linux System

Monday 16th of July 2018 05:43:36 AM
There are a bunch of reasons that you'd want to benchmark your Linux system. Most people benchmark out of pure curiosity or to measure the system's performance for games. Benchmarking can also help you identify problems with your system, though, and improve weak points for a smoother and more efficient experience. Benchmarking also helps you identify possible software issues and problematic upgrades with regressions.

Containers or virtual machines: Which is more secure? The answer will surprise you

Monday 16th of July 2018 02:52:03 AM
VIDEO: IBM Research has created a new way to measure software security, Horizontal Attack Profile, and it[he]#039[/he]s found a properly secured container can be almost as secure as a virtual machine.

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get LibreOffice 6.1, Mozilla Firefox 61, and FFmpeg 4.0

Monday 16th of July 2018 12:00:30 AM
The month of July 2018 was pretty busy for the openSUSE Tumbleweed development team, and the first two weeks of the month already delivered dozens of updates and security fixes.

How To Install Ruby on Ubuntu 18.04

Sunday 15th of July 2018 10:06:08 PM
This tutorial covers how to install Ruby on a Ubuntu 18.04 system. Ruby is one of the most popular languages today. It has an elegant syntax and it is the language behind the Ruby on Rails framework.

DistroWatch The Best Website For Distro Hoppers

Sunday 15th of July 2018 08:11:46 PM
DistroWatch is a well-known website in the open-source community as a dedicated place to get up-to-date information predominantly about open source operating systems. This article will cover details about what the DistroWatch website offers to open source community including its much-hyped ranking system for Linux distros.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 & CentOS 6 Patched Against Spectre V4, Lazy FPU Flaws

Sunday 15th of July 2018 04:41:02 PM
Users of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and CentOS Linux 6 operating system series received important kernel security updates that patch some recently discovered vulnerabilities.

How to create a custom Ubuntu ISO with Cubic

Sunday 15th of July 2018 01:45:59 PM
If you're looking to build a custom Linux disk image that's based on Ubuntu, Cubic makes it easy. Here's what you need to know.

Debian GNU/Linux 9.5 "Stretch" Is Now Available with 100 Security Updates

Sunday 15th of July 2018 11:51:37 AM
The Debian Project announced today the release of the fifth maintenance update to the stable Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series.

Killer tools for sysadmins, Skype alternatives, improving Linux skills, 6 must-read RFCs, and more

Sunday 15th of July 2018 09:57:15 AM
Try as you might, you can[he]#039[/he]t read everything on the internet, but here are our top 10 must-read articles from last week.

How developers can get involved with open source networking

Sunday 15th of July 2018 08:02:53 AM
There have always been integration challenges with open source software, whether in pulling together Linux distributions or in mating program subsystems developed by geographically distributed communities. However, today we're seeing those challenges writ large with the rise of large ecosystems of projects in areas such as networking and cloud-native computing.read more

An Invisible Tax on the Web: Video Codecs

Sunday 15th of July 2018 06:08:31 AM
Here’s a surprising fact: It costs money to watch video online, even on free sites like YouTube. That’s because roughly 80% of video files rely on a patented video codec to compress and transmit media quickly over the internet...

Cooking with Linux (without a Net): Remote Linux System Administration Using Webmin and Virtualmin

Sunday 15th of July 2018 04:14:09 AM
It's time for the "Cooking with Linux (without a Net)" show where I do cool Linux and open-source stuff, live, on camera, and without the benefit of post video editing, therefore providing a high probability of falling flat on my face. On today's show, we cover remote Linux system administration using Webmin...

Clear Linux Makes a Strong Case for Your Next Cloud Platform

Sunday 15th of July 2018 02:19:47 AM
Clear Linux comes from Intel’s Open Source Technology Center, which focuses primarily on the cloud. With that in mind, it should come as no surprise that Clear Linux was designed specifically for the cloud while best leveraging Intel hardware. Because Clear Linux focuses primarily on Intel hardware, it can make best use of...

Chromium OS for Raspberry Pi SBCs Is Making a Comeback Soon, Better Than Ever

Sunday 15th of July 2018 12:25:25 AM
It's been two years since we last heard from Dylan Callahan and his awesome Chromium OS for SBCs project that tried to bring the open-source, Linux-based operating system to single-board computers.

How to install Google Chrome web browser on Ubuntu 18.04

Saturday 14th of July 2018 10:31:03 PM
In this tutorial we'll show you how to install Google Chrome web browser on Ubuntu 18.04.

Groot Simplifies Entering Chroot On Any Linux Distribution

Saturday 14th of July 2018 08:36:41 PM
Groot is a helper tool which simplifies the chroot operation. It is based on the arch-chroot script available for Arch Linux, and it can be used on any Linux distribution.

Empowering Linux Developers for the New Wave of Innovation

Saturday 14th of July 2018 06:42:19 PM
That Linux is open source makes it an amazing breeding ground for innovation. Developers aren’t constrained by closed ecosystems, meaning that Linux has long been the operating system of choice for developers. So by engaging with Linux, businesses can attract the best available developer skills. 

How to Schedule Cron Jobs in cPanel

Saturday 14th of July 2018 04:47:57 PM
A cron job is a Linux command that’s executed at regular intervals. These “jobs” can be scheduled via the command line, but it’s much easier to do it via the cPanel GUI interface. cPanel also conveniently shows the number of existing cron jobs, and it can also send the output of the command via e-mail. In this tutorial, we’ll show you how to schedule cron jobs easily and efficiently.

More in Tux Machines

Stable kernel 4.4.142

I'm announcing the release of the 4.4.142 kernel. It's not an "essencial" upgrade, but a number of build problems with perf are now resolved, and an x86 issue that some people might have hit is now handled properly. If those were problems for you, please upgrade. The updated 4.4.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.4.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Read more

today's leftovers

  • Ditching Windows: 2 Weeks With Ubuntu Linux On The Dell XPS 13 [Ed: sadly it's behind a malicious spywall]
  • What Serverless Architecture Actually Means, and Where Servers Enter the Picture
  • What are ‘mature’ stateful applications?
    BlueK8s is a new open source Kubernetes initiative from ‘big data workloads’ company BlueData — the project’s direction leads us to learn a little about which direction containerised cloud-centric applications are growing. Kubernetes is a portable and extensible open source platform for managing containerised workloads and services (essentially it is a container ‘orchestration’ system) that facilitates both declarative configuration and automation. The first open project in the BlueK8s initiative is Kubernetes Director (aka KubeDirector), for deploying and managing distributed ‘stateful applications’ with Kubernetes.
  • Winds – Machine Learning Powered RSS and Podcast App
    There are numerous RSS reader apps available in Linux universe, some of them are best and some of them are your native Linux apps. Not all of them are having ability to support podcast though. Winds is very beautiful RSS and podcast app based on stream API and it comes with him nice user interface and loaded with features.
  • Reaper audio editing software gets a native Linux installer
    Reaper is a powerful, versatile digital audio workstation for editing music, podcasts, or other audio projects. I’ve used it to edit and mix every single episode of the LPX podcast and Loving Project podcast. The software is also cross-platform. There 32-bit and 64-bit builds available for Windows and macOS, and there’s been an experimental Linux version for a few years.
  • Common Vision Blox 2018 with Enhanced 3D and Linux Functionality
    CVB Image Manager is the core component of Common Vision Blox and offers unrivalled functionality in image acquisition, image handling, image display and image processing. It is also included with the free CameraSuite SDK licence which is supplied with all GigE Vision or USB3 Vision cameras purchased from Stemmer Imaging. CVB 2018 Image Manager features core 3D functionality to handle point clouds and pre-existing calibrations as well as the display of 3D data. A new tool called Match 3D, which operates in both Windows and Linux, has been added. This allows a point cloud to be compared to a template point cloud, returning the 3D transformation between the two. It can be useful for 3D positioning systems and also for calculating the differences for quality control applications. The new features in CVB 2018 Image Manager have also been extended to Linux (on Intel and ARM platforms), making it even more suitable for developing solutions in embedded and OEM applications.
  • Oldest swinger in town, Slackware, notches up a quarter of a century
    Slackware, the oldest Linux distribution still being maintained, has turned 25 this week, making many an enthusiast wonder where all those years went. Mention Slackware, and the odds are that the FOSS fan before you will go a bit misty-eyed and mumble something about dependency resolution as they recall their first entry into the world of Linux. Released by Patrick Volkerding on 17 July 1993, Slackware aimed to be the most “UNIX-like” Linux distribution available and purports to be designed “with the twin goals of ease of use and stability as top priorities”. Enthusiasts downloading the distro for the first time might take issue with the former goal – the lack of a cuddly graphical installer can be jarring.
  • SDR meets AI in a mash-up of Jetson TX2, Artix-7, and 2×2 MIMO
    Deepwave Digital has launched an Ubuntu-driven, $5K “AIR-T” Mini-ITX board for AI-infused SDR, equipped with an Nvidia Jetson TX2, a Xilinx Artix-7 FPGA, and an AD9371 2×2 MIMO transceiver.
  • 8BitDo’s DIY Kit Can Turn Your Fave Retro Gamepad into a Wireless Steam Controller
    The “8BitDo Mod Kit” is a DIY package that gives you everything you need to convert an existing wired game pad for the NES, SNES, or Sega Mega Drive/Genesis systems into a fully-fledged wireless controller. A wireless controller you could then use with Ubuntu. No soldering is required. You just unscrew the case of an existing controller and the PCB inside and replace it with the one included in the mod kit. Screw it all back up and, hey presto, wireless gaming on a classic controller. Modded controllers are compatible with Steam on Windows and macOS (one assumes Linux too), as well the Nintendo Switch, and the Raspberry Pi — that’s a versatility classic game pads rarely had!
  • Are These a Risky Play with big payoff? PayPal Holdings, Inc. (PYPL) and Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • How These Stocks Are Currently Valued TechnipFMC plc (FTI), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)?
  • Form 4 RED HAT INC For: Jul 16 Filed by: Kelly Michael A
  • Form 4 RED HAT INC For: Jul 16 Filed by: KAISER WILLIAM S

Kernel: Linux 4.19 and LWN Coverage Unleashed From Paywall

  • Linux 4.19 To Feature Support For HDMI CEC With DP/USB-C To HDMI Adapters
    Adding to the big batch of feature additions and improvements queuing in DRM-Next for the upcoming Linux 4.19 kernel merge window is another round of drm-misc-next improvements. While the drm-misc-next material consists of the random DRM core and small driver changes not big enough to otherwise warrant their own individual pull requests to DRM-Next, for Linux 4.19 this "misc" material has been fairly exciting. Last week's drm-misc-next pull request introduced the Virtual KMS (VKMS) driver that offers exciting potential. With this week's drm-misc-next pull are further improvements to the VKMS code for frame-buffer and plane helpers, among other additions.
  • Nouveau Changes Queue Ahead Of Linux 4.19
    Linux 4.19 is going to be another exciting kernel on the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) front with a lot of good stuff included while hours ago we finally got a look at what's in store for the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver. Nouveau DRM maintainer Ben Skeggs of Red Hat has updated the Nouveau DRM tree of the latest batch of patches ahead of sending in the pull request to DRM-Next. As has been the trend in recent times, the Nouveau DRM work mostly boils down to bug/regression fixes.
  • IR decoding with BPF
    In the 4.18 kernel, a new feature was merged to allow infrared (IR) decoding to be done using BPF. Infrared remotes use many different encodings; if a decoder were to be written for each, we would end up with hundreds of decoders in the kernel. So, currently, the kernel only supports the most widely used protocols. Alternatively, the lirc daemon can be run to decode IR. Decoding IR can usually be expressed in a few lines of code, so a more lightweight solution without many kernel-to-userspace context switches would be preferable. This article will explain how IR messages are encoded, the structure of a BPF program, and how a BPF program can maintain state between invocations. It concludes with a look at the steps that are taken to end up with a button event, such as a volume-up key event. Infrared remote controls emit IR light using a simple LED. The LED is turned on and off for shorter or longer periods, which is interpreted somewhat akin to morse code. When infrared light has been detected for a period, the result is called a "pulse". The time between pulses when no infrared light is detected is called a "space".
  • The block I/O latency controller
    Large data centers routinely use control groups to balance the use of the available computing resources among competing users. Block I/O bandwidth can be one of the most important resources for certain types of workloads, but the kernel's I/O controller is not a complete solution to the problem. The upcoming block I/O latency controller looks set to fill that gap in the near future, at least for some classes of users. Modern block devices are fast, especially when solid-state storage devices are in use. But some workloads can be even faster when it comes to the generation of block I/O requests. If a device fails to keep up, the length of the request queue(s) will increase, as will the time it takes for any specific request to complete. The slowdown is unwelcome in almost any setting, but the corresponding increase in latency can be especially problematic for latency-sensitive workloads.

Microsoft's Lobbying Campaign for Android Antitrust Woes

  • Google Hints A Future Where Android Might NOT Be Free
  • Android has created more choice, not less
  • Google Fined Record $5 Billion by EU, Given 90 Days to Stop ‘Illegal Practices’

    EU regulators rejected arguments that Apple Inc. competes with Android, saying Apple’s phone software can’t be licensed by handset makers and that Apple phones are often priced outside many Android users’ purchasing power.

  • EU: Google illegally used Android to dominate search, must pay $5B fine

    Thirdly, Google allegedly ran afoul of EU rules by deterring manufacturers from using Android forks. Google "has prevented manufacturers wishing to pre-install Google apps from selling even a single smart mobile device running on alternative versions of Android that were not approved by Google," the commission said.

  • EU hits Google with US$5b fine over alleged Android misuse

    The European Union has hit Google with a second fine in as many years, demanding that the search behemoth pay €4.34 billion (US$5.05 billion, A$6.82 billion) for breaching anti-trust rules over its Android mobile operating system.

    Announcing the fine on Wednesday in Brussels, the EU said Google must end such conduct within 90 days or pay a penalty of up to 5% of the average daily turnover of its parent company, Alphabet.

    The company has said it will appeal against the fine.

  • iPhone users buy half as many apps as Android users, but spend twice as much

    Apple's app store is still yielding twice the revenue of Google Play, and yet is only recording half the number of downloads.

    The figures for Q1&2 of the year suggest Apple owners spent $22.6bn on apps, whilst Android users only spent $11.8bn.

  • The EU fining Google over Android is too little, too late, say experts

    The Play Store is free to use under licence from Google, but comes with a set of conditions smartphone manufacturers must meet. The most important of these, and the one the EC has a problem with, is the requirement to set Google as the default search engine and the pre-installation of certain apps, including Google Chrome, YouTube and the Google search app. Google also dictates that some of the pre-installed apps be placed on the homescreen.

  • Don’t Expect Big Changes from Europe’s Record Google Fine

    The decision by the European Commission, the EU’s regulatory arm, found that Google manages Android, which runs roughly 80 percent of the world’s smartphones, in ways that illegally harm competition. The ruling focused on three practices: the bundling of Google's Chrome web browser and its search app as a condition for licensing the Google Play store; payments Google makes to phone manufacturers and telecom companies to exclusively preinstall the Google search app on their devices; and Google's practice of prohibiting device makers from running Google apps on Android “forks,” or alternative versions of the software unapproved by Google. In its ruling, the commission ordered Google to stop all of those practices.