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LWN.net is a comprehensive source of news and opinions from and about the Linux community. This is the main LWN.net feed, listing all articles which are posted to the site front page.
Updated: 4 hours 17 min ago

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for February 23, 2017

Thursday 23rd of February 2017 01:02:40 AM
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for February 23, 2017 is available.

Turunen: Qt Roadmap for 2017

Wednesday 22nd of February 2017 07:20:14 PM
Tuukka Turunen presents a roadmap for Qt. "Qt 3D was first released with Qt 5.7 and in Qt 5.8 the focus was mostly on stability and performance. With Qt 5.9 we are providing many new features which significantly improve the functionality of Qt 3D. Notable new features include support for mesh morphing and keyframe animations, using Qt Quick items as a texture for 3D elements, as well as support for physically based rendering and particles. There are also multiple smaller features and improvements throughout the Qt 3D module."

Wednesday's security advisories

Wednesday 22nd of February 2017 05:10:06 PM

CentOS has updated firefox (C7; C6; C5: multiple vulnerabilities).

Debian has updated tomcat7 (regression in previous update) and tomcat8 (regression in previous update).

Gentoo has updated archive-tar-minitar (file overwrites) and ghostscript-gpl (multiple vulnerabilities).

openSUSE has updated profanity (42.2, 42.1: user impersonation).

SUSE has updated php7 (SLE12: multiple vulnerabilities).

Ubuntu has updated kernel (14.04: three vulnerabilities), linux, linux-raspi2 (16.10: three vulnerabilities), linux, linux-snapdragon (16.04: multiple vulnerabilities), linux, linux-ti-omap4 (12.04: three vulnerabilities), linux-lts-trusty (12.04: three vulnerabilities), linux-lts-xenial (14.04: multiple vulnerabilities), and tcpdump (multiple vulnerabilities).

[$] Principled free-software license enforcement

Wednesday 22nd of February 2017 04:47:48 PM
Issues of when and how to enforce free-software licenses, and who should do it, have been on some people's minds recently, and Richard Fontana from Red Hat decided to continue the discussion at FOSDEM. This was a fairly lawyerly talk; phrases like "alleged violation" and "I think that..." were scattered throughout it to a degree not normally found in talks by developers. This is because Fontana is a lawyer at Red Hat, and he was talking about ideas which, while they are not official Red Hat positions, were developed following discussions between him and other members of the legal team at Red Hat.

Subscribers can click below for the full report of the talk by guest author Tom Yates.

A draft glibc year-2038 design document

Wednesday 22nd of February 2017 03:56:06 PM
The year-2038 apocalypse is now just under 21 years away. For those who are curious about how the GNU C Library plans to deal with this problem, there is a draft design document out for review. "In order to avoid duplicating APIs for 32-bit and 64-bit time, glibc will provide either one but not both for a given application; the application code will have to choose between 32-bit or 64-bit time support, and the same set of symbols (e.g. time_t or clock_gettime) will be provided in both cases."

Linux Plumbers Conference call for microconferences

Wednesday 22nd of February 2017 02:32:19 PM
The 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference is set for September 13 to 15 in Los Angeles, California. The core of this event is the microconferences, focused gatherings that address a specific range of problems. The call for microconferences for the 2017 event is now out. "Good microconferences result in solutions to these problems and concerns, while the best microconferences result in patches that implement those solutions."

The "Upspin" global filesystem

Tuesday 21st of February 2017 10:32:57 PM
A group of Google developers has announced the release of (an early version of) a new global filesystem called "Upspin". "Upspin looks a bit like a global file system, but its real contribution is a set of interfaces, protocols, and components from which an information management system can be built, with properties such as security and access control suited to a modern, networked world. Upspin is not an 'app' or a web service, but rather a suite of software components, intended to run in the network and on devices connected to it, that together provide a secure, modern information storage and sharing network."

Internet-enable your microcontroller projects for under $6 with ESP8266 (Opensource.com)

Tuesday 21st of February 2017 08:16:01 PM
David Egts takes a look at the ESP8266 WiFi chip, on Opensource.com. "What is the ESP8266 exactly? The ESP8266 is a 32-bit RISC CPU made by Espressif Systems. Its clock runs at 80MHz, and it supports up to 16MB of flash RAM for program storage. These specifications are quite impressive when compared to an Arduino UNO, which runs at 16MHz, only has 32KB of RAM, and is several times more expensive. Another big difference is that the ESP8266 requires only 3.3 volts of power while most Arduinos require 5 volts. Keep this voltage difference in mind when extending your existing Arduino knowledge and projects to the ESP8266 to prevent magic smoke."

Security updates for Tuesday

Tuesday 21st of February 2017 06:02:19 PM

CentOS has updated openssl (C7; C6: two vulnerabilities).

Debian-LTS has updated gtk-vnc (two vulnerabilities).

Fedora has updated kernel (F25; F24: two vulnerabilities), mingw-gstreamer1 (F25: denial of service), mingw-gstreamer1-plugins-bad-free (F25: two vulnerabilities), mingw-gstreamer1-plugins-base (F25: multiple vulnerabilities), mingw-gstreamer1-plugins-good (F25: multiple vulnerabilities), mingw-wavpack (F25; F24: multiple vulnerabilities), and xen (F25: denial of service).

Gentoo has updated adobe-flash (multiple vulnerabilities), dropbear (multiple vulnerabilities), firefox (multiple vulnerabilities), libass (multiple vulnerabilities), libvncserver (two vulnerabilities), mariadb (multiple vulnerabilities), mysql (multiple vulnerabilities), nagios-core (multiple vulnerabilities, one from 2008), ocaml (information leak), opus (code execution), php (multiple vulnerabilities), pycrypto (denial of service), qemu (multiple vulnerabilities), redis (three vulnerabilities), tcpdump (multiple vulnerabilities), thunderbird (multiple vulnerabilities), tigervnc (code execution), and xen (code execution).

Mageia has updated ruby-archive-tar-minitar (file overwrites).

openSUSE has updated libplist (42.1: multiple vulnerabilities) and nodejs (42.1: three vulnerabilities).

Oracle has updated openssl (OL7; OL6: two vulnerabilities).

SUSE has updated flash-player (SLE12-SP1: multiple vulnerabilities).

Ubuntu has updated gtk-vnc (14.04, 12.04: two vulnerabilities), spice (16.10, 16.04, 14.04: two vulnerabilities), and tomcat6, tomcat7 (14.04, 12.04: denial of service).

The return of the Linux kernel podcast

Tuesday 21st of February 2017 03:18:22 AM
After taking a few years off, Jon Masters is restarting his kernel podcast. "In this week’s edition: Linus Torvalds announces Linux 4.10, Alan Tull updates his FPGA manager framework, and Intel’s latest 5-level paging patch series is posted for review. We will have this, and a summary of ongoing development in the first of the newly revived Linux Kernel Podcast."

Monday's security advisories

Monday 20th of February 2017 07:13:16 PM

Debian-LTS has updated gst-plugins-bad0.10 (two vulnerabilities), gst-plugins-base0.10 (two vulnerabilities), gst-plugins-good0.10 (two vulnerabilities), gst-plugins-ugly0.10 (two vulnerabilities), and wireshark (denial of service).

Fedora has updated bind (F24: denial of service), python-peewee (F25; F24: largely unspecified), sshrc (F25: unspecified), and zoneminder (F25; F24: information disclosure).

Gentoo has updated glibc (multiple vulnerabilities, most from 2014 and 2015), mupdf (three vulnerabilities), and ntfs3g (privilege escalation).

Mageia has updated gnutls (multiple vulnerabilities), gtk-vnc (two vulnerabilities), iceape (multiple vulnerabilities), jitsi (user spoofing), libarchive (denial of service), libgd (multiple vulnerabilities), lynx (URL spoofing), mariadb (multiple vulnerabilities, almost all unspecified), netpbm (multiple vulnerabilities), openjpeg2 (multiple vulnerabilities), tomcat (information disclosure), and viewvc (cross-site scripting).

openSUSE has updated chromium (42.2, 42.1: multiple vulnerabilities), firebird (42.2, 42.1: access restriction bypass), java-1_7_0-openjdk (42.2, 42.1: multiple vulnerabilities), mcabber (42.2: user spoofing), mupdf (42.2, 42.1: multiple vulnerabilities), open-vm-tools (42.1: CVE with no description from 2015), opus (42.2, 42.1: code execution), tiff (42.2, 42.1: code execution), and vim (42.1: code execution).

Red Hat has updated openssl (RHEL7&6: two vulnerabilities).

Scientific Linux has updated openssl (SL7&6: two vulnerabilities).

SUSE has updated kernel (SLE12: denial of service) and kernel (SLE11: multiple vulnerabilities, some from 2004, 2012, and 2015).

Ubuntu has updated python-crypto (16.10, 16.04, 14.04: regression in previous update).

The 4.10 kernel has been released

Sunday 19th of February 2017 11:23:05 PM
Linus has released the 4.10 kernel. "On the whole, 4.10 didn't end up as small as it initially looked. After the huge release that was 4.9, I expected things to be pretty quiet, but it ended up very much a fairly average release by modern kernel standards." Features of note in this release include some long-awaited writeback throttling work, the ability to attach a BPF network filter to a control group, encryption in UBIFS filesystems, Intel cache-allocation technology support, and more. See the KernelNewbies 4.10 page for lots of details.

Stable kernels 4.9.11 and 4.4.50

Sunday 19th of February 2017 04:56:55 PM
The 4.9.11 and 4.4.50 stable kernel updates are available; each contains the usual set of important fixes.

SystemTap 3.1 has been released

Friday 17th of February 2017 09:43:55 PM
The SystemTap team has announced the 3.1 release of the tool that allows extracting performance and debugging information at runtime from the kernel as well as various user-space programs. New features include support for adding probes to Python 2 and 3 functions, Java probes now convert all parameters to strings before passing them to probes, a new @variance() statistical operator has been added, new sample scripts have been added, and more.

Security updates for Friday

Friday 17th of February 2017 03:59:18 PM

Arch Linux has updated diffoscope (file overwrite), flashplugin (multiple vulnerabilities), and lib32-flashplugin (multiple vulnerabilities).

Debian has updated spice (two vulnerabilities).

Debian-LTS has updated spice (two vulnerabilities).

Gentoo has updated imagemagick (multiple vulnerabilities).

openSUSE has updated expat (42.2, 42.1: two vulnerabilities, one from 2012), guile (42.2, 42.1: information disclosure), libgit2 (42.2: multiple vulnerabilities), mariadb (42.2, 42.1: multiple vulnerabilities), mysql-community-server (42.1: multiple vulnerabilities), openssl (42.2; 42.1: multiple vulnerabilities), and postfixadmin (42.2, 42.1: security bypass).

SUSE has updated java-1_7_0-openjdk (SLE12: multiple vulnerabilities).

Ubuntu has updated bind9 (denial of service), python-crypto (16.10, 16.04, 14.04: code execution), and webkit2gtk (16.10, 16.04: multiple vulnerabilities).

Go 1.8 released

Thursday 16th of February 2017 11:08:19 PM
The Go team has announced the release of Go 1.8. "The compiler back end introduced in Go 1.7 for 64-bit x86 is now used on all architectures, and those architectures should see significant performance improvements. For instance, the CPU time required by our benchmark programs was reduced by 20-30% on 32-bit ARM systems. There are also some modest performance improvements in this release for 64-bit x86 systems. The compiler and linker have been made faster. Compile times should be improved by about 15% over Go 1.7. There is still more work to be done in this area: expect faster compilation speeds in future releases." See the release notes for more details.

Thursday's security updates

Thursday 16th of February 2017 03:18:35 PM

Arch Linux has updated gvim (code execution) and vim (code execution).

Red Hat has updated openstack-cinder, openstack-glance, and openstack-nova (OSP7.0: denial of service from 2015).

SUSE has updated kernel (SLE12: many vulnerabilities, some from 2015 and 2014).

Ubuntu has updated libgc (code execution) and openjdk-6 (12.04: multiple vulnerabilities).

Top 10 FOSS legal stories in 2016 (opensource.com)

Thursday 16th of February 2017 01:47:16 PM
Mark Radcliffe surveys the most important legal issues surrounding free and open-source software on opensource.com. "The challenge for the Linux community is to decide when to bring litigation to enforce the GPLv2. What it means in many situations is that to be compliant is currently left to individual contributors rather than being based on a set of community norms. As Theodore Ts'o noted, this issue really concerns project governance. Although permitting individual contributors to make these decisions may be the Platonic ideal, the tradeoff is ambiguity for users trying to be compliant as well as the potential for rogue members of the community (like McHardy) to create problems. The members of the Linux community and other FOSS communities need to consider how they can best assist the members of their community to understand what compliance means and to determine when litigation might be useful in furtherance of the community's goals."

[$] LWN.net Weekly Edition for February 16, 2017

Thursday 16th of February 2017 12:38:06 AM
The LWN.net Weekly Edition for February 16, 2017 is available.

TensorFlow 1.0 released

Wednesday 15th of February 2017 09:19:20 PM
The TensorFlow 1.0 release is available, bringing an API stability guarantee to this machine-learning library from Google. "TensorFlow 1.0 introduces a high-level API for TensorFlow, with tf.layers, tf.metrics, and tf.losses modules. We've also announced the inclusion of a new tf.keras module that provides full compatibility with Keras, another popular high-level neural networks library."

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Linux Devices

  • How does the PocketCHIP compare to the Raspberry Pi?
    When the Raspberry Pi hit the tech scene, it made a huge impact. It wasn't the first tiny computer, by any means—the Chumby, the PogoPlug, and other hackable systems on chips preceded it—but there hadn't been anything quite so intentionally open and affordable as the Pi. You didn't have to hack the Pi, you just put an OS on an SD card, booted, and you were running an open source computer. The computer you were running only used a dozen watts of power, and it wasn't encased in a bulky plastic body that would end up in the landfill when you decided to upgrade.
  • LibreELEC 8.0.0 Officially Released for Raspberry Pi SBCs with Kodi 17 "Krypton"
    The development team behind the open-source LibreELEC operating system for Raspberry Pi and other embedded devices proudly announced today, February 22, 2017, the release and general availability of LibreELEC 8.0.0. Dubbed Krypton, LibreELEC 8.0.0 has been in development since early October last year, during which it received over 200 nightly builds, no less than ten official Alpha versions, and a total of three Beta releases. It's built around the recently released Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source media center, so you'll enjoy all of its cool new features.
  • Tiny, rugged, fanless mini-PC runs Linux on quad-core Bay Trail
    ADL Embedded Solutions unveiled a tiny rugged mini-PC with quad- or dual-core Atom E3800 SoCs, HD video, 2x GbE, wide DC input, and -40 to 70°C temps. A couple of months ago, San Diego-based ADL Embedded Solutions unveiled a compact ADLE3800SEC single-board computer, featuring quad- and dual-core Atom E3800 processors and based on a new, 75 x 75mm “Edge-Connect” SBC form-factor. Now, the company has built a rugged, 86 x 81 x 33mm “ADLEPC-1500” mini-PC around it.
  • Understanding the Second Phone: That is Now Almost Always Also a Smartphone
    As I am finishing the new TomiAhonen Almanac 2017 edition, as always when looking at the data, I am noticing patterns. Ones that catch my eye are the exceptions. Where a given trend line does not conform to the overall industry growth curves. The 'second phone' fits this pattern. It is 'bucking the trend'. I have been reporting on second phones on this blog and in my books for ages and I have been asking for industry analysts to go measure their count. This is still a murky area for which very little data exists but we can estimate its size reasonably well if we take the total population of phones in use, and subtract the number of mobile phone owners who report having at least one active mobile phone and account. So the current numbers fresh from the TomiAhonen Almanac 2017, tell us that the world has 5.15 Billion unique mobile phone users (owners) - this is a number that increasingly is now also reported by others like Ericsson, Cisco and the GSM Association; and I did the comparison of this data point earlier this week to see how valid it is. (It is very valid).
  • FLOSS Weekly 422: Arduino Update

Ubuntu Leftovers: Augmented Reality Helmets With Ubuntu, Ubuntu 17.10 Plans

  • [VIDEO] Mortenson Talks about How Daqri Smart Helmet Puts BIM Advantages on the Job [Ed: Ubuntu-based]
    Los Angeles-based AR specialist Daqri appears to have made a next-gen breakthrough with the latest version of its Smart Helmet, which was joined earlier this month by a new sister product, Smart Glasses. Daqri unveiled the latter device in Las Vegas at the annual Consumer Electronics Show, which this year featured a raft of new AR products from several manufacturers. Architects are among the market targets for the lightweight Smart Glasses.
  • Skanska UK to test Daqri augmented reality-enabled hard hats
  • Ubuntu-Powered Robots and Augmented Reality Helmets to Be Showcased at MWC 2017
    As expected, Canonical will be present once again at the MWC (Mobile World Congress) event this year, where the company behind the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system will showcase its latest innovations. MWC 2017 is taking place first thing next week, between February 27 and March 2, and we've been informed earlier by Canonical that they are currently finalizing arrangements for their presence at the world's largest gathering for the mobile industry, at stand 3k31 in Hall P3.
  • Ubuntu 17.10 to Ship with Nautilus 3.24 File Manager, without Type-Ahead Search
    Ubuntu GNOME's Jeremy Bicha is announcing today that the soon-to-be-released Nautilus 3.24 file manager will be implemented in the Ubuntu 17.10 operating system, whose development will start in late April this year. It's a known fact that Ubuntu is always shipping with an older Nautilus version because Canonical always includes some patches to offer certain functionality to users. And it looks like these patches need to be updated every time a new Nautilus version is out, though some of them have failed to work do to the file manager's constant refactoring.

Qt 5.9 Alpha Released

I am happy to inform you that Qt 5.9 Alpha has been released today. Qt 5.9 Alpha is an important milestone on our way to the final Qt 5.9.0 release, which is targeted to be released by the end of May 2017. The Alpha release is available only as source packages. Binary installers will be available via the online installer in conjunction with the Beta release as well as development snapshots during the coming weeks. Read more