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Linux and Open Source news headlines
Updated: 35 min 37 sec ago

Use sshuttle to build a poor man's VPN

Monday 14th of October 2019 12:02:50 PM
Nowadays, business networks often use a VPN (virtual private network) for secure communications with workers. However, the protocols used can sometimes make performance slow. If you can reach reach a host on the remote network with SSH, you could set up port forwarding. But this can be painful, especially if you need to work with […] Enter sshuttle — which lets you set up a quick and dirty VPN with just SSH access.

Odds and ends, the Linux and gaming Sunday Section

Monday 14th of October 2019 09:51:19 AM
Almost time to begin another week full of news, before we do let's run over a few interesting happenings recently.

System76 have put Coreboot into two of their main Intel-powered laptops

Monday 14th of October 2019 07:39:48 AM
Want your next laptop to be a bit more open? System76 have announced their Galago Pro and Darter Pro now come with Coreboot, the open source boot firmware.

How to Install and Configure an NFS Server on CentOS 8

Monday 14th of October 2019 05:28:17 AM
Network File System (NFS) is a distributed file system protocol that allows you to share remote directories over a network. With NFS, you can mount remote directories on your system and work with the files on the remote machine as if they were local files.

Pegasus Frontend, the customizable open source graphical game launcher has a new release up

Monday 14th of October 2019 03:16:46 AM
Pegasus Frontend is certainly promising, an open source graphical game launcher you can use across Linux, MacOS, Windows, Raspberry Pi, Android and more.

How to fix high memory usage in Linux ?

Monday 14th of October 2019 01:05:15 AM
In some circumstances, you may have noticed that your computer is running slow. This might be due to some applications that are consuming a big chunk of memory without you noticing it ...............In this article, we will try to see how to identify memory intensive applications and how to free up and manage memory for better performance .

How to Install LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) on Debian 9

Sunday 13th of October 2019 10:53:44 PM
A LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) stack is a combination of open-source software, typically installed on a server used for hosting dynamic websites and web applications. It includes the Linux operating system, the Apache web server, MySQL or MariaDB for data storage and management, and PHP for handling any dynamic content. In this tutorial, we will show you how to install LAMP Stack on a Debian 9 VPS.

GGPO, a rollback networking SDK for peer-to-peer games has gone open source

Sunday 13th of October 2019 08:42:13 PM
Oh how I do love to see more projects go open source! GGPO, a rollback networking SDK for peer-to-peer games that's designed to help hide network latency in fast-paced games that requires precise inputs is now on GitHub.

System76 will ship Coreboot-powered firmware, a new OS for the apocalypse, and more open source news

Sunday 13th of October 2019 04:42:18 PM
In this edition of our open source news roundup, we cover System76 shipping Coreboot-powered firmware, a new OS for the apocalypse, and more open source news!

How to Install Apache on CentOS 8

Sunday 13th of October 2019 02:30:47 PM
Apache HTTP server is the most widely used web server in the world. It is a free, open-source, and cross-platform HTTP server, including powerful features, and can be extended by a wide variety of modules.

How to Find your DHCP Server IP Address

Sunday 13th of October 2019 12:19:15 PM
A Linux quick tip showing different methods to find the IP address of your DHCP server from the Linux command line.

How to use scp command to transfer files securely using ssh on Linux ?

Sunday 13th of October 2019 10:07:44 AM
On Unix or Linux operating systems, the scp utility, stands for secure copy, is similar to the more famous command, cp, but is used to transfer files and directories between hosts on a secure encrypted network.

Augmented reality (AR) vs. virtual reality (VR): What’s the difference?

Sunday 13th of October 2019 07:56:13 AM
Augmented reality and virtual reality are often confused – but they’re more like technology cousins than twins. Let’s explain both in plain terms and examine some AR and VR use cases

Accessible automation: How AutoHotkey can enhance your daily routine

Sunday 13th of October 2019 05:44:42 AM
AutoHotkey is a free open source tool that's used to script a variety of tasks. Anything, from keyboard shortcuts to launch your favorite browser or keystroke and mouse emulation, can be accomplished with this approachable application. Learn how AutoHotkey can make your sysadmin work much more time-efficient.

5 ways to contribute to open source during Hacktoberfest

Sunday 13th of October 2019 03:33:11 AM
There's always a lot to get excited about in October: sweater weather, pumpkin spice, Halloween costumes, and for the last three years, Hacktoberfest.read more

System Cleaner BleachBit 2.3 Switches To GTK+ 3, Includes Much Faster File Scanning

Sunday 13th of October 2019 01:21:39 AM
BleachBit, a system cleaner (and more) for Linux and Windows, was updated to version 2.3 beta recently, receiving some major changes. The new version was upgraded from GTK+ 2 to GTK+ 3, file scanning should be much faster, and there's also a new dark mode, among other changes.

Configure Touchpad Settings Using gsettings Commandline Utility On Linux

Saturday 12th of October 2019 11:10:08 PM
Configure Touchpad Settings Using gsettings Commandline Utility On Linux

We, Wall, we, Wall, Raku: Perl creator blesses new name for version 6 of text-wrangling lingo

Saturday 12th of October 2019 08:58:37 PM
Perl 6 set to be reincarnated as Raku, as favored by Larry WallPerl 6 should soon be known as Raku, now that Perl creator Larry Wall has given his blessing to the name change.…

How to Install NodeBB on Ubuntu 18.04

Saturday 12th of October 2019 06:47:06 PM
In this article, we will show you how to install NodeBB on an Ubuntu 18.04 VPS.NodeBB is an open-source forum software that runs on Node.js platform that is free and easy to use. It is great for powering any kind of community forums, discussion, or bulletin boards.

Everything you need to know about Grace Hopper in six books

Saturday 12th of October 2019 04:35:34 PM
Grace Hopper is one of those iconic figures that really needs no introduction. During her long career in the United States Navy, she was a key figure in the early days of modern computing. If you have been involved in open source or technology in general, chances are you have already heard several anecdotes about Grace Hopper. The story of finding the first computer bug, perhaps? Or maybe you have heard some of her nicknames: Queen of Code, Amazing Grace, or Grandma COBOL?

More in Tux Machines

Games: AI War 2, Dominus Galaxia, Sipho, Lonely Mountains: Downhill and More

  • AI War 2, the massive RTS game confirmed for launch on October 22

    Arcen Games have now fully confirmed that October 22 is the final launch date for AI War 2 to leave Early Access. This is the sequel to the critically acclaimed AI War: Fleet Command released back in 2009, which eventually came to Linux too later in 2014. The release of AI War 2 is going to mark 10 years since the original! Funded on Kickstarter back in 2016 with the help of around 2,545 backers. AI War 2 is a grand strategy RTS hybrid against an overwhelming, inhuman enemy who has conquered the galaxy. The enemy has made only a single error: underestimating you. You must steal as much technology as you can, take enough territory to fortify your bases and launch your last stand.

  • Dominus Galaxia, a 4x strategy game heavily inspired by Master of Orion 1 has a Linux demo up

    Their aim with Dominus Galaxia is to be an upgraded spiritual successor to the original Master of Orion, they said to think of it like if Master of Orion 2 was a proper sequel and not a "a radical re-imagining". It's currently crowdfunding on Kickstarter which has 10 days to go with nearly 50% of the funding needed, with a bit of a stretch it may be able to make it. Just recently, they put up a full demo of the game with Linux support on itch.io.

  • Creature building action and survival game 'Sipho' adds some fun new zooids for your monstrosity

    Swim, kill, adapt and hopefully survive. That's the aim of the game in Sipho and the recent update adds in some new pieces for you to unlock to build your horrific sea creature with. It's such a strange game, blending together furious action with a creature builder where you unlock different parts and species. Based on real science, inspired by the Siphonophorae with your creature being built with zooids, an animal that forms part of a colony that all move together.

  • No Linux version of Lonely Mountains: Downhill yet due to IL2CPP in Unity

    Megagon Industries have now confirmed the status of Lonely Mountains: Downhill for Linux and currently it's not good news. This is a game that was funded on Kickstarter, that had Linux as a platform for release. If this sounds familiar, it's because we wrote about this game recently where the developer seemed a bit confused on the Linux version and they weren't clear on what they were doing.

  • Project RIP, a new FPS released recently with Linux support and it looks action-packed

    Fight off waves of demons in Project RIP from developer Storming Tech, a new Unreal Engine first-person shooter that has Linux support. This is the same developer who also made Escape Legacy: Ancient Scrolls, an escape room puzzle game which also seemed quite good.

  • The Northgard free Conquest expansion is launching October 22

    The huge free Conquest expansion for the strategy game Northgard is now confirmed to be releasing on October 22. As announced before this free update is going to include a new standalone game mode, which can be played solo or in co-op. Offering up a series of missions, offering a what they claim is "100+" hours of extra possible play time. The missions don't seem to be linked, offering up something new each time with specific victory conditions and rule sets.

  • The impressively smooth roguelike Jupiter Hell has a big AI upgrade and a first sale

    ChaosForge continue advancing their turn-based shooter roguelike shooter Jupiter Hell, with another big update now available. A big focus has been on the AI to actually make it a bit smarter. Humanoid enemies will now attempt to take cover and not always run in a straight line at you, which can make it a little more difficult for sure. Most enemies will also react to noise you and other NPCs make. The demon-like enemies will now track you by smell, so you can't hide from them. You might find the need to retreat more often, to find a better position.

Red Hat and Fedora: syslog-ng, Ansible, Libinput and Fedora Community

  • syslog-ng in two words at One Identity UNITE: reduce and simplify

    UNITE is the partner and user conference of One Identity, the company behind syslog-ng. This time the conference took place in Phoenix, Arizona where I talked to a number of American business customers and partners about syslog-ng. They were really enthusiastic about syslog-ng and emphasized two major reasons why they use syslog-ng or plan to introduce it to their infrastructure: syslog-ng allows them to reduce the log data volume and greatly simplify their infrastructure by introducing a separate log management layer. [...] When you collect log messages to a central location using syslog-ng, you can archive all of the messages there. If you add a new log analysis application to your infrastructure, you can just point syslog-ng at it and forward the necessary subset of log data there. Life at both security and operations in your environment becomes easier, as there is only a single software to check for security problems and distribute on your systems instead of many.

  • Ansible vs Terraform vs Juju: Fight or cooperation?

    Ansible vs Terraform vs Juju vs Chef vs SaltStack vs Puppet vs CloudFormation – there are so many tools available out there. What are these tools? Do I need all of them? Are they fighting with each other or cooperating? The answer is not really straightforward. It usually depends on your needs and the particular use case. While some of these tools (Ansible, Chef, StaltStack, Puppet) are pure configuration management solutions, the others (Juju, Terraform, CloudFormation) focus more on services orchestration. For the purpose of this blog, we’re going to focus on Ansible vs Terraform vs Juju comparison – the three major players which have dominated the market. [...] Contrary to both Ansible and Terraform, Juju is an application modelling tool, developed and maintained by Canonical. You can use it to model and automate deployments of even very complex environments consisting of various interconnected applications. Examples of such environments include OpenStack, Kubernetes or Ceph clusters. Apart from the initial deployment, you can also use Juju to orchestrate deployed services too. Thanks to Juju you can backup, upgrade or scale-out your applications as easily as executing a single command. Like Terraform, Juju uses a declarative approach, but it brings it beyond the providers up to the applications layer. You can not only declare a number of machines to be deployed or number of application units, but also configuration options for deployed applications, relations between them, etc. Juju takes care of the rest of the job. This allows you to focus on shaping your application instead of struggling with the exact routines and recipes for deploying them. Forget the “How?” and focus on the “What?”.

  • libinput's bus factor is 1

    Let's arbitrarily pick the 1.9.0 release (roughly 2 years ago) and look at the numbers: of the ~1200 commits since 1.9.0, just under 990 were done by me. In those 2 years we had 76 contributors in total, but only 24 of which have more than one commit and only 6 contributors have more than 5 commits. The numbers don't really change much even if we go all the way back to 1.0.0 in 2015. These numbers do not include the non-development work: release maintenance for new releases and point releases, reviewing CI failures [1], writing documentation (including the stuff on this blog), testing and bug triage. Right now, this is effectively all done by one person. This is... less than ideal. At this point libinput is more-or-less the only input stack we have [2] and all major distributions rely on it. It drives mice, touchpads, tablets, keyboards, touchscreens, trackballs, etc. so basically everything except joysticks.

  • Contribute to Fedora Magazine

    Do you love Linux and open source? Do you have ideas to share, enjoy writing, or want to help run a blog with over 60k visits every week? Then you’re at the right place! Fedora Magazine is looking for contributors. This article walks you through various options of contributing and guides you through the process of becoming a contributor.

  • Fabiano Fidêncio: Libosinfo (Part I)

    Libosinfo is the operating system information database. As a project, it consists of three different parts, with the goal to provide a single place containing all the required information about an operating system in order to provision and manage it in a virtualized environment.

  • Τι κάνεις FOSSCOMM 2019

    When the students visited our Fedora booth, they were excited to take some Fedora gifts, especially the tattoo sticker. I was asking how many of them used Fedora, and most of them were using Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Kali Linux and Elementary OS. It was an opportunity to share the Fedora 30 edition and give the beginner’s guide that the Fedora community wrote in a little book. Most of them enjoyed taking photos with the Linux frame I did in Edinburgh... [...] I was planning to teach the use of the GTK library with C, Python, and Vala. However, because of the time and the preference of the attendees, we only worked with C. The workshop was supported by Alex Angelo who also traduced some of my expressions in Greek. I was flexible in using different Operating Systems such as Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Kubuntu among other distros. There were only two users that used Fedora. Almost half of the audience did not bring a laptop, and then I grouped in groups to work together. I enjoyed to see young students eager to learn, they took their own notes, and asked questions. You might see the video of the workshop that was recorded by the organizers.

  • Extending the Minimization objective

    Earlier this summer, the Fedora Council approved the first phase of the Minimization objective. Minimization looks at package dependencies and tries to minimize the footprint for a variety of use cases. The first phase resulted in the development of a feedback pipeline, a better understanding of the problem space, and some initial ideas for policy improvements.

today's howtos and programming leftovers

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