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LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 39 min 54 sec ago

[$] Theoretical vs. practical cryptography in the kernel

Thursday 13th of August 2020 04:43:22 PM
Shortly before the release of the 5.8 kernel, a brief patch to a pseudo-random-number generator (PRNG) used by the networking stack was quietly applied to the kernel. As is the norm for such things, the changelog gave no indication that a security vulnerability had been fixed, but that turns out indeed to be the case. The resulting controversy had little to do with the original vulnerability, though, and everything to do with how cryptographic security is managed in the kernel. Figuring prominently in the discussion was the question of whether theoretical security can undermine security in the real world.

Holdgraf: Announcing the new Jupyter Book

Thursday 13th of August 2020 03:19:40 PM
On the Jupyter blog, Chris Holdgraf announces a rewrite of the Jupyter Book project. LWN looked at Jupyter and its interactive notebooks for Python and other languages back in 2018; Jupyter Book extends the notebook idea. "Jupyter Book is an open source project for building beautiful, publication-quality books, websites, and documents from source material that contains computational content. With this post, we’re happy to announce that Jupyter Book has been re-written from the ground up, making it easier to install, faster to use, and able to create more complex publishing content in your books. It is now supported by the Executable Book Project, an open community that builds open source tools for interactive and executable documents in the Jupyter ecosystem and beyond."

Walleij: How the ARM32 Linux kernel decompresses

Thursday 13th of August 2020 02:00:47 PM
For those who are into the details: here is a step-by-step guide through the process of decompressing an Arm kernel and getting ready to boot from Linus Walleij. "Next the decompression code sets up a page table, if it is possible to fit one over the whole uncompressed+compressed kernel image. The page table is not for virtual memory, but for enabling cache, which is then turned on. The decompression will for natural reasons be much faster if we can use cache."

QEMU 5.1.0 released

Thursday 13th of August 2020 01:57:19 PM
Version 5.1.0 of the QEMU processor emulator is out. "This release contains 2500+ commits from 235 authors." Enhancements consist mostly of additional hardware emulation, of course, but it doesn't stop there; see the changelog for lots of details.

Security updates for Thursday

Thursday 13th of August 2020 12:49:53 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (linux-4.19, linux-latest-4.19, and openjdk-8) and Fedora (ark and hylafax+).

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for August 13, 2020

Thursday 13th of August 2020 12:29:51 AM
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for August 13, 2020 is available.

[$] Building a Flutter application (part 1)

Wednesday 12th of August 2020 04:59:00 PM
In this two-part series, we will be implementing a simple RSS reader for LWN using the UI toolkit Flutter. The project recently announced version 1.20 of the toolkit on August 5. Flutter is a BSD-licensed UI development platform written in Dart that is backed by Canonical as a new way to develop desktop applications targeting Linux. Part one will cover some of the basics of the project and Flutter, with part two building on that work to focus on building a full interactive UI for the application.

Security updates for Wednesday

Wednesday 12th of August 2020 04:26:04 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (dovecot and roundcube), Fedora (python36), Gentoo (chromium), openSUSE (ark, firefox, go1.13, java-11-openjdk, libX11, wireshark, and xen), Red Hat (bind and kernel), SUSE (libreoffice and python36), and Ubuntu (dovecot and software-properties).

[$] Local locks in the kernel

Tuesday 11th of August 2020 09:10:50 PM
The Linux kernel has never lacked for synchronization primitives and locking mechanisms, so one might justifiably wonder why there might be a need to add another one. The addition of local locks to 5.8 provides an answer to that question. These locks, which have their origin in the realtime (PREEMPT_RT) tree, were created to solve some realtime-specific problems, but they also bring some much-needed structure to a common locking pattern used in non-realtime kernels as well.

Baker: Changing World, Changing Mozilla

Tuesday 11th of August 2020 06:54:51 PM
Mitchell Baker writes about changes at Mozilla, headlined by the laying-off of 250 people. "Recognizing that the old model where everything was free has consequences, means we must explore a range of different business opportunities and alternate value exchanges. How can we lead towards business models that honor and protect people while creating opportunities for our business to thrive? How can we, or others who want a better internet, or those who feel like a different balance should exist between social and public benefit and private profit offer an alternative?"

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 11th of August 2020 05:43:41 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (firmware-nonfree, golang-github-seccomp-libseccomp-golang, and ruby-kramdown), Fedora (kernel, libmetalink, and nodejs), openSUSE (go1.13, perl-XML-Twig, and thunderbird), Oracle (kernel, libvncserver, and thunderbird), Red Hat (kernel-rt and python-paunch and openstack-tripleo-heat-templates), SUSE (dpdk, google-compute-engine, libX11, webkit2gtk3, xen, and xorg-x11-libX11), and Ubuntu (nss and samba).

Stable kernels 5.8.1, 5.7.15, 5.4.58, and 4.19.139

Tuesday 11th of August 2020 05:35:46 PM
Greg Kroah-Hartman has released the 5.8.1, 5.7.15, 5.4.58, and 4.19.139 stable kernels. As usual, these contain lots of important fixes throughout the tree; users should upgrade.

Emacs 27.1 released

Tuesday 11th of August 2020 03:29:39 PM
Version 27.1 of the Emacs editor is out. New features include support for arbitrary-sized integers, HarfBuzz support, improved drawing with Cairo, and the obligatory new JSON parser.

[$] End-to-end network programmability

Monday 10th of August 2020 10:20:51 PM
Nick McKeown kicked off the virtual Netdev 0x14 conference with a talk on extending the programmability of networking equipment well beyond where it is today. His vision is of an end-to-end system with programmable pieces at every level. Getting there will require collaboration between the developers of the networking stacks on endpoint operating systems as well as those of switches, routers, and other backbone equipment. The keynote was held on July 28, a little over two weeks before the seven days of talks, workshops, and tutorials for Netdev, which begins on August 13.

Security updates for Monday

Monday 10th of August 2020 04:12:41 PM
Security updates have been issued by Debian (pillow, ruby-kramdown, wpa, and xrdp), Fedora (ark and rpki-client), Gentoo (apache, ark, global, gthumb, and iproute2), openSUSE (chromium, grub2, java-11-openjdk, libX11, and opera), Red Hat (bind, chromium-browser, java-1.7.1-ibm, java-1.8.0-ibm, and libvncserver), SUSE (LibVNCServer, perl-XML-Twig, thunderbird, and xen), and Ubuntu (samba).

On Perl 7 and the Perl Steering Committee

Saturday 8th of August 2020 04:53:53 PM
For those who are wondering about the state of the proposed Perl 7 fork and the role of the newly formed Perl Steering Committee, Ricardo Signes has put together a detailed explanation that is worth a read. "You should not expect to see a stream of unjustified dictates issuing forth from some secret body on high. You should expect to see perl5-porters operating as it generally did: with proposals coming to the list, getting discussion, and then being thumbed up or down by the project manager. This is what has been happening for years, already. Some proposals were already discussed by the project manager and some were not. If you eliminated any named mailing list for doing this, it would still happen. The PSC is a means to say that there is a default group for such discussions. If you were wondering, its initial membership was formed from 'the people who came to or were invited to the Perl Core Summit' over the last few years."

[$] 5.9 Merge window, part 1

Friday 7th of August 2020 08:21:44 PM
As of this writing, just over 3,900 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline repository for the 5.9 kernel development cycle. While this merge window has just begun, there is already a significant set of new features to point out.

Knauth elected Free Software Foundation president; Bénassy joins board

Friday 7th of August 2020 06:17:48 PM
The Free Software Foundation (FSF) has announced that Geoffrey Knauth has been elected president, and free software activist and developer Odile Bénassy has been appointed to the board of directors. Knauth is replacing Richard Stallman who resigned last year. In Knauth's statement, he said: "The FSF board chose me at this moment as a servant leader to help the community focus on our shared dedication to protect and grow software that respects our freedoms. It is also important to protect and grow the diverse membership of the community."

Security updates for Friday

Friday 7th of August 2020 04:14:50 PM
Security updates have been issued by CentOS (firefox, java-1.8.0-openjdk, java-11-openjdk, libvncserver, postgresql-jdbc, and thunderbird), Debian (firejail and gupnp), Fedora (cutter-re, postgresql-jdbc, radare2, and webkit2gtk3), openSUSE (chromium, firefox, kernel, and python-rtslib-fb), Oracle (container-tools:ol8, kernel, and nss and nspr), Scientific Linux (thunderbird), and SUSE (firefox, kernel, postgresql10 and postgresql12, python-ipaddress, and xen).

Stable kernels 5.7.14, 5.4.57, 4.19.138, and 4.14.193

Friday 7th of August 2020 03:38:24 PM
Greg Kroah-Hartman has released the 5.7.14, 5.4.57, 4.19.138, and 4.14.193 stable kernels. As usual, these contain lots of important fixes throughout the tree; users should upgrade.

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu MATE 20.04.1 for Raspberry Pi Now Has a Second Beta Ready for Testing

Martin Wimpress published a new beta version of the upcoming Ubuntu MATE 20.04.1 images for Raspberry Pi devices, which you can download and test right now on the tiny computer. Ubuntu MATE 20.04.1 for Raspberry Pi promises major new features, such as support for the latest Raspberry Pi 4 SCBs, better graphics, experimental USB booting, basic rendering for the Firefox web browser by default, support for the rpi-eeprom utility for updating the Raspberry Pi 4 bootloader EEPROM, and a new configuration tool. Based on the recently released Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS (Focal Fossa) operating system, the upcoming Ubuntu MATE 20.04.1 for Raspberry Pi release is now in its latest stages of development, with a second beta version ready for public testing. Since beta 1, the team fixed Wi-Fi issues that occurred on the first boot during the initial setup wizard and dropped the gpu_mem memory option that lets you specify how much memory the GPU can use from the config.txt file for better performance. The beta 2 is also powered by the same Linux 5.4 LTS kernel used in Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS, and uses the latest MATE 1.24 desktop environment and most the core apps that are also available in the Ubuntu MATE 20.04.1 LTS release for PCs. Read more

Android Leftovers

Video/Audio: Feren OS 2020.07, Curl, Command Line Heroes and More Red Hat

  • Feren OS 2020.07 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Feren OS 2020.07. Enjoy!

  • Daniel Stenberg: Video: Landing code in curl

    A few hours ago I ended my webinar on how to get your code contribution merged into curl.

  • Command Line Heroes - Season 5, episode 3: What Kind of Coder Will You Become?

    The 10x Coder is often positioned as a mythical developer who can always save the day. Saron Yitbarek and Clive Thompson investigate how much of that myth is grounded in truth.

  • How Quarkus fits into the Red Hat Runtimes formula

    There are plenty of new features to talk about in the world of Red Hat Runtimes. When I recently had the chance to speak with James Falkner, technical product manager for Red Hat Runtimes, he zeroed in on the Quarkus framework, or more specifically, the Red Hat branded build of Quarkus.

  • What the Dev?

    This week, we spoke to Eric Schabell, the portfolio architect director at Red Hat, about Agile integration. A lot of enterprises are moving in the direction of Agile teams all with an eye on the digital transformation story where they're headed towards delivering things in a cloud native fashion. You'll hear some of the best ways in which to achieve that Agile integration.

Fedora: Kernel Testing, OpenShift OKD and Project Intern

  • Contribute at the Fedora Test Week for Kernel 5.8

    The kernel team is working on final integration for kernel 5.8. This version was just recently released and will arrive soon in Fedora. As a result, the Fedora kernel and QA teams have organized a test week from Monday, August 17, 2020 through Monday, August 24, 2020. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate. Read below for details.

  • OpenShift OKD on Fedora CoreOS on DigitalOcean Part 1: Deployment

    This blog post is the second in a series that illustrates how to set up an OpenShift OKD cluster on DigitalOcean. The first post in the series covered some background information and pre-requisites needed for deploying a cluster. At this point you should have chosen the domain for your cluster, set up your registrar to point to DigitalOcean nameservers, installed all necessary software (doctl, openshift-install, oc, aws cli, etc..), and configured appropriate credentials in your environment (DIGITALOCEAN_ACCESS_TOKEN, AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID, AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY).

  • Closing in on the end of the Summer

    Can you believe we’re two weeks through August already! And I’m so happy that my internship has been extended so last week isn’t my last week, even if it is the last full time week for awhile.