Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

DW Latest Releases

Syndicate content DistroWatch
Latest distribution releases
Updated: 1 min 16 sec ago

07/23 HardenedBSD 11-1100056

Thursday 26th of July 2018 06:58:04 PM

07/21 Neptune 5.4

Thursday 26th of July 2018 06:58:04 PM

07/23 ReactOS 0.4.9

Thursday 26th of July 2018 06:58:04 PM

07/20 Ultimate 6.1-alpha

Thursday 26th of July 2018 06:58:04 PM

07/23 NethServer 6.10

Thursday 26th of July 2018 06:58:04 PM

07/18 FreeNAS 11.2-BETA1

Wednesday 25th of July 2018 12:58:06 PM

07/18 NetBSD 8.0

Wednesday 25th of July 2018 12:58:06 PM

07/18 ArcoLinux 6.9.2

Tuesday 24th of July 2018 12:58:05 PM

07/15 Archman 2018.07

Monday 23rd of July 2018 10:58:04 AM

07/14 feren OS 2018.07

Sunday 22nd of July 2018 08:58:05 AM

07/14 Debian 9.5.0

Sunday 22nd of July 2018 08:58:05 AM

More in Tux Machines

Linux Scaling Benchmarks With The AMD Threadripper 2990WX In Various Workloads

While yesterday were the benchmarks showing how Linux games struggle to scale past a few CPU cores/threads, in this article is a look at the scaling performance of various applications/workloads under Linux up to 64 threads using the AMD Threadripper 2990WX. Here's a look at how the Linux performance changes in a variety of applications from one to sixty-four threads with this new HEDT processor. The benchmarks today are for mostly curiosity sake about Linux and the Threadripper 2990WX, particularly on the impact of 32 threads (cores) to 64 threads with SMT, etc. In the next few days is a much more interesting comparison and that is looking at the Windows Server 2019 vs. Linux performance on the Threadripper 2990WX at various SMT and CCX configurations. That should reveal a lot about Windows' scaling abilities given the immense interest this week in the Windows vs. Linux Threadripper performance. But for today are just these reference numbers. Read more

AryaLinux: A Distribution and a Platform

I’ll be honest, if you’re just a standard desktop user, AryaLinux is not for you. Although you can certainly get right to work on the desktop, if you need anything outside of the default applications, you might find it a bit too much trouble to bother with. If, on the other hand, you’re a developer, AryaLinux might be a great platform for you. Or, if you just want to see what it’s like to build a Linux distribution from scratch, AryaLinux is a pretty easy route. Even with its quirks, AryaLinux holds a lot of promise as both a Linux distribution and platform. If the developers can see to it to build a GUI front-end for the alps package manager, AryaLinux could make some serious noise. Read more

Lennart Jern: How Do You Fedora?

Lennart Jern is a Swedish-speaking Finn, who has been living in Umeå, Sweden, for about three years. He was born and raised in southern Finland where he obtained his master’s degree in applied mathematics. His time at university exposed Lennart’s true passion. “While at the university, I realized that computer science was really what I wanted to work with.” In order to follow his dream of working in computer science he moved to Sweden with his wife to pursue a master’s program in computer science. After a short while he had learned enough to land a job with a local startup. “I’m working with cloud/distributed systems, specifically with tools like kubernetes and OpenShift.” Lennart’s first contact with Linux was in 2006. Some of the computers in his high school were running OpenSuse. He installed Ubuntu’s Hardy Heron in 2008 and has been using Linux ever since. Read more

Security: WebAssembly, HTTP Tokens and More

  • The Problems and Promise of WebAssembly
    WebAssembly is a format that allows code written in assembly-like instructions to be run from JavaScript. It has recently been implemented in all four major browsers. We reviewed each browser’s WebAssembly implementation and found three vulnerabilities. This blog post gives an overview of the features and attack surface of WebAssembly, as well as the vulnerabilities we found. [...] Overall, the majority of the bugs we found in WebAssembly were related to the parsing of WebAssembly binaries, and this has been mirrored in vulnerabilities reported by other parties. Also, compared to other recent browser features, surprisingly few vulnerabilities have been reported in it. This is likely due to the simplicity of the current design, especially with regards to memory management. There are two emerging features of WebAssembly that are likely to have a security impact. One is threading. Currently, WebAssembly only supports concurrency via JavaScript workers, but this is likely to change. Since JavaScript is designed assuming that this is the only concurrency model, WebAssembly threading has the potential to require a lot of code to be thread safe that did not previously need to be, and this could lead to security problems. WebAssembly GC is another potential feature of WebAssembly that could lead to security problems. Currently, some uses of WebAssembly have performance problems due to the lack of higher-level memory management in WebAssembly. For example, it is difficult to implement a performant Java Virtual Machine in WebAssembly. If WebAssembly GC is implemented, it will increase the number of applications that WebAssembly can be used for, but it will also make it more likely that vulnerabilities related to memory management will occur in both WebAssembly engines and applications written in WebAssembly.
  • Detecting Bomb And Guns Using Normal WiFi: Researchers Find A New Way
    The test was able to give out accurate results on 15 different objects ranging in there different categories — Metal, liquid, and non-dangerous items. While it’s not clear whether the government will adopt and use the newly developed tracking method in public places, this certainly looks like the best way to stop guns and bombs get into school premises.
  • What OpenShift Online customers should know about L1TF OpenShift SRE Security
    On Aug. 14, 2018, information was released about another set of “speculative execution” issues with Intel microprocessor hardware known as “L1 Terminal Fault”. As with earlier issues like Spectre and Meltdown, this information was coordinated with the release of updated software solutions to help mitigate the issue. At the time the embargo was lifted, the OpenShift SRE team worked to begin remediation (detailed below) on all OpenShift Online clusters. All Pro clusters finished remediation shortly before 18h00 EDT August 14, 2018. All Starter clusters were patched as of 23h30 EDT August 14, 2018.
  • L1TF (AKA Foreshadow) Explained in 3 Minutes from Red Hat
  • Google bod wants cookies to crumble and be remade into something more secure
    A key member of the Google Chrome security team has proposed the death of cookies to be replaced with secure HTTP tokens. This week Mike West posted his "not-fully-baked" idea on GitHub and asked for comments. "This isn't a proposal that's well thought out, and stamped solidly with the Google Seal of Approval," he warns. "It's a collection of interesting ideas for discussion, nothing more, nothing less." So far, people are largely receptive to the idea while pointing to the complexities that exist in trying to replace something that has become an everyday part of online interaction.
  • Mozilla Recommend a Privacy Extension That Is Tracking Your Web History
    Web Security, a Firefox extension with over 200,000 current users, tracks every website users visit and stores that information on a German web server. The extension was recommended by Mozilla in a blog post last week about add-ons that improve users’ privacy. Mozilla has since edited the post, removing Web Security.